Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Logo
Apply to SIUE


College of Arts and Sciences
CAS Masthead

.

The Department of Philosophy

.

42nd Fritz Marti Lecture

.

Speaker: Kathryn Norlock, Trent University

“Blaming, Online Shaming, and Grandstanding”


April 12, 2019

Mississippi / Illinois Room

Reception @ 3:00pm, Lecture @ 4:00pm

Kathryn Norlock

.

     Kathryn Norlock 

Kathryn Norlock is the Kenneth Mark Drain Chair in Ethics at Trent University in Peterborough, Canada. She is author of Forgiveness from a Feminist Perspective (2009), editor of The Moral Psychology of Forgiveness (2017), and co-editor of Evil, Political Violence, and Forgiveness: Essays in Honor of Claudia Card (2009) as well as edited journal collections on the topics of Miscarriage, Reproductive Loss, and Fetal Death (2015) and Oppression and Moral Agency (2009). She is also a co-founder and co-editor of Feminist Philosophy Quarterly, a peer-reviewed, open-access journal free to authors and readers.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Who was Fritz Marti?

On the first of January in 1894, Fritz Marti was born in Switzerland. In the fall of 1965, he joined the faculty at SIUE at the age of 71. Although older than many of his colleagues, Fritz was lively and enthusiastic. He came to SIUE with a rich and exciting history. Growing up in Switzerland, he held a job as an iron worker before fighting with the Swiss army during World War 1. Afterwards, he studied mechanical engineering and philosophy at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. With his newly earned Ph.D. in philosophy, Fritz Marti immigrated to the US in 1922. Here, he taught at many different universities, served as president of both the Southern Society for Philosophy and Psychology and the Southern Society for Philosophy of Religion, ran a private preparatory school in Ohio, and even taught art history.

For more information about Fritz Marti, visit Oregon State University's website.


Philosophy Department Faculty with Bust of Fritz Marti

Previous Fritz Marti Lectures:

from most recent

2018: Richard Kearney, Boston College, "Recovering Our Senses"

2017: John Heil, Washington University in St Louis, "Free Will and Physics"

2016: Kevin Hart, University of Virginia, "Phenomenology of Hermeneutics"

2015: Susan Haack, Miami University, "Credulity and Circumspection: Epistemology and the Ethics of Belief"

2014: Jason Stanley, Yale University, “Language as a Mechanism of Control”

2013: David Wood, W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy & Professor of European Studies, Vanderbilt University, "Thinking Out of the Box (after Heidegger)"

2010: Claudia Card, Emma Goldman Professor of Philosophy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, "Evils and Inexcusable Wrongs"

2009: Arthur Fine, University of Washington, "Worldly Understanding: Science, Realism, and Objectivity"

2008: Alvin Plantinga, Notre Dame, "Divine Action in the World"

2007: Peter van Inwagen, University of Notre Dame, "We're Right, They're Wrong"

2006: John Doris, Washington University in St. Louis, "Skepticism about Evil: From My Lai to Abu Ghraib"

2005: Thomas R. Flynn, Emory University, "Jean-Paul Sartre, A Man of the Nineteenth Century Addressing the Twenty-First?"

2004: Theodore Sider, Rutgers University, "Vague, So Untrue"

2003: Nicholas Rescher, University of Pittsburgh, "Science and Common Sense"

2002: Ernest Sosa, Brown University, "The Skeptic's Appeal Denied: the Historical Roots of Philosophical Skepticism, and its Relevance to Philosophy Today"

2001: Iris Young, University of Chicago, Department of Political Science, "Difference Is Not Identity: Some Remarks on Structural Inequality"

2000: Mark Sagoff, Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy in the School of Public Affairs, University of Maryland, "Ecosystem Design in Historical and Philosophical Context"

Click here for information about older lectures
facebookoff twitteroff vineoff linkedinoff flickeroff instagramoff socialoff