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March 3, 2003

FOTAD Presents 'Puss 'n' Boots' As Part Of A Season For The Child

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) The "crazy cat in the high boots" comes to Southern Illinois University Edwardsville in Puss 'n' Boots at 7 p.m. Saturday, March 8, for a performance in Katherine Dunham Hall theater. The stage play of the classic children's story will be performed by the Imaginary Theatre Company, the traveling arm of the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis.

The event is part of A Season for the Child, a series of family theater productions sponsored each year by the Friends of Theater and Dance (FOTAD), a support group for the SIUE Department of Theater and Dance, and TheBANK of Edwardsville.

The story chronicles the adventures of Puss, who is cleverer than his master and sets out to make his life free from want. Along the way, Puss overcomes an ogre, pleases a king, and wins the heart of the princess. Back to top

Tickets are $5 and are available through the SIUE Fine Arts box office, (618) 650-2774. Proceeds benefit the FOTAD scholarship fund.


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March 6, 2003

'Celebration Of World Faiths' Set For March 22 At Religious Center

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) The Friends of the Religious Center (FRC), a support group for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Religious Center, is sponsoring A Celebration of World Faiths from 7-9 p.m. Saturday, March 22, at the domed center, located between the Morris University Center and the Art and Design Building.

Spiritual leaders and groups from several Christian and non-Christian traditions will share music, scripture, prayer, and information about their faiths. The goal is an evening of learning and fellowship, and an opportunity to tell visitors more about the Friends of the Religious Center. The new support group is dedicated to preserving the center as the place on campus for serving the spiritual needs of SIUE students, as well as its architectural importance.

"The FRC board of directors is made up of about a dozen members of the university community and the surrounding community at-large," said Greg Fields, an associate professor of Philosophical Studies at the university and chair of the newly formed group. "Also included in the group are the three ministerial directors headquartered at the center. We all share an interest in the structure as an architectural treasure."

Admission is free to the March 22 event, but donations will be accepted. Refreshments with ethnic themes will be served, and all are welcome.

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March 6, 2003

Pianist Ian Hobson Continues Recital Series At SIUE-Performing Chopin

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) Renowned concert pianist Ian Hobson will continue his series of recitals at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville-performing the complete solo piano works of Frédéric Chopin-at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, March 19-20, in SIUE's Katherine Dunham Hall theater.

The sixth and seventh edition of the nine-recital series is titled 1832-1839: "The Paris Years" and 1839-1841: "Productive Times with Sand at Nohant and Paris." The Chopin series-which concludes April 1-2-is being performed chronologically, following stages in the Polish composer's life and career.

The March 19 recital includes: Mazurkas, Op. 17, Nos. 1-4; Nocturne in C Minor; Nocturnes, Op. 37, Nos. 1-2; Impromptu in A-flat Major, Op. 29; Mazurkas, Op. 41, Nos. 1-4; Largo in E-flat Major; Andantino in G Minor (arr. of the song, "Wiosna"); Variation No. 6 in E from Hexameron; Waltz in F Major, Op. 34, No. 3; Ballade in G Minor, Op. 23; Ballade in F Major, Op. 38; Scherzo in C-sharp Minor, Op. 39; and Sonata in B-flat Minor, Op. 35.

The March 20 recital includes: Cantabile in B-flat Major; Prelude in A-flat Major; Impromptu in F-sharp Major, Op. 36; Trois nouvelles etudes, Nos. 1-3; Mazurka in A Minor, Op. 42a; Mazurka in A Minor, Op. 42b; Waltz in A-flat Major, Op. 42; Polonaise in F-sharp Minor, Op. 44; Sostenuto in E-flat Major; Ballade in A-flat Major, Op. 47; Mazurkas, Op. 50, Nos. 1-3; Nocturnes, Op. 48, Nos. 1-2; Waltz in F Minor, Op. 70, No. 2; and Fantaisie in F Minor, Op. 49.

Called one of the greatest pianists of our time, Hobson's programs consistently demonstrate a repertoire that spans centuries and demands a command of styles and scholarly vision. His recordings and recitals encompass a cross section of works.

A professor of Music at the University of Illinois, Hobson maintains an active performance, conducting, and recording schedule. In recent seasons, Hobson has performed at Wigmore Hall, London, Alice Tully Hall, the "Mostly Mozart Festival" in New York, and the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.

Hobson also has performed the Chopin and Moscheles concertos at the Bard Music Festival, and has presented recitals in the United States, England, and Europe, featuring diverse works such as Beethoven's complete sonatas, excerpts from Gershwin's Song Book, Schumann's major piano works, Ravel's Gaspard de la nuit, and Prokofiev's Sonata No. 7, to name a few.

He also has been on the juries of international piano competitions, such as the Van Cliburn, and is known worldwide as a pianist, conductor, and teacher. Hobson has recorded more than 35 compact discs of works, including piano concertos by Mendelssohn, Mozart, Poulenc, and Saint-Saëns, as well as Liszt transcriptions and the complete Beethoven sonatas, Brahms variations, Chopin etudes, Hummel sonatas, and Rachmaninoff preludes, etudes-tableaux, and transcriptions.

Tickets are $7; students and senior citizens, $6. For ticket information, call the SIUE Department of Music, (618) 650-3900.

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March 6, 2003

EBR Club To Collaborate Again With National Black Writers Conference

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) In celebration of Women's History Month and the Eugene B. Redmond Writers Club's 17th birthday, members of the club will present "Their Eyes Were Watching God," Zora Neale Hurston's 1937 love story, from 6-8 p.m. Tuesday, March 18, in Room 0003 of Southern Illinois University Edwardsville's East St. Louis Center, 411 E. Broadway.

The free family event also will focus on women co-founders of the Club, which began in March of 1986, as well as women instrumental in regional cultural and literary history such as Annette Officer, Bessie Garvin, Katie Wright, Maya Angelou, Shirley Portwood, Katherine Dunham, and Clementine Reeves Hamilton.

EBR Club co-founder Eugene Redmond, a professor of English Language and Literature at SIUE, said members will "sing" the literary and folkloric virtues of "Eyes" at the March 18 event. "This will include tributary readings of kwansabas and original reviews," Redmond said. Like the club's February Black Literary Heritage Symposium, the March 18 event also is being co-sponsored by the National Black Writers Conference of the Center for Black Literature at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn, New York.

Hurston (1891-1961) was a friend of the poet Langston Hughes, both products of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s-30s. Following a period of fame, Hurston slipped into poverty and, upon her death, was buried in an unmarked grave. Between the late 1960s and the present, however, Hurston's work was rediscovered (and vigorously re-issued) as she became an icon-thanks largely to the efforts of Alice Walker and the women's movement. "Indeed, Walker has called 'Eyes' one of the 'finest achievements' in African-American literature," Redmond said.

In addition to the EBR Writers Club, other sponsors of the March 18 event include the SIUE English department, the Renaissance Literary Arts Press, Drum voices Revue, the East St. Louis Cultural Revival Campaign Committee, the Miles Davis Arts Festival Advisory Board, the Black River Writers Press, and the National Black Writers Conference.

For information about the "Eyes" and EBR Writers Club's birthday celebration, call (618) 650-3991.

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March 6, 2003

33rd Annual Antiques Show Set For March 22-23 At SIUE

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) More than 60 dealers in antiques from the Midwest will display and sell a variety of items from furniture, jewelry, fine glass, porcelain, and china to tools, toys, and books Saturday and Sunday, March 22-23, at the 33rd Annual Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Antiques Show and Sale at SIUE's Vadalabene Center.

The event, sponsored by the Friends of Lovejoy Library, will take place in the center's gymnasium from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, and from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Free informal appraisals with paid admission (2 item limit) will be offered Saturday from 2-5 p.m. and Sunday from 1-3 p.m.

Tickets are $5 and are available at the door; tickets are good for both days. For a $20 fee, "early bird" patrons may enter the show between 9 and 10 a.m. Saturday. Children under 13 years of age are admitted free. For more information, call the Friends of Lovejoy Library, (618) 650-2730.

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March 6, 2003

Fuller's SIUE Dome Now Has 'Friends' To Care For It

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) R. Buckminster Fuller was quite a thinker by most accounts, a visionary to many who advocated the environmental global village idea long before anyone else really could grasp the concept.

His structure, The Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Religious Center, embodies the "Spaceship Earth" concept that Fuller espoused-that we are a global family and Earth is our vehicle that must be maintained. It's distinct geodesic design has always been a conversation piece for campus visitors.

But, after 30-plus years, the center itself needs some major repair and the Friends of the Religious Center (FRC) support group is being created to facilitate matters. The FRC board of directors is made up of about a dozen members of the university community and the surrounding community at-large, including the three ministerial directors headquartered at the center. They all share an interest in the structure as an architectural treasure.

"Many people may not know it, but the Religious Center structure is not a university-owned building," says Greg Fields, an associate professor of Philosophical Studies at SIUE and chair of the Friends group. "It was built with private money and opened in 1971 to serve the spiritual needs of the students.

"The Center is dedicated to keep religious faith and experience in dialogue with higher education," Fields said, "and to enriching the spiritual lives of students, faculty, and staff, as well as residents of the surrounding communities.

"The building has been maintained through the years by the University Religious Council, a private group, which in turn leases the land on which the center stands from SIUE," Fields said. "However, because of dwindling resources, the council has had more trouble in the past few years attaining funds to keep the building in repair. So, some concerned members of the community have banded together to form the FRC and help raise money for the building," Fields said.

Fields said the group is planning fund-raising events and hopes to attract attention to others who are concerned with preserving local architecture. The FRC will present A Celebration of World Faiths, from 7-9 p.m. Saturday, March 22, at the Religious Center. Spiritual leaders and groups from several traditions will share music, scripture, prayer, and information about their faiths. The goal is an evening of learning and fellowship, and an opportunity to tell visitors more about the Friends of the Religious Center. This is a free event, with donations accepted. Refreshments with ethnic themes will be available, and all are welcome.

"This building was designed by Buck Fuller when he was a member of the faculty at both Edwardsville and Carbondale," Fields pointed out. "Not only is this a unique piece of architectural wonder, but also an integral part of the history of this university."

Most of the money raised by the URC through the years has helped maintain the building on a daily basis; however, a capital campaign is needed for more extensive projects, such as major roof repair and replacement of the heating and cooling system, as well as landscaping to deter flooding.

The FRC also is concerned with raising funds to help with programming at the center. The FRC is interested in expanding the resources of the university's new minor program in Religious Studies, a subject, Fields says, "that is important for both religiously inclined students, and for those who are not, as a means to understand religion as a major force in the history and future of the world."

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March 6, 2003

Area High Schools Win Their Divisions In Regional Math Contest At SIUE

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) Gibault Catholic High School at Waterloo and Red Bud High School won first place in Division 1A and 2A, respectively, of the Illinois Council of Teachers of Mathematics (ICTM) competition recently on the campus of Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.

Meanwhile, Carbondale High School won Division 3AA and O'Fallon took the top spot in the 4AA competition. Marion High School took second in the 3AA, while Belleville East Township took second in the 4AA.

Division 4AA encompasses schools with more than 2,000 enrolled, while Division 3AA includes schools with enrollment between 1,000 and 1,999. Division 2A schools have between 400 and 999 students, while Division 1A includes schools with enrollment of 399 or less. The four division winners at SIUE, among 21 regional winners from across Illinois, will advance to the state competition at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on April 26.

Throughout the state, more than 225 schools competed at the regional level for team and individual rankings. There were 15 schools competing at the SIUE event in February, according to Associate Professor Marilyn Hasty and Assistant Professor Tammy Voepel, co-directors of the regional event and both faculty members of the SIUE Department of Mathematics and Statistics. SIUE math faculty conducted the competition.

Hasty said skills tested included factoring logarithms, inequalities, logical reasoning, and creative analysis used in algebra through calculus. Scoring was based on accuracy and speed, she said.

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March 13, 2003

SIUE Students Bring International Trade Possibilities To Small Businesses

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) College students often do research for papers and projects as a regular part of coursework, but seldom do they get to apply that research in the real world, much less see results. But, that's what happened in Silvia Torres' international business class during fall semester at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.

Several area companies have used student-created plans from the course-Managing in the Global Economy/International Management-to begin laying the groundwork for exporting their products, said Torres, director of SIUE's International Trade Center. "We recruited nine companies last year to participate in this project," Torres said. "These are small businesses without budgets or personnel to do the kind of research it takes to establish international clients."

The companies-from around the state of Illinois-each were assigned a team of SIUE students to gather research about international markets. "The students met with company officials, visited facilities, and became familiar with product lines," Torres said. "They also researched world markets, some recommended by the students themselves and others requested by a company."

That research was applied to the needs of each of the companies and an export plan was devised.

Each company carried out its assigned plan and results recently began coming back to Torres. The results were positive with participating companies successfully making contacts with potential distributors in China, Canada, Mexico, and Russia.

Jim Rompel, president of Safe Effective Alternatives (SEA) Inc. in Belleville, said the students in Torres' class researched world markets for his products and are now following up on a plan to export those products-non-pesticide treatments for head lice-to Canada and Australia. "Controlling head lice is a problem worldwide, but the students found that based on SEA's resources Canada and Australia would be our best potential export markets," Rompel said.

Rompel had high praise for Torres and the SIUE International Trade Center, which in itself has helped many businesses in the area such as SEA. As for the International Business course project, Rompel was very impressed with the quality of the students' work. "I would recommend involvement in this class project to any company."

Those sentiments were echoed by Dennis Wilmsmeyer, a senior planner for the Tri-City Regional Port District, a state-created agency. The port district's needs were a bit more challenging for the students in Torres' class. "We've trying to team up with the New Orleans port district in our exporting plan," Wilmsmeyer said. "We've been attempting to target countries such as China, Mexico and Cuba for exporting our clients' grain, grain-related products, steel, and liquid products. We feel that working with New Orleans gives us more volume and puts more products on the Mississippi River.

"The students' research recommended China and Mexico, so we've made a contact with New Orleans and we will meet with them and present the students' export plan," Wilmsmeyer said. "Frankly, I was surprised, almost shocked, to see the quality of the research done by these students. They had no prior experience in our area of expertise, but they visited with us at our facilities at Granite City, and came back with a report that had much more quality and quantity than I expected."

Torres said the course is a great opportunity for business students to get involved with companies in the real world. "After the research was completed, the students made presentations to the company representatives. I sat in on the presentations and then sought feedback from the companies to determine a grade for each student. I was very pleased with the outcome."

When asked if languages had been a barrier to the students' research, Torres said most companies overseas have English-speaking representatives. "I recommend this course to any business major interested in exporting procedures and I encourage business people who are looking to begin exporting products to take advantage of this course in the future."

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March 13, 2003

Board Approves George Arnold For Distinguished Service Award

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) George Arnold, an emeritus associate professor of Environmental Engineering at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, will receive a Distinguished Service Award during SIUE's May 10 commencement, according to action taken today by the SIU Board of Trustees at its regular monthly meeting.

Arnold is the third person to be honored at the May 10 ceremonies-jazz legend John "Bucky" Pizzarelli, master of the seven-string guitar, and world-renowned genetic biotechnologist Roy Curtiss III already were approved last month by the board to each receive honorary degrees at spring commencement.

The SIUE Distinguished Service Awards have been presented for 35 years to those who have given outstanding or unusual service to the university, the region, or the state. Honorary degrees have been awarded for nearly 40 years to those who have made significant contributions to cultural, educational, scientific, economic, social, or humanitarian fields, or other worthy fields of endeavor.

Arnold has championed several environmental projects locally and statewide, including two bikeways bills passed by the Illinois General Assembly with the help of the late Sen. Sam Vadalabene: one directing the Illinois Department of Transportation to establish a bikeways program, while the second called for the Department of Natural Resources to build the bikeways. The result can be seen in the hundreds of miles of safe and scenic bicycle routes throughout the state.

Arnold is a long-standing member of the 10-state Mississippi River Parkway Commission and was chosen to represent Illinois in the Federal Mississippi River Corridor Study to promote the river's heritage. He was a founder of and is currently past-president of the Madison County Conservation Alliance, devoted to maintaining a clean environment.

More recently, Arnold was instrumental in establishing the new Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center near Hartford. The center, recently completed, was supported by U.S. Congressman Jerry Costello in collaboration with Jim Edgar and George Ryan, past Illinois governors.

Pizzarelli, who has conducted workshops at SIUE for the university's Jazz Studies Program, has been a legend in the music world for more than half a century. Professor Curtiss and his research group have sought to define the biochemical bases and genetic controls by which bacterial pathogens cause various human ills.

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March 13, 2003

27th Annual Probst Lecture Set For March 31 At SIUE

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) The 27th Annual William J. Probst Memorial Lecture will present George B. Richter-Addo, Presidential Professor of Chemistry at Oklahoma University, at 7 p.m. Monday, March 31, in Meridian Ballroom, on the first floor of Southern Illinois University Edwardsville's Morris University Center.

The annual lecture is sponsored by the SIUE Department of Chemistry and the SIUE Chemistry Club. Richter-Addo will speak about "Small, Versatile, and Potent: NO and You," regarding the role nitric oxide (NO) plays in the human body. White blood cells secrete NO, which regulates blood pressure and acts as a defense against infection; nerve cells use it to communicate with each other.

"It's one of those molecules that's in the right place at the right time," said Assistant Professor Michael Shaw, coordinator of the Probst Lecture. "Nitric oxide can be helpful as it is secreted by the body, but if you inhaled it, it would be deadly. For example, the nose secretes a very small amount of NO that helps dilate the blood vessels of the body, which in turn lowers blood pressure and facilitates good blood flow," Shaw said.

Richter-Addo's research work has had relevance to varied biological activities ranging from dilation of blood vessels, erectile dysfunction, the operation of the immune system, and cancer.

In addition to his lecture the evening of March 31, Richter-Addo will conduct a student research symposium at 2 that afternoon, also in Meridian Ballroom. He also will speak to Chemistry faculty about "The Bio-Inorganic Chemistry of Heme-NO Interactions" at 10 a.m. Tuesday, April 1, in Room 3114 of SIUE's Science Building.

Born in Glasgow, Scotland, Richter-Addo traveled extensively in pursuit of his education before settling in the United States. He received an Honors bachelor of science and an Education degree in 1982 from the University of Cape Coast in Ghana, West Africa. The following year he enrolled in graduate school at the University of British Columbia, where he performed research in organometallic nitrosyl chemistry.

Richter-Addo earned a doctorate in 1988 followed by postdoctoral work at the University of Alberta and at the University of Utah. He joined the Chemistry/Biochemistry faculty at Oklahoma in 1993.

The lecture series is funded in part by: the SIUE College of Arts and Sciences, the SIUE Graduate School, the SIUE Department of Chemistry, and student activity fees. The Probst Lecture was established to honor the late Professor William Probst who taught organic chemistry at SIUE for nearly 20 years before his death in 1975. The lectures and seminars are free and open to the public. For more information, call the Department of Chemistry. (618) 650-2042.

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March 13, 2003

Grammy Award-winning Takacs Quartet to Appear in Concert on SIUE 'Arts & Issues' series March 27

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) - Recognized as one of the world's greatest string quartets, the Takacs Quartet will perform an evening of Beethoven and Haydn on Thursday, March 27, as part of Southern Illinois University Edwardsville's Arts & Issues series. The 7:30 p.m. concert will be held in the University's Dunham Hall theater.

"Our audience should be prepared for an extraordinary evening of chamber music," said John Peecher, assistant director of development for the College of Arts and Sciences and coordinator of the Arts & Issues series. "The Takacs Quartet has been acclaimed internationally, and they will be appearing here on campus fresh from their Grammy Award win last month."

The first volume of the Quartet's Beethoven Cycle (middle quartets) received the Grammy Award for "Best Chamber Music Album 2002." Released in May of last year, "Beethoven: String Quartets ("Razumovsky" Op. 59, 1-3; "Harp" Op. 74), was also named the Gramophone "2002 Chamber Music Recording of the Year," and received a Grammy nomination for "Best Classical Album", the Chamber Music America/WQXR Record Award, and the Japan Record Academy Award for Chamber Music in 2002.

The Takács Quartet was formed by Gabor Takács-Nagy, Károly Schranz, Gabor Ormai, and András Fejér in 1975, while all four were students at Budapest's Liszt Academy. It first received international attention in 1977, winning First Prize and the Critics' Prize at the International String Quartet Competition in Evian, France. Thereafter, the Takács won the Gold Medal at the 1978 Portsmouth and Bordeaux Competitions and First Prizes at the Budapest International String Quartet Competition (1978) and the Bratislava Competition (1981). The quartet made its North American debut tour in 1982.

Since its formation in 1975, the ensemble has appeared regularly in every major music capital and prestigious festival. The Quartet - consisting now of violinist Schranz, cellist Fejér, violinist Edward Dusinberre, and violist Roger Tapping - is based in Boulder, Colorado, where it has held a residency at the University of Colorado since 1983. The Takács is a resident quartet at the Aspen Festival and its members are also visiting fellows at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London.

During the 2002 -2003 season, the Takács Quartet will have performed more than forty concerts in the U.S., and toured extensively in Europe. Special projects include a tour with the famed Hungarian gypsy ensemble Muzsikás; several concerts with pianist Garrick Ohlsson; and a Beethoven cycle presented by the Cleveland Orchestra. In addition to its annual residency at the Aspen Festival and a residency at the Music Academy of the West in Santa Barbara, worldwide 2002-2003 tour cities include Washington, Miami, Montréal, Honolulu, Ann Arbor, Caramoor, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Los Angeles, Urbana, Williamstown, Kansas City, London, Paris, Amsterdam, Hamburg, Zurich, Copenhagen, and Berlin. In 2001-2002, the Takács toured in 15 cities with former U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky, culminating in a concert at Lincoln Center. Their program of music and poetry was centered around the theme of Love.

Recent Takács seasons have included Bartok cycles in London, Madrid and Seville; Schubert cycles in London, Lisbon, Utrecht and Spain; and a Brahms cycle in London. The ensemble has performed Beethoven cycles in Paris, London, Zurich, Sydney, New York, at Middlebury College, and numerous concerts surrounding the Mozart anniversary year in 1991. During the summer of 1993, the Takács gave a cycle of three concerts at the Salzburg Festival featuring the quartets of Bartok and Brahms. The Quartet made its Lincoln Center debut on the Great Performers Series in 1989, and performed six concerts at the Haydn Festival in 1991 with pianist András Schiff at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (repeated in London's Wigmore Hall). The quartet made its Carnegie Hall debut in 1992.

The ensemble's discography ranges from Schubert's Quartet in G Major and his "Notturno" to quartets by Smetana and Borodin; Haydn's Op. 76, 77 and 103 quartets; the three Brahms quartets and Piano Quintet in F minor with András Schiff; Chausson's Concerto for Violin, Piano, and String Quartet with Joshua Bell and Jean-Yves Thibaudet; Mozart's String Quintets, K 515 and 516 with Gÿorgy Pauk, and Schubert's Quartettsatz, Rosamunde, and Death and the Maiden. Their recording of the Bartok cycle received the Gramophone award for 1998, and in 1999 it was nominated for a Grammy. The ensemble's subsequent recording release for Decca/London, with which it signed an exclusive recording contract in 1988, includes the Schubert "Trout" Quintet with Andreas Haefliger, piano (Grammy nominee, 2000), and Dvorak's Quartet Op. 51 and Piano Quintet Op. 81, also with Mr. Haefliger. Volume two (early quartets) of the Beethoven cycle will be released in spring, 2003, and the final volume of the late quartets is to appear in early 2005.

Following the Takacs Quartet's appearance, the 2002-2003 Arts & Issues series concludes with an appearance by Helen Thomas - a fixture of the White House pressroom for more than 40 years - on April 8. Thomas will offer her "Wit and Wisdom From the Front Row at the White House."

Tickets for the Takacs Quartet are $16. For ticket information, call 618/650-2626, or, from St. Louis toll-free, 888/328-5168, ext. 2626; visit the series' Web site at www.siue.edu/ARTS_ISSUES; or e-mail jpeeche@siue.edu. Admission includes free parking in the lots behind Katherine Dunham Hall.

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March 17, 2003

Pianist Ian Hobson Continues Recital Series At SIUE-Performing Chopin

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) Renowned concert pianist Ian Hobson will continue his series of recitals at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville-performing the complete solo piano works of Frédéric Chopin-at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, April 1-2, in SIUE's Katherine Dunham Hall theater.

These two concerts are final editions of a nine-recital series performed since fall on campus by Hobson. The series, "Frédéric Chopin: Evolution of a Genius," has been presented chronologically, following stages in the Polish composer's life and career. The final concerts are titled: 1841-1844: "Faltering Health, Breakup with Sand" and 1844-1849: "Last Concerts (Given in the British Isles), Declining Health and Death."

The April 1 recital includes: Allegro de concert in A Major, Op. 46; Prelude in C-sharp Minor, Op. 45; Tarantelle in A-flat Major, Op. 43; Fugue in A Minor; Impromptu in G-flat Major, Op. 51; Scherzo in E Major, Op. 54; Ballade in F Minor, Op. 52; Mazurkas, Op. 56, Nos. 1-3; Nocturnes, Op. 55, Nos. 1-2; Waltz in A Minor; Moderato in E Major; Berceuse in D-flat Major, Op. 57; and Polonaise in A-flat Major, Op. 3.

The April 2 recital includes: Mazurkas, Op. 59, Nos. 1-3; Barcarolle in F-sharp Major, Op. 60; Waltzes, Op. 64, Nos. 1-3; Nocturnes, Op. 62, Nos. 1-2; Mazurkas, Op. 63, Nos. 1-3; Galopp [marquis] in A-flat Major; Polonaise-Fantaisie in A-flat Major, Op. 61; Mazurka in A Minor, Op. 67, No. 4; Mazurka in G Minor, Op. 67, No. 2; Mazurka in F Minor, Op. 68, No. 4; and Sonata in B Minor, Op. 58.

Called one of the greatest pianists of our time, Hobson's programs consistently demonstrate a repertoire that spans centuries and demands a command of styles and scholarly vision. His recordings and recitals encompass a cross section of works.

Hobson also has performed the Chopin and Moscheles concertos at the Bard Music Festival, and has presented recitals in the United States, England, and Europe, featuring diverse works such as Beethoven's complete sonatas, excerpts from Gershwin's Song Book, Schumann's major piano works, Ravel's Gaspard de la nuit, and Prokofiev's Sonata No. 7, to name a few.

Tickets are $7; students and senior citizens, $6. For ticket information, call the SIUE Department of Music, (618) 650-3900.

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March 17, 2003

No Taming of the 'Shrewd: The 'Virgin Queen' is a Model for Modern Politics

(EDWARDSVILLE) The country was torn between two factions. Its leader, known as both flirtatious and a shrewd politician, was continually forced to refute scandalous rumors and character assaults while holding the country together…elements of a very modern story. But, the story of Queen Elizabeth is more than 400 years old.

Scholars from Canada, Great Britain and across the U.S. will gather at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville to celebrate the life of Elizabeth on the 400th anniversary of the end of her reign. "Elizabeth R., an interdisciplinary conference celebrating Her Life and Reign," is scheduled for March 21 and 22 in the Morris Center.

Daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, Elizabeth ascended to the throne in 1558 during turbulent times for the nation and the monarchy. Dissension between Catholics and Protestants had split the country. Her predecessor, her half-sister, Mary, had drained the royal treasury. France and Spain posed direct threats to the security of the realm.

"She not only successful managed these threats to the kingdom, but England flourished under her reign," said John Pendergast, assistant professor of English Language and Literature at SIUE. "She was a brilliant politician both within the political framework of her country and on the international stage."

Known as "The Virgin Queen," Elizabeth never took a husband, but repeatedly used the possibility of marriage to gain favor with leaders of nations, only to withdraw the possibility when the need for favor had passed. In fact, she claimed only one husband, "namely the kingdom of England," as Elizabeth is quoted.

"There also is speculation that she had seen her father marry and divorce several times, and have two of his ex-wives beheaded, or that she feared childbirth, which often was fatal in her time," Pendergast said. "Either or both of these thoughts might have deterred marriage."

Art, fashion and literature (including the works of Shakespeare, Marlowe and Spenser) blossomed under her reign. She defeated the Spanish Armada, which was then the most powerful military force in the world (after angering King Philip II by rejecting him as a suitor). She successfully quieted the unrest between Catholics and Protestants - although she repeatedly escaped assassination plots by Catholic factions. One of those plots was endorsed by Mary, for which she was eventually executed. "Good Queen Bess" ruled for 45 years and was the last of the Tudor lineage.

"As with any great leader and historical figure, the person's body of accomplishments becomes the subject of exhaustive study," Pendergast said. "But with Elizabeth, there also is a great deal of fascination and discussion about her literal body.

"Was she a virgin? Are the rumors of many secret lovers true? There is no question that she used her femininity to her advantage. Early in her life she was considered very flirtatious. Late in her reign, when members of Parliament repeatedly insisted she marry, she responded with great annoyance and that's when she spoke the famous quote about being married to the throne."

The varied opinions and accomplishments of Queen Elizabeth are obvious among the titles of the presentations at the Elizabeth R. conference, including: "Accusation, Anxiety, and the Aging Body of Elizabeth I;" "The Legend of Chastity;" "The Queen's Metamorphic Body;" "The Portrayal of Female Rulers in the Early Modern Fairy Tales;" and a one-woman staging of "Elizabeth in Her Own Words."

"We're bringing together some of the world's most knowledgeable Elizabethan scholars," Pendergast said, "to consider a topic the world remains fascinated with today. There not only is a great volume of scholarly study of Elizabethan England, but also the very modern fascination with The Royal Family."

More information the conference is available on the web at www.siue.edu/~jpender.

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March 17, 2003

SIUE's 'An Evening In Vienna' Set For March 29 At Sunset Hills CC

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) Wine, song, and gourmet delicacies are some of the highlights to be offered at An Evening in Vienna, presented March 29 by the Department of Music and the Friends of Music, a support organization for the department.

The festivities are set to begin at 6 p.m. at Sunset Hills Country Club in Edwardsville. The musical gala also offers desserts and a variety of live music for dancing and listening by the SIUE Symphony Orchestra and the SIUE Concert Jazz Band, featuring SIUE music students, as well as several ensembles of faculty and students featuring a variety of music. Also featured will be "showcase recitals" by SIUE students performing solo and chamber music in a variety of styles

A silent auction will be conducted featuring products and services from area businesses and organizations. Proceeds from the event benefit the Friends of Music Scholarship Fund. Brenda Fedak, president of the Friends group, said the event is the largest fund-raiser the group conducts. "An Evening in Vienna has become a tradition in the St. Louis area," Fedak said. "The money raised through this annual event helps fund a large part of our scholarship program.

"These scholarships enable the Department of Music to recruit talented students who might otherwise not have an opportunity to attend SIUE."

Tickets are $80 per person and are available through the Office of Conferences and Institutes, (618) 650-2660, or, from St. Louis toll-free, (888) 328-5168, Ext. 2660.

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March 19, 2003

SIU/SDM Class of 2003 Ranks Fourth in Nation on National Board Exams for Second Consecutive Year

(ALTON, Ill.) - Calling it "a remarkable and noteworthy achievement," Ann Boyle, acting dean of the Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine, has announced that for the third time in the past five years, students of the dental school have ranked as one of the top five U.S. dental schools in test scores on their National Board Dental Exams Part II. For the second consecutive year, the SIU/SDM students have ranked fourth nationally.

"This speaks volumes about the hard work and commitment of our students and our faculty," said Boyle. "The test scores are evidence of the student's genuine interest in mastering their course work, and the quality of our educational program."

Passing the National Board Dental Exam Part II is a requirement for licensure in the United States. "The scores are indicative of the measure of student preparedness, as well as the quality of the SIU dental school," Boyle said.

Historically, students from the SIU dental school in Alton score high nationally on the Part II exams. Overall, the Class of 2003 achieved the highest overall class average ever for the school. Boyle noted that this year's scores continue a positive trend on board scores.

"For the past seven years, our students have consistently ranked in the top quarter of the nation's dental schools, and now the top five for the third time in five years," said Boyle. "In effect, the bar is higher now at the SIU School of Dental Medicine."

Additionally, the Class of 2003 students earned a 100-percent pass rate. SIU/SDM students have earned the highest possible pass rate on four of the past six exams. They have earned a 95-percent or better pass rate for the past ten years.

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March 24, 2003

Several Illinois Residents Are Recipients Of SIUE Kimmel Award

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) Several Southwestern Illinois residents will receive Kimmel Community Service Awards at the April 3 Kimmel Leadership Awards Banquet, sponsored by Southern Illinois University Edwardsville and the Belleville News-Democrat.

The annual award was established to recognize outstanding community members for dedication and contributions to community volunteer service as exemplified by Carol Kimmel, a former member of the SIU Board of Trustees, who for many years gave freely of her time and talent to volunteerism.

There are six award categories: education, social service-social welfare, environmental and civic betterment, regional leadership, agency-organizational concerns, and special populations.

Those nominated for the Kimmel Community Service Award must have been a resident of Illinois or Missouri for at least two years, and volunteered for at least one agency, organization, or business for at least two or more continuous years.

In addition, nominees must have demonstrated a variety of community service contributions for an extended period and demonstrated outstanding voluntary community service, as well as a commitment to the citizens of Illinois or Missouri; and must document leadership roles and responsibilities.

This year's winners are:

Regional Leadership: James Maher of Smithton.

Environmental-Civic Betterment: Wayne Schlosser of Belleville.

Social Service-Social Welfare: Rev. Obie Rush of East St. Louis.

Special Populations: Prentice B. Johnson (deceased), formerly of East St. Louis.

Agency/Organizational Concerns: Jan Goodwin of Alton.

Tickets for the April 3 banquet, scheduled in Meridian Ballroom of SIUE's Morris University Center, are $30 per person. For more information, call the SIUE Office of Conferences and Institutes, (618) 650-2660, or, from St. Louis toll-free, (888) 328-5168, Ext. 2660.

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March 24, 2003

Admission, Housing Deadlines Approaching for Incoming SIUE Freshmen

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) Southern Illinois University Edwardsville's eight-year growth trend is expected to continue in the fall; freshmen hoping to be admitted to SIUE should submit their application no later than May 31. The deadline for all other undergraduates is August 4. Students wishing to live on campus should apply for housing by May 1.

"Although fall semester is still five months away, the deadline for freshmen admission - May 31 - is approaching," said Boyd Bradshaw, acting assistant vice chancellor for enrollment. "Early projections indicate that our enrollment growth will continue in the fall, as will the demand for on-campus housing."

SIUE has grown from 10,938 students in 1994 to 12,708 last fall.

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March 24, 2003

SIUE Student From Pocahontas To Become Intern For The FBI

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) Becoming a clinical psychologist where she would have dealt with "everyday phobias" is not an option for Southern Illinois University Edwardsville student Lisa Gooley of Pocahontas. She prefers delving into the criminal mind and that yearning has landed her an internship with the FBI.

Gooley already has completed one internship with the Illinois State Police and, after a taste of law enforcement, she is taking her career choice a step further. "The one thing I don't want is a boring career," said the 20-year-old high achiever.

She is treasurer of Psi Chi, the Psychology Honor Society; president of the local chapter of the Golden Key International Honour Society, for students who excel academically and who are involved in community service; a Dean's Scholar; active in the university's Student Leadership Development Program, through which she won the Kimmel Scholarship; past president of the SIUE Volleyball Club; a mentor for the Madison County Juvenile Probation office; and a member of the newly formed U.S. Search and Rescue Dog Association.

"I'm an analytical person and I need to be intellectually challenged," she said. When she graduates in spring she will have two degrees-Psychology and Criminal Justice. She aspires to be a homicide investigator for the FBI. And, eventually she'd like to be part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

"Law enforcement with the FBI would be an exciting career, one in which I try to outsmart criminals," Gooley said. Her internship duties include assisting in research projects with the FBI's Behavioral Science Unit in Quantico, Va.

"I'll be part of a team of agents, helping them with research and maintaining databases. I probably won't be working on specific cases, but I still had to go through a high-security clearance, which included a polygraph test, an extensive background check, and an interview," she said.

Gooley acknowledges that an internship won't guarantee her a job with the FBI after graduation, but may be an entrée to law enforcement career. "I would like to go to graduate school and then consider my options. In law enforcement, it's good to know all of its aspects. It makes you a better team player.

"At the very least, working at Quantico will be a fascinating experience."

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March 24, 2003

Two Area Residents Win Kimmel Awards In Two Categories

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) Two Belleville area residents have been named recipients of the 2003 Kimmel Community Service Award in two categories. The awards are sponsored by Southern Illinois University Edwardsville and the Belleville News-Democrat.

Jim Maher, of Smithton, won in the regional leadership category, while Wayne Schlosser, of Belleville, won in the environment and civic betterment category. Both will be honored with other recipients at the April 3 Kimmel Leadership Awards Banquet at SIUE.

Those nominated for the Kimmel Award must have demonstrated a variety of community service contributions for an extended period; demonstrated outstanding voluntary community service, as well as a commitment to the citizens of Illinois or Missouri; and must document leadership roles and responsibilities.

Maher, financial advisor in charge of the regional Merrill Lynch office in Swansea, is founder of the Southern Illinois Charitable Giving Council (SICGC), an organization dedicated to assisting non-profit agencies in the region by providing leadership and guidance in fund-raising efforts. The organization conducts seminars for civic and not-for-profit leaders, board members and professional advisors, with the purpose of educating the people of Southwestern Illinois to increase charitable giving.

In addition, the 37-year-old Maher has been very active with the American Red Cross, the Southwestern Illinois College Foundation Board, the Greater East St. Louis Community Fund Inc., the St. Louis Agri-Business Club, the United Way, the YMCA Endowment Committee, the SIUE Planned Giving Council Advisory Committee, and Focus St. Louis, to name just a few.

"My goal as a volunteer is to leave a lasting imprint on every project I touch," Maher said. "The way I measure my service is two-fold: first, the project's outcome-was it successful from a third party's view? and, second, are there others who now share your passion? When others associated with the project now share your passion for both the project and the project's mission, you know you've made a difference.

"It is our responsibility to replicate, improve, and pass on acts of goodwill to others."

Schlosser, 72, a retired award-winning advertising and public relations executive, has spent more than 50 years in the service of volunteerism. A lifelong resident of Belleville, Schlosser recently was awarded an AARP/Illinois Carnation Award in recognition of his continuous and generous contributions to the citizens of Illinois.

He has volunteered with several organizations, including the United Way of Greater St. Louis, the Okaw Valley Council of the Boy Scouts, the Greater Belleville Chamber of Commerce, Junior Achievement, the Violence Prevention Center, the YMCA of Southwestern Illinois, the Area Agency on Aging, St. Clair County Health Department, and the Rotary Club of St. Clair County [West], to name just a few.

"I have tried to follow a life-long commitment to volunteer service to my community just as my father and grandfather did before me," Schlosser said. "During all these years, seeing needed programs come to fruition was gratifying, but an added benefit was meeting and working with so many dedicated volunteers. My goal in every volunteer assignment is to assist in building better public awareness for the many vital services of each organization, and also help to develop recognition programs for their representatives.

"I sincerely appreciate the support my family through the years, enabling me to help others."

Tickets for the April 3 Kimmel banquet, scheduled in Meridian Ballroom of SIUE's Morris University Center, are $30 per person. For more information about tickets or about ordering them, call the SIUE Office of Conferences and Institutes, (618) 650-2660, or, from St. Louis toll-free, (888) 328-5168, Ext. 2660.

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March 24, 2003

SIUE Student From Florissant Wins Kimmel Scholarship

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) Preston E. Williams, of Florissant, Mo., a sophomore majoring in Liberal Studies at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, has been named recipient of the university's 2003 Carol Kimmel Scholarship. The scholarship program is co-sponsored by the Belleville News-Democrat.

The annual scholarship was established to recognize students for their outstanding leadership and community volunteer service contributions, in addition to academic excellence. It is named for Kimmel, a former member of the SIU Board of Trustees, who for many years donated freely of her time and talent to volunteerism.

Criteria for winning the scholarship includes maintaining a 3.0 cumulative grade point average and demonstrating volunteer contributions within the last two years in leadership, service, and/or citizenship, including leadership in a student organization or at least one elected office; and more than 30 hours of nonpaid service to a community agency or community organization. The scholarship provides one full year of tuition at the SIUE in-state rate.

A licensed minister, Williams has been very active since last year as president of the Maranatha Christian Ministry, a student organization on the SIUE campus. As a minister/mentor with the Shalom Church City of Peace in St. Louis, Williams has conducted worship services, performed youth counseling and mentoring, and worked with other ministers at the church to provide activities for youngsters.

He also has volunteered with the SIUE Student Leadership Development Program (SLDP), helping prepare food baskets for needy families. Also through the SLDP, Williams has worked with elementary students as a tutor for the Open Doors program and has performed maintenance and custodial services for Salus Place, a recovery and rehabilitation home for former drug addicts and those with HIV. He also has served as a student mentor for the SIUE Office of Special Services in its "Lifting As We Climb Program." In addition, Williams has been active with the SIUE Gospel Choir.

Quoting John Maxwell, author and motivational speaker, Williams said "leadership has less to do with position than it has with disposition," when he refers to his volunteer activities. "For nearly two years I've held a 'disposition' of leadership," Williams said. "This 'disposition' has been and is one of dedication, humility, and discipline.

"As a licensed minister and community servant, it is my desire to arrive at a position in which I can help others to reach their maximum potential," Williams said. "And, I believe education is a primary necessity in arriving at that position."

Williams will be recognized Thursday, April 3, at the Kimmel Leadership Awards Banquet. Tickets for the banquet, scheduled in Meridian Ballroom of SIUE's Morris Center, are $30 per person. For more information about tickets or about ordering them, call the SIUE Office of Conferences and Institutes, (618) 650-2660, or, from St. Louis toll-free, (888) 328-5168, Ext. 2660.

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March 24, 2003

Alton Resident Wins Kimmel Community Award In Organizations Category

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) Jan Goodwin of Alton, an active volunteer with several organizations in the area, is recipient of the 2003 Kimmel Community Service Award in the agency-organizational concerns category. The awards are sponsored by Southern Illinois University Edwardsville and the Belleville News-Democrat.

The annual award was established to recognize outstanding community members for dedication and contributions to community volunteer service.

Those nominated for the Kimmel Award must have demonstrated a variety of community service contributions for an extended period; demonstrated outstanding voluntary community service, as well as a commitment to the citizens of Illinois or Missouri; and must document leadership roles and responsibilities.

Goodwin helped establish a hearing-impaired service at Free Will Baptist Church in South Roxana. In addition, she developed the skill of ventriloquism in which she uses her "partner" Spencer, a puppet in a wheelchair, to teach and entertain at nursing homes, scouting events, libraries, and 4-H groups. "My philosophy toward my service using Spencer is: If I can make someone laugh, at least for that moment they forget about the pain, sadness, or suffering they may be experiencing.

"I'm also able to educate in a unique way," Goodwin said, "with the subjects changing to match the circumstances. I might talk about self-esteem, church-related subjects, the importance of reading, or about people with disabilities. I sometimes call myself an 'edu-trainer,' " she said. "I think it is a great way for people to learn … education while being entertained."

In addition to working with her church and ventriloquist activities, Goodwin also has been active with IMPACT Inc., for which she designed and helped construct a new accessible kitchen, and with the United Way of Greater St. Louis. She also served two years as president of the Alton YWCA. "But, I can't just sit on a board of directors and make a decision," Goodwin said. "I have to be physically involved as well. God's best gift to me was my hands and I have to be able to use them for good.

"Whether it's using them to sign for the hearing-impaired, pull a string inside a dummy, tear down walls, or paint pictures on them, I want to use the gifts I was given to help others."

Tickets for the April 3 Kimmel banquet, scheduled in Meridian Ballroom of SIUE's Morris University Center, are $30 per person. For more information about tickets or about ordering them, call the SIUE Office of Conferences and Institutes, (618) 650-2660, or, from St. Louis toll-free, (888) 328-5168, Ext. 2660.

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March 24, 2003

Two East St. Louis Residents, One Posthumously, Win Kimmel Awards

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) Two East St. Louis church leaders, one who died recently, have been named recipients of the 2003 Kimmel Community Service Award in two categories. The awards are sponsored by Southern Illinois University Edwardsville and the Belleville News-Democrat.

The Rev. Dr. Obie Rush won in the social service-social welfare category, while the late Prentice Johnson, who died in December, won in the special populations category. Both will be honored with other recipients at the April 3 Kimmel Leadership Awards Banquet at SIUE.

The annual award was established to recognize outstanding community members for dedication and contributions to community volunteer service.

Those nominated for the Kimmel Award must have demonstrated a variety of community service contributions for an extended period; demonstrated outstanding voluntary community service, as well as a commitment to the citizens of Illinois or Missouri; and must document leadership roles and responsibilities.

Johnson, very active for more than 30 years with the Mt. Missionary Baptist Church in East St. Louis, took charge of the church's food pantry and daily meals program, and was instrumental in helping it grow to an organization that not only feeds the hungry but also provides clothing, blankets, toys for children, and a mentoring program for individuals and families. Johnson died in December.

He also served in several other volunteer positions with the church, such as deacon, trustee, maintenance man, repairman, buildings and grounds supervisor, Sunday school teacher, and new membership class instructor.

Marlene Smoot, a Mt. Zion food pantry volunteer and nominator of Johnson for the Kimmel Award, said Johnson made a significant impact on the community. "Mr. Johnson believed that it was important for us to be our 'brother's keeper' to the extent of personal sacrifice," Smoot wrote in her nomination letter. "Those of us who had the privilege to share his burden in volunteer service, for the less fortunate people who came by, believe that he should be honored … "

Rush, who has been pastor of St. Paul Baptist Church in East St. Louis for more than 40 years, is known as a man who has devoted his life to helping the less fortunate. He is credited with starting the Ministers United Against Human Suffering, an organization which operates a shelter for those in need. In recent years, Rush organized the Ascension Development Corp. (ADC), a non-profit organization that is dedicated to raising money for a 60-unit senior citizen complex in the south side of East St. Louis.

"If I am to serve God, I must also serve His people," Rush said. "I can't see the ills of my fellow man and not do something to cure those ills. The shelter has helped countless families in the past 20 years and has given them hope for the future. As for the work with ADC, it is my fervent hope that in the near future senior citizens in East St. Louis will have clean, safe housing."

Tickets for the April 3 Kimmel banquet, scheduled in Meridian Ballroom of SIUE's Morris University Center, are $30 per person. For more information about tickets or about ordering them, call the SIUE Office of Conferences and Institutes, (618) 650-2660, or, from St. Louis toll-free, (888) 328-5168, Ext. 2660.

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March 26, 2003

SIUE Student Disability Support Services Sponsors 5K Roll/Run/Walk March 30

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) - Southern Illinois University Edwardsville's disability support services - a University program that offers a range of resources to support students with disabilities - and the SIUE track team are sponsoring a 5-kilometer roll/run/walk on Sunday, March 30, as part of the second annual "Celebrating Abilities Week."

The course - which begins and ends at the Madison County Transit Center at the intersection of North Main and Hillsboro in downtown Edwardsville - winds through surrounding historic neighborhoods and is open to both competitive racers (wheelchair or runner) and recreational exercisers (wheelchair, jogger or walker). Wheelchair participants will start 7:55 a.m.; all others at 8 a.m.

Advanced entry fees are $10 for the general public, $5, SIUE students, and must be postmarked by March 20. Late- and day-of race entries are $15 for the general public, $10, SIUE students. Entry forms are available by phoning 618/650-3726.

Proceeds from the race will go to benefit New Horizons - an SIUE organization for students with disabilities - and the SIUE track team. For more information, contact Jane Floyd-Hendey at 618/650-3782 or Darryl Frerker at 618/650-2877.

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March 27, 2003

PAPA Professor Wins 2003 SIUE Teaching Excellence Award; Two Others Win Teaching Recognition Awards

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) Dennis Hostetler, professor of Public Administration and Policy Analysis at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, is recipient of the 2003 SIUE Teaching Excellence Award. The award is the highest honor that can be awarded an SIUE faculty member.

Hostetler will receive a $2,000 award at SIUE's April 13 Honors Convocation, and a plaque of recognition at the May 10 spring commencement. The committee also awarded Teaching Recognition Awards to Kay Gaehle, a lecturer in the SIUE School of Nursing, and to Paul Brunkow, an assistant professor of Biological Sciences. Each will receive a $500 award at the convocation.

Nominees were considered by members of a university-wide committee which made the final selections. Hostetler was praised by the committee as "a key" faculty member in the introduction and dissemination of technologies at SIUE, such as the WebCT software package, to aid student learning both inside and outside the classroom.

The committee also said Hostetler's teaching is characterized by "sensitivity" to the needs of his students and colleagues. "He stimulates active learning by providing a structured, non-threatening environment within the classroom, which supports the open exchange of ideas; he responds dynamically to student feedback as it is given."

Hostetler, who joined the SIUE faculty in 1975, earned a bachelor's at the University of Montana, and a master's and a doctorate in Political Science from the University of Iowa.

The committee further noted that Hostetler transforms the process of learning from "faculty centered" to "student centered" (and) "garners high praise from both students and colleagues."

Brunkow, in his sixth year of teaching at SIUE, received a bachelor of science in Zoology from the University of Washington and a doctorate in Zoology at Arizona State University. His teaching has been described as "challenging," "interesting," and "enlightening." Brunkow said he still is "excited" about coming to class.

He describes his own teaching as "a dynamic process" with a main goal of helping "dispel the fear associated with advanced biology courses."

Gaehle, in her fourth year at SIUE, earned a master of science in Nursing at Saint Louis University. She has clinical experience in medical/surgical nursing, acute care, and pediatrics, and she focuses her research on medication administration safety and breast cancer detection. Her students describe her as "engaging, entertaining, and informative." The committee noted Gaehle's teaching has been characterized as sensitive to the needs of students.

"She fosters engaged and active learning by providing a structured, non-threatening environment within the classroom and in clinical experiences," the committee said. One of her students said of her: "Kay Gaehle has a high degree of respect for all students inside and outside the classroom. She includes reasoning and examples behind all concepts so that students learn processes, not just memorizing."

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March 27, 2003

SIUE Kimmel Leadership Center To Offer People's Law School In April

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) Eight free sessions with legal experts will be offered during April as part of the People's Law School at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. The sessions are co-sponsored by the SIUE Student Legal Services Advisory Board, the Madison County Bar Association, and the Illinois State Bar Association.

Two sessions will be conducted on each of four Wednesdays-April 2, 9, 16, and 23-from 7-8 and 8-9 p.m., all in Room 2002 of SIUE's Morris University Center. The sessions are open to the public. A complete schedule follows:

April 2-The Courts and How They Operate-The Hon. Dan Stack, circuit judge of the Third Judicial Circuit; Traffic and DUI Citations-Edwardsville attorney Ron Slemmer.

April 9-Bankruptcy and Debt Relief-Granite City attorney Dennis J. Orsey; Wills and Durable Powers of Attorney-Highland attorney Matt Homann.

April 16-Landlord/Tenant Rights and Responsibilities-Alton attorney Barb Goeben; Buying/Selling a Home: How a Lawyer Can Help-Granite City attorney Phillip Theis.

April 23-Juvenile Courts and Termination of Parental Rights-Granite City attorney Morgan Scoggins; Collecting On a Debt-Edwardsville attorney Lawrence Taliana.

Complimentary parking will be available in Visitors' Lot B (behind the Morris Center); light refreshments will be served. For more information, call the Kimmel Leadership Center, (618) 650-2686.

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March 27, 2003

Award-winning White House Reporter, Helen Thomas, to Speak on SIUE's 'Arts & Issues' Series April 8

Columnist to Offer 'Wit & Wisdom from the Front Row at the White House'

(EDWARDSVILLE, Ill.) - For a woman, it hasn't been easy getting to the front row of the White House briefing room. But with grit, talent, and a fair amount of chutzpah, award-winning reporter and columnist Helen Thomas broke barriers and made it to that seat. Outspoken, direct and a fixture of the White House press corps since the Presidency of John F. Kennedy, Thomas will offer "Wit and Wisdom from the Front Row at the White House," Tuesday, April 8, at 7:30 p.m., in the Meridian Ballroom of Southern Illinois University Edwardsville's Morris University Center as part of the University's Arts & Issues series.

"With the world events that are unfolding, Ms. Thomas' appearance at SIUE could not possibly be more timely and relevant," said John Peecher, assistant director of development for the College of Arts and Sciences and coordinator of the Arts & Issues series. "Her perspectives are likely to be thought-provoking, fascinating, and, undoubtedly, challenging."

After 57 years as a correspondent for United Press International (UPI) - including an appointment in 1974 as the news organization's White House bureau chief -Thomas now writes as a columnist for Hearst newspapers. She joined UPI and the Washington press corps in 1943 and for 12 years wrote radio news for UPI. Eventually she covered the news of the federal government, including the Department of Justice, the FBI, Health and Human Services, and Capitol Hill.

In November 1960, she began covering then President-elect John F. Kennedy, following him to the White House in January 1961 as a member of the UPI team. It was during this first White House assignment that Thomas began closing Presidential news conferences with "Thank you, Mr. President."

Thomas was the only woman print journalist traveling with President Nixon to China during his breakthrough trip in January 1972. Since then she has traveled to China with former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and Presidents Ford, Reagan, and George H. Bush. She has the distinction of having traveled around the world several times with Presidents Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan and George H. Bush, during the course of which she covered every economic summit.

Among Thomas' accomplishments are: having served as president of the Women's National Press Club; being the first woman officer of the National Press club; becoming the first woman officer of the White House Correspondents Association and its first woman president; and receiving the 1998 International Women's Media Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award. In November 1976 she was named by the World Almanac as one of the 25 most influential women in America.

"There can be no question, Helen Thomas has been a trailblazer for women journalists," said Peecher.

Additionally, Thomas was the first recipient of the Helen Thomas Lifetime Achievement Award established by the White House Correspondents Association, and honored by President and Mrs. Clinton at the association's annual dinner in 1998.

Thomas has received 30 honorary doctorate degrees from many colleges and universities including Brown, Northeastern University, and Michigan State University. She has delivered lectures and speeches on the White House and the Presidency throughout the country and is the author of Dateline White House and Front Row at the White House.

Tickets for Helen Thomas' appearance are $8. For ticket information, call 618/650-2626, or, from St. Louis toll-free, 888/328-5168, ext. 2626; visit the series' Web site at www.siue.edu/ARTS_ISSUES; or e-mail jpeeche@siue.edu. Admission includes free parking with the presentation of a ticket stub in the lots behind the Morris University Center or Katherine Dunham Hall.

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March 30, 2003

Twentieth Annual SIUE Summer Writing Camp Set For June, July

(EDWARDSVILLE, ILL.) The 20th Annual Summer Writing Day Camp at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville has been set for two sessions Monday through Friday, June 16-27 and July 7-18.

Enrollment per session is limited to 50 students, ages eight through 18, according to retired Assistant Professor Eugene Violette, of the Department of English Language and Literature, who has been director of the writing camp since its inception.

The camps are open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., with several hours of classroom development activity, plus recreation periods for softball, swimming, volleyball, bowling, billiards, board games, and nature exploration, among others. In addition, older students will have opportunities to explore other aspects of campus life.

Violette said writing periods have an excellent pupil-teacher ratio-about eight to one-with development of skills articulating thought in the sentence, the paragraph, and the short essay, as well as, by means of collaborative effort, in such creative forms as drama and fiction. Students from the fifth grade and higher will use computers extensively in the composition process, but participants do not need prior experience with computers to do well in the program.

He also pointed out that individual instruction in grammar, spelling, and punctuation, is provided as needed but he also said this is not the total objective of the program. Violette will be assisted at the day camp by recreational counselors, as well as area elementary and secondary teachers who have participated in The Mississippi Valley Writing Project at SIUE, which is an affiliate of the National Writing Project, or are current or former university lecturers of the SIUE Department of English Language and Literature.

The fee for either of the day camp sessions is $180, which includes a non-refundable $15 enrollment fee upon registration. The $165 balance is due no later than June 13. For more information, call the SIUE Department of English Language and Literature, (618) 650-2060, or, from St. Louis toll-free, (888) 328-5168, Ext. 2060.

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