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College of Arts & Sciences

Prof Name: Various professors within the Department of Anthropology *
Course No. ANTH 111
Course Title: Introduction to Anthropology
Description of sustainability aspects:
Sustainability-related issues incorporated into the course include: food production systems, social inequalities, and globalization.

Prof Name: Jennifer Rehg, Assistant Professor Department of Anthropology *
Course No. ANTH 170
Course Title: Conservation and Sustainability: Local and Global Perspectives
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course examines key issues related to conservation and sustainable use on local and global scales, including: human population growth, ecosystem quality, biodiversity, food production, water use, pollution, and harvesting of natural resources. The course also examines the effects of human perspectives and behaviors on both local and global ecosystems and resources, and investigates ways to improve conservation of resources and develop approaches for sustainable use.

Prof Name: Jennifer Rehg, Assistant Professor Department of Anthropology *
Course No. ANTH 367
Course Title: Primatology
Description of sustainability aspects:
Course focuses on all aspects of nonhuman primates, including coverage of primate conservation and conservation of tropical habitats, and interaction between humans and nonhumans.

Prof Name: Jennifer Rehg, Assistant Professor Department of Anthropology *
Course No. ANTH 428
Course Title: Primates, Conservation, and Tropical Environments
Description of sustainability aspects:
Course focuses on relationships between humans, nonhuman primates, and environments, including deforestation and habitat alteration, and the bushmeat trade.

Prof Name: Peter Minchin, PhD., Assistant Professor Department of Biological Sciences
Course No. BIOL 111
Course Title: Contemporary Biology
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course covers issues including the limits of human population growth, sustainable agriculture, and consumer choices that can increase sustainability.

Prof Name: William Retzlaff, PhD., Assistant Professor and Chair Department of Biological Sciences *
Course No. BIOL 111-FR
Course Title: University Campuses - Sustainable Leaders for the 21st Century
Description of sustainability aspects:
The course examines current sustainability and environmental issues and evaluates how students, faculty, and staff on college campuses may develop and implement unique sustainable solutions. The course also examines sustainable practices on campuses that are noted for their "green" or sustainable efforts.

Prof Name: Zhi-Qing Lin, PhD., Director and Associate Professor Environmental Sciences Program *
Course No. BIOL 464/BIOL 564/ENSC 550
Course Title: Applied Ecology
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course explores the ways in which ecological science can be applied to solving some of the most important environmental problems facing the world today, such as: the conservation of species, wetland restoration, and mitigation of environmental impacts. The course draws together major topics in environmental and resource management that have traditionally been presented across several different courses. This provides a balanced perspective into the difficult conflicts and choices made in this field.

Prof Name: Zhi-Qing Lin, PhD., Director and Associate Professor Environmental Sciences Program *
Course No. BIOL 468/ENSC 540
Course Title: Pollution Ecology
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course covers a wide range of topics in the environmental sciences, with particular emphasis on the transport and fate of pollutants in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The course also examines the influence of physical, chemical, and biological processes on the transport of pollutants in the environment. Other topics include the ecological effects of selected environmental pollution problems; particularly those related to chemical contaminants. This course provides the base scientific knowledge that is essential for assessing the impact of pollution on the structure and function of ecosystems.

Prof Name: Peter Minchin, PhD., Assistant Professor Department of Biological Sciences
Course No. BIOL 490/590
Course Title: Conservation Biology
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course analyzes the human impacts on ecosystem function and biodiversity, sustainable management of ecosystems, sustainable exploitation (e.g., timber harvesting, fisheries), and the selection and management of reserves.

Prof Name: Richard Essner, PhD., Assistant Professor Department of Biological Sciences
Course No. BIOL 490/590 sec. 002
Course Title: Wildlife Management
Description of sustainability aspects:
The course provides an understanding of the basic principles of wildlife ecology, conservation, and management. Key ecological concepts covered include: the effects of habitat loss, wildlife behavior, disease, and predation on wildlife populations. The course describes how culture, politics, economics, and science interact to effect wildlife policy.

Prof Name: Richard Essner, PhD., Assistant Professor Department of Biological Sciences
Course No. BIOL 490/590 sec. 003
Course Title: Ornithology
Description of sustainability aspects:
Key concepts covered in lecture include avian ecology and conservation biology. Laboratory projects include conducting an avian census, habitat improvement in conjunction with the Gardens at SIUE, and field trips to state, national, and international parks, sanctuaries, and wildlife refuges.

Prof Name: William Retzlaff, PhD., Assistant Professor and Chair Department of Biological Sciences *
Course No. ENSC 220
Course Title: Principles of Environmental Science
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course introduces basic application of system approaches to science and policy analysis of air, soil, and water environments, land use, energy supplies, and other resources using biological, ecological, physical, and chemical principles.

Prof Name: William Retzlaff, PhD., Assistant Professor and Chair Department of Biological Sciences *
Course No. ENSC 220 L
Course Title: Principles of Environmental Science Lab
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course provides exercises to introduce system analysis of air, soil, and water environments, land use, energy supplies, and other resources using biological, ecological, physical, and chemical principles.

Prof Name: Zhi-Qing Lin, PhD., Director and Associate Professor Environmental Sciences Program *
Course No. ENSC 340
Course Title: Ecosystem Management and Sustainability
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course introduces basic concepts and principles of natural resource management with an emphasis on sustainable ecosystems. Selected ecosystem management issues are covered including: genetic diversity in ecosystem management, landscape-level conservation, single-species land management, and the skill and art of keeping fragile ecosystems in balance. Different case studies are presented to demonstrate how ecological concepts and principles can be applied to the sustainable management of ecosystems.

Prof Name: Nicholas P. Guehlstorf, Ph. D., Associate Professor Department of Political Science
Course No. ENSC 402
Course Title: Environmental Law
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the legal system and procedures relating to environmental laws, rules, programs and regulations. More specifically, the course addresses: the underlying kinds of resource and consumption problems that have resulted in environmental pollution or deterioration; the political context in which environmental policies have been formulated; the regulatory approaches which have emerged from various objectives; the administrative procedures required by law or judicial decision to deal with various problems; and the dynamic interests at play in arenas where these policies are made and implemented. In addition to exploring the governmental pattern to control the use of resources and address the resulting pollution, this course discusses the scientific background necessary for understanding each law of environmental protection and resource management.

Prof Name: William Retzlaff, PhD., Assistant Professor and Chair Department of Biological Sciences *
Course No. ENSC 510
Course Title: Advanced Environmental Sciences and Policy
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course analyzes skills used in environmental sciences and policy; coupling of science and policy in the discussion of local, regional, and global environmental concerns.

Prof Name: Nicholas P. Guehlstorf, Ph.D., Associate Professor Department of Political Science
Course No. ENSC 511
Course Title: Environmental Policy
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course provides a theoretical understanding of the policymaking processes through which modern societies attempt to cope with environmental and natural resource problems. The primary focus is on the American system, but a limited number of topics relating to international environmental issues are also explored. General themes include the relationship between political processes and policy outcomes, the correlation of environmental politics and science, and the need to balance trade-offs between legal, economic, political, social and environmental goals.

Prof Name: Zhi-Qing Lin, PhD., Director and Associate Professor Environmental Sciences Program *
Course No. ENSC 545
Course Title: Treatment Wetlands and Phytoremediation
Description of sustainability aspects:
The focus of this course is the use of treatment wetlands and phytoremediation technology to clean up contaminated environments. The course introduces basic concepts and principles on the hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological processes, and the development of different treatment wetlands and phytoremediation systems. Various case studies are given to illustrate the application of the remediation technologies in the cleanup of different polluted environmental substrates, including inorganic and/or organic contaminants in water, sediment, or soil.

Prof Name: Zhi-Qing Lin, PhD., Director and Associate Professor Environmental Sciences Program *
Course No. ENSC 555
Course Title: Agroecology
Description of sustainability aspects:
Agroecology is defined as the application of ecological concepts and principles to the design and management of sustainable agricultural ecosystems. This course provides the theoretical and conceptual framework for the study and analysis of agroecosystems. The course focuses on interactions and interrelationships among the different components of agroecosystems (populations, communities, and ecosystems) to understand the complex factors of the environment as they affect crops, animals, and agricultural production system. Different case studies are discussed to demonstrate how ecology can be applied to sustainable agriculture.

Prof Name: Michael Starr, Associate Professor Department of Geography *
Course No. GEOG 202
Course Title: Resource Use and Management
Description of sustainability aspects:
The primary goal of this course is to increase your general understanding of the natural environment and the historical use patterns by humans of the world's natural resources. We will pursue this goal through a combination of readings, exercises, lectures and discussions, focusing on the 10 most serious environmental problems. In the end, you will better understand the natural environment, human impact upon it, and various conservation strategies designed to address these problems.

Prof Name: Kerry Doyle, Research Associate, Department of Geography *
Course No. GEOG 211
Course Title: Meteorology
Description of sustainability aspects:
Meteorology explores atmospheric mechanisms for heat transfer including the role of humankind in creating heat and its implications. Students learn about atmospheric composition, the greenhouse effect, and atmospheric cycles as a prelude to climatology.

Prof Name: Michael Starr, Associate Professor Department of Geography *
Course No. GEOG 316
Course Title: Introduction to Biogeography
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course is primarily an overview of the field of biogeography, and therefore will focus on the distribution patterns of flora and fauna, as well as the historical and environmental factors that create them. This should both increase your general understanding of the natural environment and how human use impacts are altering the spatial distributions of native species. You will also learn how biogeography may help in the development of conservation strategies.
Prof Name: Kerry Doyle, Research Associate, Department of Geography *
Course No. GEOG 320
Course Title: Cartography
Description of sustainability aspects:
Cartography teaches mapping techniques to identify and predict resource reserves, allocation & consumption as well as externalities (pollution, waste) from human activities.

Prof Name: Michael Starr, Associate Professor Department of Geography *
Course No. GEOG 415
Course Title: Zoogeography
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course will begin with a general review of environmental patterns and processes relevant to the distribution and abundance of vertebrate species. Our focus will then shift to island patterns and processes, including the Theory of Island Biogeography and its application to the conservation and management of animals on all types of islands. Finally, we will focus on the principles of zoogeography, using in-depth analysis of specific animal case studies to better understand and evaluate these general characteristics and principles. In the end, through a combination of readings, lecture and discussion, and field experience, you will better understand the behaviors and roles of animals within the natural environment, and the ways in which biogeography can help develop strategies to address our modern conservation problems.

Prof Name: Michael Starr, Associate Professor Department of Geography *
Course No. GEOG 416
Course Title: Conservation Biogeography
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course will begin with a review of environmental patterns and processes relevant to biodiversity, followed by an in depth analysis of some the principles of biogeography, such as distribution patterns, dispersal processes and the theory of island biogeography. We will then consider various conservation strategies, both past and present, and evaluate their success in maintaining biodiversity. Finally, we will explore the application of modern biogeographic ideas to the conservation of biodiversity from the species level through landscapes. In the end, through a combination of readings, lecture and discussion, and field experience, you will better understand the natural environment, the ways in which humans continue to affect that environment, and strategies to address our modern conservation problems.

Prof Name: Christopher Pearson, Assistant Professor Department of Philosophy
Course No. PHIL 322
Course Title: Environmental Ethics
Description of sustainability aspects:
The course analyzes the meaning of environmental ethics and discusses moral obligations that emerge through complexities of society and the environment to more completely understand the concept.

Prof Name: Christopher Pearson, Assistant Professor Department of Philosophy
Course No. PHIL 323
Course Title: Engineering Ethics
Description of sustainability aspects:
The course focuses on methods to better understand civil and environmental engineers' commitment to sustainable development.

Prof Name: Thomas Foster, PhD., Director and Associate Professor Department of Physics & Sue Wiediger, PhD., Associate Professor Department of Chemistry *
Course No. SCI 451
Course Title: Integrated Science
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course focuses on current interdisciplinary topics in science that contain technological and societal aspects. The primary audience for the course is future high school science teachers. Issues of sustainability are emphasized in areas categorized as "Ocean Health & Economy" and "Renewable Energy".

Prof Name: Lisa C. Welch, PhD., Assistant Professor of Sociology and Graduate Program Director *
Course No. SOC 300
Course Title: Social Problems
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course seeks to develop a framework for interpreting social problems and assessing potential solutions. The problems include: economic inequality and poverty, educational inequality, ensuring quality and affordable health care, and environmental degradation. The course also explores how social structures and institutions shape these social problems, assesses social policies intended to address these problems, and considers alternative solutions. A goal of the course is to promote a critical analysis of persistent social problems and potential solutions in order to inform our responsibilities as citizens.

School of Business

Prof Name: Thomas J. Douglas, Ph.D. Associate Professor School of Business *
Course No. MBA 534
Course Title: Strategic Management
Description of sustainability aspects:
The capstone course in the School of Business Masters of Business Administration (MBA) program dedicates about 20% of its classroom time to modules that engage the students in readings and discussions focused on sustaining the natural environment and the social aspects of ethical decision-making and its overall impacts. The course MBA 534, Strategic Management uses current readings and case analyses to focus the discussions. The principal theme is that organizations (either for profit or not-for-profit) have a major role to play in sustainability and that many firms are providing this type of leadership. In addition, sustainability concepts are interspersed throughout the course in other discussions of the theory and concepts of strategic management.

School of Engineering

Prof Name: Huaguo Zhou, Ph.D. P.E., Assistant Professor Department of Civil Engineering *
Course No. CE 376
Course Title: Introduction of Transportation Engineering
Description of sustainability aspects:
A chapter of this course covers what sustainable transportation is and how it can be supported, the impacts of traffic congestion on a corridor or in a community, transportation's energy problem and ways to alleviate its impacts, the environmental impacts of transportation activities and strategies being proposed to minimize those impacts, how Intelligent transportation system make transportation activities more efficient and less harmful to the environment.

Prof Name: Susan M. Morgan, Ph.D., P.E., Professor and Chair Department of Civil Engineering *
Course No. CE 380
Course Title: Environmental Science and Engineering
Description of sustainability aspects:
The course includes an introduction of sustainability concepts in the field of civil engineering. Specific topics include the waste management hierarchy and life cycle assessment. The course also includes a project on water use and conservation.

Prof Name: Susan M. Morgan, Ph.D., P.E., Professor and Chair Department of Civil Engineering *
Course No. CE 488
Course Title: Hazardous Waste Management
Description of sustainability aspects:
The course develops an understanding of how to reduce and manage hazardous waste and how to reduce the need for remediation. A project on waste reduction is also included.

Prof Name: Susan M. Morgan, Ph.D., P.E., Professor and Chair Department of Civil Engineering *
Course No. CE 493
Course Title: Engineering Design
Description of sustainability aspects:
The course discusses the incorporation of green engineering in project design.

Prof Name: Ryan N. Fries, Ph. D., P.E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering *
Course No. CE 578 (New course no., not in catalog yet, offered this semester as CE592)
Course Title: Intelligent Transportation Systems
Description of sustainability aspects:
Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) are the integrated application of traffic flow principles, advanced sensor, computer, electronics, and communications technologies and management strategies to provide traveler information and increase the safety and efficiency of the surface transportation system. Because it is not feasible to construct additional lanes along most urban freeways due to property costs, managing the existing lanes by using ITS, has become the new paradigm. Thus, instead of continually increasing the size of our transportation systems, ITS promote the improved usage, namely safety and efficiency, and therefore sustainability of such systems. Another example of the sustainability focus includes ITS architectures, which specify how different centers and subsystems communicate within a transportation system. By identifying and defining the communication paths and standards between transportation system entities, future technologies will integrate seamlessly with existing tools, minimizing the difficulties of adopting newer technologies and extending the service life of older technologies. This course does not include sustainability as a separate module; rather it is engrained within each topic.


Prof Name: Susan M. Morgan, Ph.D., P.E., Professor and Chair Department of Civil Engineering *
Course No. CE 588
Course Title: Solid Waste Management
Description of sustainability aspects:
The course develops an understanding of how to reduce and manage nonhazardous solid waste. The course includes a project on waste reduction.

Prof Name: Susan M. Morgan, Ph.D., P.E., Professor and Chair Department of Civil Engineering *
Course No. CE 589
Course Title: Industrial Materials and Waste
Description of sustainability aspects:
The course covers waste management alternatives and issues related to industrial materials and waste. Specific topics include: pollution prevention, facility assessments/audits, and environmental management systems. Safety issues related to hazardous materials and waste are also covered.

Prof Name: Jianpeng Zhou, Ph.D. P.E. BCEE, Associate Professor & Graduate Program Director Department of Civil Engineering *
Course No. CE 596
Course Title: Sustainable Engineering
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course includes concepts and principles of sustainable engineering for infrastructure design and their application to analyze the impact of engineering design on resources consumption and the environment. This course is to introduce the concepts and principles of sustainable engineering for sustainable development, to discuss the challenges faced by today's infrastructures (e.g. buildings, roads, waste management facilities), to evaluate the impact of engineering design on resources consumption and the environment. Example topics include developing criteria of sustainable engineering, design for sustainable infrastructures and analysis of environmental impacts, extending the life and capacity of infrastructures through innovative technologies and creative management, industrial ecology, life-cycle assessment and other relevant topics.

Prof Name: Serdar Celik, Ph.D., Assistant Professor Department of Mechanical Engineering *
Course No. ME 417
Course Title: Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC)
Description of sustainability aspects:
Course deals with sustainable energy issues concerning: air-conditioning systems, psychrometrics, indoor air quality, heating and cooling loads, pumps and fans, duct design, and refrigeration.

Interdisciplinary Studies

Prof Name: Jennifer Rehg, Assistant Professor Department of Anthropology & Richard Bush, Associate Professor Policy Analysis & Public Administration (Spring 2009) Professors vary for this course. *
Course No. IS 336
Course Title: Global Problems and Human Survival
Description of sustainability aspects:
The course focuses on the identification and critical analysis of the causes of a number of global problems, such as those related to issues of human populations, violent conflicts, disease, energy and natural resources, and the environment, as well as approaches to addressing these problems.

Prof Name: Richard Brugam, Professor Biological Science & Julie Zimmermann Holt, Chair & Associate Professor Department of Anthropology *
Course No. IS 363
Course Title: Living Ecologically
Description of sustainability aspects:
This course looks at environmental sustainability from both biological and cultural perspectives. It considers human adaptations, past and present, from a cross-cultural perspective.
The course emphasizes these questions pertaining to sustainability:
1. Is it possible to continue our current life-style without damaging the earth's ecological support systems?
2. What is our current "ecological footprint" both as a nation and as an individual?
3. Is economic growth compatible with sustainability?
4. How might the negative impacts of economic activity on sustainability be mitigated?
5. What role do environmental regulations and pollution control have in sustainability?
6. What about recycling? Does it help?
7. What is the future of energy production and how does it impact earth systems (including air pollution and climate change)?
8. What is the role of human population in sustainability?
9. Is globalization good? What is its impact on the environment?
10. How does human food production impact the earth's environment?
a. Is organic agriculture a solution?
b. What about the Green Revolution?
c. What is the impact of Genetically Modified Organisms?

Prof Name: Jennifer Rehg, Assistant Professor Department of Anthropology *
Course No. IS 399
Course Title: Study Abroad Costa Rica
Description of sustainability aspects:
IS 399 is variable content. The Costa Rica version is a travel study course. Topics related to sustainability issues that are addressed include: socioeconomics of developing societies, deforestation and habitat alteration, and ecotourism.