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June 2014


SIUE 2014 Vaughnie Lindsay New Investigator Award to Melissa Chan

30 June 2014, 5:01 pm

Melissa ChanSouthern Illinois University Edwardsville’s Dr. Pui-Ling “Melissa” Chan, assistant professor of environmental sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences, is the recipient of the SIUE 2014 Vaughnie Lindsay New Investigator Award. The SIUE Graduate School presents the award to tenure-track faculty members whose scholarly activities have the promise of making significant contributions to their fields of study and to the University in general.

Chan’s current research focuses on understanding how the blood brain barrier, or BBB, can impact the neurological absorption of potentially harmful consumer products, such as pesticides or pharmaceuticals. The goal of her research is to fundamentally advance the field of extrapolation from in vitro [in test tubes] to in vivo [in the body] and to test how the BBB might absorb harmful environmental toxins. She anticipates that the preliminary results of this research will be used to improve laboratory methods used in producing these materials, and to develop useful tools and biomarkers for public health risk assessment.

As part of the award, Chan received a research grant from the University to pursue her research agenda. “Supporting young investigators who have the potential for making significant advancements in their area is important to the development of their research careers,” said Jerry Weinberg, associate provost for research and dean of the Graduate School. “It is even more important to the development of ground breaking discoveries that can make on society.”

Originally from Malaysia, Chan joined SIUE in the fall of 2011 after earning a PhD from the Kyoto University in Kyoto, Japan. She spent an additional two years in Kyoto pursuing post-doctoral work on risk assessment and developing mathematical models and numerical simulation methods, specifically physiologically based pharmacokinetic and fugacity models for various types of pollutants.

She also laid the groundwork in developing in vitro blood-brain barrier model and other toxicity bioassays in her lab. She continued to work as a visiting fellow for three more years at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) in North Carolina. She expanded her research to environmental systems biology, which includes developing models to evaluate the relationship of various environmental health outcomes and environmental variables using statistics and numerical simulation methods.

Chan then made a change in the direction of her research by moving to the National Toxicology Program at NIEHS, where she remained for another year and expanded her research to include tools and models used for qualitative and quantitative extrapolation of in vitro to in vivo data for pollutants.

During her career, Chan has published 11 peer-reviewed articles, as well as contributing to a book, Endocrine-disrupting chemicals: An overview. She has also served on several service organizations, and is the current chair of the Environmental Science Division at the Illinois State Academy of Science.

Dr. Steve Hansen, dean emeritus at SIUE, established the Lindsay Research Professorship Endowment that funds the Vaughnie Lindsay New Investigator Award. The award honors Dr. Vaughnie Lindsay, who served as graduate dean at SIUE from 1973 until 1986 and was responsible for creating much of the infrastructure that supports faculty research and scholarly activity. SIUE faculty and emeriti faculty donated the funds to endow the award.

If you would like to help support new investigators through the Vaughnie Lindsay New Investigator Award, donations to the endowment can be made by contacting the SIUE Foundation at 618-650-2345 or siue.edu/give.

Photo: Dr. Pui-Ling “Melissa” Chan, assistant professor of environmental sciences in the SIUE College of Arts and Sciences.




SIU SDM’s Hawkins Receives Colgate Research Award

30 June 2014, 7:00 am

Hawkins_AlexSouthern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine fourth-year student Alexandria Hawkins was selected by the American Association of Women Dentists (AAWD) to receive the 2014 Colgate Research Award for showing academic distinction and demonstrating excellence in research.

Hawkins is one of only 10 students nationally to receive the $500 award. The winners will be listed in the August issue of the AAWD’s Chronicle newsletter.

Hawkins’ research “Comparative Disinfection of Enterococcus faecalis Loaded Root Canals,” concentrated on research specific to endodontic irrigants.

“The research involves comparing different root canal irrigants based on how well they cleaned the canal and killed the bacteria,” Hawkins said. “My background as a biology major at SIUE and my previous research, which involved microbiology, initiated my interest in the topic, as well as the importance of successful root canal treatments in the field of dentistry.”

Earlier this spring, Hawkins won third place in the Dentsply Caulk research competition at the 43rd annual meeting and exposition of the American Association for Dental Research.

Dr. Mary Stillwell-Kuesel founded the Women’s Dental Association of the U.S.in Philadelphia, and for more than 89 years, AAWD has supported women dentists. Its goal was for women interested in dentistry to organize a society by which they could strengthen themselves by helping each other.

Photo: SIU SDM fourth-year student Alexandria Hawkins.




SIUE STEM Center Pitches in with Edwardsville District 7 Summer Zone Program

29 June 2014, 1:37 pm

SIUE’s STEM Center is assisting with the Edwardsville District 7 Summer Zone program through June into July. Edwardsville Intelligencer writer Julia Biggs described the STEM Center’s role during the eight-week Zone program in an article posted June 27. Each week, SIUE representatives lead activities that touch on various STEM fields.  Read the story.




SIUE Student’s Art Featured at Edwardsville Arts Center

27 June 2014, 1:34 pm

SIUE senior art student Jessica Belangee is featured in the Edwardsville Arts Center through July 11. Edwardsville Intelligencer writer Julia Biggs wrote about Belangee in a story posted June 14.




IERC at SIUE Receives Combined $550K from McCormick Foundation and Wallace Foundation

27 June 2014, 11:45 am

Janet Holt ERC environmental head shots and group shot 9-27-12The Illinois Education Research Council (IERC) at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville has been awarded a two-year, $500,000 grant from the Robert R. McCormick Foundation and a two-year $50,000 grant from the Wallace Foundation.

The McCormick Foundation grant will allow the IERC to examine the initial implementation of Illinois’ new policy for redesigning principal preparation programs from the university and pre-K through 12th grade perspectives.

“We are excited to work with the McCormick and Wallace Foundations, and statewide stakeholders to undertake this research study, which will inform the next stages of the continuous improvement process for Illinois’ principal preparation programs,” said Janet Holt, IERC executive director.

Holt, Brenda Klostermann, IERC associate director and assistant research professor, and Brad White, IERC senior researcher, will collaborate with the University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research on these projects.

This evaluation study is the next stage in the refinement of Illinois’ redesigned principal preparation programs. The original statewide redesign of the preparation programs was spearheaded by the Center of the Study of Education Policy at Illinois State University.

The IERC is an independent research organization at SIUE that conducts education policy research on issues of import to the state of Illinois. Since 2009, the IERC has been the legislated research arm of the Illinois P-20 Council. IERC policy research follows important educational trends in Illinois and is disseminated through research reports, presentations to the Illinois P-20 Council and its subcommittees, and through conference presentations.

The Robert R. McCormick Foundation – Investing in early education since 1993 – is committed to fostering communities of educated, informed and engaged citizens. Through philanthropic programs, Cantigny Park and museums, the Foundation helps develop citizen leaders and works to make life better in communities. The Foundation was established as a charitable trust in 1955, upon the death of Colonel Robert R. McCormick, the longtime editor and publisher of the Chicago Tribune. The Foundation is one of the nation’s largest, with more than $1 billion in assets.

The Wallace Foundation is a national philanthropy that seeks to improve education and enrichment for disadvantaged children. The foundation funds projects to test innovative ideas for solving important social problems, conducts research to find out what works, what doesn’t and to fill key knowledge gaps, and then communicates the results to help others.

Photo:  Janet Holt, IERC executive director.




SIUE’s Furst-Bowe Agrees to Educational Collaboration with China’s Minzu U.

25 June 2014, 4:34 pm

Furst-Bowe_SongMinSouthern Illinois University Edwardsville Chancellor Julie Furst-Bowe traveled to Beijing, China during the week of June 16 with a goal of establishing educational collaborations with Minzu University of China (MUC) and the Communication University of China (CUC).

Furst-Bowe met with officials at both universities including the MUC Vice President Dr. Song Min and the directors of international relations, graduate schools and faculty representatives. She is familiar with MUC as her previous institution, the University of Wisconsin-Stout, had several agreements with MUC where Minzu students would complete their bachelor’s degrees at UW-Stout.

“Both universities are interested in collaborating with SIUE in the areas of faculty and student exchanges, dual degree programs and hosting performance groups,” Furst-Bowe said. SIUE has signed a collaboration agreement with MUC and plans to sign an agreement with CUC after SIUE faculty have had an opportunity to review curriculum during the Fall 2014 semester.

“As two of our institutional focal points are to not only increase international student recruitment, but also to encourage study abroad by SIUE students, it is important for SIUE to aggressively pursue these academic collaborations,” Furst-Bowe added.

MUC is the top university in China specifically for ethnic minorities and aims to be one of the best universities of its kind in the world. With the strong support of the Chinese government, it has developed rapidly over the years. It is currently one of the most prestigious universities in China in the fields of ethnology, anthropology, ethnic economies, regional economics, religion studies, history, dance and fine arts. It is commonly regarded as one of the most respected institutes for higher learning in China.

Since its establishment in 1954, CUC has trained numerous high-level professionals for the Chinese media industry, and made a significant contribution to the nation’s media business and economy. It has been honored as the “cradle of the nation’s broadcasting and television talents.” CUC provides undergraduate, master and doctoral degree courses for full-time students, and diploma training courses for media professionals.

As one of the top public universities in China, CUC is ranked No.1 in media education and No.1 among China’s language universities. According to the 2012 China Discipline Ranking approved by the Chinese Ministry of Education, CUC is ranked first in both “Journalism and Communication” and “Drama Film and Television.”

Photo: SIUE Chancellor Julie Furst-Bowe (left) with Dr. Song Min, vice president  of Minzu University of China.




SIUE Alum Hightower Honored on U.S. House Floor

25 June 2014, 10:36 am

The St. Louis Suburban Journals reports that U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis (R-Ill.) honored SIUE alum Dr. Ed Hightower on the floor of the U.S. House to congratulate the Edwardsville School District 7 superintendent on his upcoming retirement. Hightower is also a former member of the SIU Board of Trustees. Read the story.




Little Shop of Horrors Opens Today at SIUE

25 June 2014, 10:36 am

Kernan and Michael

Little Shop of Horrors, one of the longest-running Off-Broadway shows of all time, will open Wednesday at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.

The hilarious musical comedy will come to the SIUE Dunham Hall stage at 7:30 p.m. from Thursday through Saturday. Two matinee shows have been set for 2 p.m. Saturday, June 28, and Sunday, June 29.

The spoof of 1950s sci-fi movies has become a household name, thanks mostly to a highly successful film version and a score by the songwriting team of Howard Ashman and Alan Menken.

A down-and-out skid row floral assistant becomes an overnight sensation when he discovers an exotic plant with a mysterious craving for fresh blood. Soon “Audrey II” grows into an ill-tempered, foul-mouthed, Rhythm and Blues-singing carnivore who offers him fame and fortune in exchange for feeding its growing appetite, finally revealing itself to be an alien creature poised for global domination.

Chris and Caitlin2

Little Shop of Horrors is directed by Wendy Renee Greenwood with musical direction by Dr. Kris Pineda, set design by Roger Speidel, costume design by Laura Pearson, lighting design by Valerie Goldston, sound design by Melissa Short, and property design by Kate Slovinski, with vocal direction Robert Valentine and Michael Nickerson as stage manager.

Tickets are $15 for adults (18 and older), $12 for seniors (65 and up), $12 for students (with a valid school I.D.) and children. Admission is free for SIUE students with a valid I.D. Discounted tickets are available for groups of 10 or more. All seats are general admission.

For ticket information, call the SIUE Fine Arts box office at (618) 650-2774 or toll free at (888) 328-5168, extension 2774. For more information, visit SIUE Arts and Sciences summer arts or email theater-tickets@siue.edu.

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville provides students with a high quality, affordable education that prepares them for successful careers and lives of purpose. Built on the foundation of a broad-based liberal education, and enhanced by hands-on research and real-world experiences, the academic preparation SIUE students receive equips them to thrive in the global marketplace and make our communities better places to live. Situated on 2,660 acres of beautiful woodland atop the bluffs overlooking the natural beauty of the Mississippi River’s rich bottomland and only a short drive from downtown St. Louis, the SIUE campus is home to a diverse student body of nearly 14,000.

Photos:

Seymour (played by Chris Kernan) poses with Audrey II for a photo taken by Mushnik (played by Michael Nickerson).

Audrey (played by Caitlin Mickey) sings with Seymour (played by Chris Kernan).

 




Bernaix named SIUE School of Nursing Interim Dean

25 June 2014, 9:41 am

Dr. Laura Bernaix School of Nursing SON interim Dean 06-09-14The Southern Illinois University Board of Trustees has confirmed Dr. Laura Bernaix as interim dean of the SIUE School of Nursing effective July 1. The Board met in a special session Tuesday, June 24, at B. Barnard Birger Hall on the SIUE campus.

Bernaix, a professor and associate dean of academic programs in the School of Nursing, replaces Dr. Anne G. Perry who will retire at the end of June after 10 years at SIUE.

Bernaix brings 25 years of academic experience as an SIUE faculty member. During those years, she has provided significant service to the School and to the University in a variety of roles. She has served as chair of the Department of Primary Care and Health Systems Nursing since 2009. In 2013, her role expanded to also serve as associate dean.

Among her many service activities within the School, Bernaix has served on the Research and Grant Review Committee, the Graduate Curriculum Committee, the P&T (promotion and tenure) Committee, the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) Task Force, and several key search committees. She has chaired the Dean’s Advisory Committee, the Doctor of Nursing Practice Project Committee and the School of Nursing Faculty Council.

At the University level, Bernaix served on the Faculty Senate from 2002-05 and on the Graduate Course Review Committee from 2003-10. She has been a counselor in the Peer Consulting/Mentoring Program since 2010, participated on the REALITY Experiential Learning Work Group and is a member of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) BRAD (Biomedical/Biobehavioral Research Administration Development) Steering Committee.

“Dr. Bernaix’s experience and leadership at SIUE has been characterized by a positive approach to problem solving, and a clear commitment to academic and scholarly excellence,” said Dr. Ann Boyle, interim provost and vice chancellor of Academic Affairs. “Her leadership capabilities and experience will be important for the School of Nursing during this interim period as the responsibilities are numerous. I am pleased that Dr. Bernaix is willing to serve the School in this interim role.”

Bernaix is acknowledged professionally for her extensive service to the national Association of Women’s Health, Obstetrics and Neonatal Nursing (AWHONN) Research Advisory Panel. She was a co-principal investigator for the NIH National Children’s Study from 2009-13 and has presented her work at international and national conferences.

Bernaix has published in various professional journals, and is a reviewer for two maternal-newborn nursing journals and one textbook publisher. She is a Fellow in the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Leadership for Academic Nursing Program and has served on the editorial board of the Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic and Neonatal Nursing since 2009. In February 2014, she served as a reviewer for the 2014 NIH NRCS Study Section.

“It is an honor and a privilege to serve in this role for the School of Nursing,” said Bernaix. “I look forward to my ongoing partnership with our exceptional faculty, staff and students, as well as our supportive community colleagues and agencies.”

Bernaix will immediately begin transition planning. A search for a permanent dean will begin in Fall 2015.

The SIUE School of Nursing’s fully accredited programs are committed to creating excellence in nursing leadership through innovative teaching, evidence-based practice, quality research, patient advocacy and community service. Enrolling nearly 1,000 students in its baccalaureate, master’s and doctoral programs, the School develops leaders in pursuit of shaping the nursing profession and impacting the health care environment. Through expanded programs located on the SIU Carbondale campus and SIU School of Medicine campus, the SIUE School of Nursing is helping to solve the region’s shortage of baccalaureate-prepared nurses and enhance the quality of nursing practice within hospitals and medical centers.

-SIUE-

Photo: Dr. Laura Bernaix, interim dean of the SIUE School of Nursing.




SIUE School of Education Name Change Better Reflects Breadth of Academic Programs

24 June 2014, 2:59 pm

Curt Lox Interim Dean of School of Education 05-29-14Southern Illinois University Edwardsville announced today that it is officially changing the name of its School of Education to the School of Education, Health and Human Behavior. The name change is effective Tuesday, July 1.

The new name more accurately reflects the breadth of the School’s academic program offerings. The School offers undergraduate and graduate degrees, as well as licensure programs in:

  • College student personnel administration
  • Curriculum and instruction
  • Early childhood education
  • Elementary education
  • Educational administration
  • Instructional technology
  • Kinesiology and health education
  • Learning, culture and society
  • Psychology
  • Secondary education
  • Special education and communication disorders

“We take great pride in the fact that we prepare hundreds of highly qualified Pre-K through 12 classroom teachers and administrators,” said SIUE Chancellor Julie Furst-Bowe. “But, it is also important for our prospective students, opinion leaders and community members to know that we also prepare professionals in several other high-demand areas.”

“This change is a long overdue acknowledgement of several popular and fast-growing programs in our school such as psychology, speech-language pathology, exercise science and community health,” said Interim Dean Curt Lox.

In Fall 2013, there were nearly 2,000 enrolled in the School, and 74 percent of the School’s undergraduate student body were majoring in health- and human behavioral-related areas.

Photo: SIUE’s Curt Lox, interim dean of the School of Education, Health and Human Behavior.




Boy Scouts of America Names SIUE Alum Rick Bragga National Alumnus of the Year

24 June 2014, 8:00 am

The Scouting Alumni Association of the Boy Scouts of America selected SIUE alum Rick Bragga, of Richmond, Va., as the 2014 National Alumnus of Bragga-Rick-Awardthe Year Award recipient. Bragga earned both bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mass communications from SIUE in 1977 and ’82, respectively.

Ed Pease, national alumni committee chair, presented the award May 23 at the National Eagle Scout Association’s Americanism breakfast, which took place during the BSA’s National Annual Meeting in Nashville, Tenn.

The prestigious award is given to an adult alumnus who exemplifies the Scout Oath and Scout Law and who has significantly contributed through community service, achieved distinction in his or her career or avocation, and contributed significantly to the advancement of scouting through alumni activities.

“The Alumnus of the Year Award is an affirmation of the positive impact that Scouting has had on generations of Americans and the communities where they live, by acknowledging the extraordinary contributions made by alumni whose lives it has shaped,” said Pease. “This year’s honoree, Rick Bragga, is such a man, still making the world a better place decades after becoming an Eagle Scout.”

Bragga is a Distinguished Eagle Scout and a member of the executive board of the Heart of Virginia Council, and has been a national-level Scouting volunteer for more than a decade. He has served on the national Cub Scout Committee, was the chairman of the Development and Corporate Alliance Committee, is a vice president of the National Eagle Scout Association, and is the chairman of the National Scouting Museum Committee.

Bragga was cited as “being deeply involved in the creation of the BSA’s alumni program since its birth four years ago. He is the author of the alumni program syllabus used at the Philmont Training Center, presented training across the country, and is the brains behind and writer of many of the Scouting Alumni Association materials.”

“Receiving this award is a great honor, and I am grateful. I hope it draws attention to one of the most critical issues facing the Boy Scouts—re-engaging our 50–100 million alumni,” said Bragga. “Second only to youth membership, alumni is the most important priority to ensure our successful future. With more members, volunteers, money, and marketing, we can serve the youth of today at higher levels and in more numbers than we ever have.”

Currently, Bragga is a senior consultant at Corporate DevelopMint, a strategic planning and fundraising consulting firm, and the president of Philanthropy1. He has written numerous fundraising articles including “Funding the Function: What Do You Do to Pay the Price of Generating Contributions?” and “The Up-side of a Down Economy,” served on the Certified Fund Raising Executives International and the Association for Healthcare Philanthropy International boards, and has helped various charities raise more than $170 million. In 2012, the Association of Healthcare Philanthropy presented Bragga with the AHP Award of Excellence for exemplary service and extraordinary leadership in the field of health care development.

Photo:  Rick Bragga (left) accepts the Boy Scouts of America 2014 National Alumnus of the Year Award from Ed Pease, national alumni committee chair.




It’s Coming up Radishes, Tomatoes and More at SIUE’s Student Garden

23 June 2014, 4:55 pm

Jessica and tomatoes

A Southern Illinois University Edwardsville student acknowledges that it may be easier to grab a bag of chips as a snack than to wait for broccoli to grow in a garden.

“But putting in the work is so worth it,” said Melissa Hillman, a senior majoring in biology sciences: ecology, evolution and environment. “And fresh vegetables are so much better for you.”

Hillman is one of several people in the student sustainability group, Natural Connections, who helped start a garden on land and with tools and materials provided by The Gardens at SIUE.

“Natural Connections wants to help reconnect people with their food,” said Wolf-Mark Veverka, president. The student group started the garden in April and now have vegetables and herbs planted in six of the nine beds they built.

“It’s all done by students and is for the sake of benefiting students and their families,” said Veverka, a senior also majoring in biological sciences: ecology, evolution and environment. “And we couldn’t have done any of it without the help of Don Mueller and The Gardens at SIUE.”

Jessica and Wolf, garden beds

After weeks of work, some “fruit” of all the students’ labor is starting to bud.

“We’re harvesting some radishes and peas today,” said Jessica Urbonas, vice president for Natural Connections who was raised on farm. Urbonas is also studying biological sciences with the emphasis on ecology, evolution and environment. Urbonas grew up learning about and loving to garden.

Hillman, however, did not like to get her hands dirty when she was younger, though she liked eating fresh foods. Things have changed. She enjoys gardening and sharing the experience with her seven-year-old son Thomas. The single mother is also grateful to have a place to garden.

“Gardening builds an appreciation for food. These skills will benefit him all his life,” Hillman said. “I’ve always fed my son vegetables and fresh food. He loves to munch on tomatoes as a snack and enjoys fresh broccoli and spinach.

Jackie Norfolk and radishes

“My son spent a lot of time with me out here in the garden pulling out the weeds,” Hillman said. “When he gets to eat the tomatoes, he will be so grateful he did the work.”

Some other vegetables and herbs currently planted in the garden include: bell peppers, yellow squash, snap peas, kale, cabbage, basil, dill and chive.

Students can help in the garden during the summer hours that Natural Connection members are working: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Wednesdays. Those students who help cultivate and work the garden are free to partake of the food, said Veverka.

For more information, contact natconnectsiue@gmail.com. Additional information can be found at The Gardens at SIUE.

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville provides students with a high quality, affordable education that prepares them for successful careers and lives of purpose. Built on the foundation of a broad-based liberal education, and enhanced by hands-on research and real-world experiences, the academic preparation SIUE students receive equips them to thrive in the global marketplace and make our communities better places to live. Situated on 2,660 acres of beautiful woodland atop the bluffs overlooking the natural beauty of the Mississippi River’s rich bottomland and only a short drive from downtown St. Louis, the SIUE campus is home to a diverse student body of nearly 14,000.

Photos:

Jessica Urbonas, vice president for Natural Connections, tends to a one of the tomato plants.

Wolf-Mark Veverka, president of Natural Connections, and Jessica Urbonas work to put a fence on one of the garden beds.

Jackie Norfolk, external affairs chairman for Natural Connections, pulls up a radish from the Students’ Garden.

 




SIUE Alum Herndon is IAHPERD Middle School Teacher of the Year

23 June 2014, 11:40 am

Herndon_mattSIUE alum Matt Herndon is the Illinois Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (IAHPERD) Middle School Teacher of the Year. Herndon has taught physical education to 6th-8th graders at Lewis & Clark Junior High School in Wood River for the past 16 years.

Herndon will be honored at IAHPERD’s state awards reception Thursday, Nov. 20, at Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles, Ill., during the group’s annual convention.

As the state award winner, Herndon is eligible to apply for the Midwest SHAPE (Society of Health and Physical Educators) Award Teacher of the Year and the Midwest District Teacher of the Year.

In the acknowledgement letter from awards chair Ann Hanson, Herndon was lauded for “providing students with flexible, adaptable and dynamic classroom experiences. You are an example of excellence.”

An East Alton native, Herndon achieved both bachelor’s and master’s degrees from SIUE.  His bachelor’s in physical education was in 1996, and he followed in 2007 with a master’s in kinesiology with an emphasis in sport management.

“I want to thank SIUE for the great education I got from my former teachers like George Luedke, Nelda Covington, John Baker, Larry Moehn, Larry Kristoff, Myrna Schild and Tasso Kaburakis,” Herndon said. “I got a quality education from some great teachers at SIUE.  They pushed me and developed me in to what I am today as a teacher.”

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville provides students with a high quality, affordable education that prepares them for successful careers and lives of purpose. Built on the foundation of a broad-based liberal education, and enhanced by hands-on research and real-world experiences, the academic preparation SIUE students receive equips them to thrive in the global marketplace and make our communities better places to live. Situated on 2,660 acres of beautiful woodland atop the bluffs overlooking the natural beauty of the Mississippi River’s rich bottomland and only a short drive from downtown St. Louis, the SIUE campus is home to a diverse student body of nearly 14,000.

-SIUE-

Photo:  Lewis & Clark Junior High School Teacher Matt Herndon.




SIUE’s Rowbotham Demonstrates Faculty Development Gets Results

23 June 2014, 10:47 am

Robotham_Melodie_mugSouthern Illinois University Edwardsville’s Dr. Melodie Rowbotham presented her research “The Impact of Faculty Development on Teaching Self-Efficacy, Teaching Skills and Retention” during The Teaching Professor Conference in Boston May 31.

Rowbotham is an associate professor in the SIUE School of Nursing and is coordinator of Faculty Development. She is an Illinois Education Research Council (IERC) Faculty Research Fellow and her research is partially funded by the IERC.

The 75-minute session was attended by more than 100 faculty from across disciplines. The research looked at how faculty development programs influence teacher self-efficacy and self-evaluation of teaching skills.

Research participants were full-time SIUE faculty. They attended a two-day workshop during Summer 2013 and met five times during the ensuing academic year. They completed surveys at both the beginning and the end. The control group was also full-time SIUE faculty, but they only completed the surveys.

“We learned that faculty development does positively impact our teaching,” Rowbotham said. “Although we are busy with all of our responsibilities, taking time for faculty development is important.”

The experimental group discovered that as teachers they:

  • Developed more active learning activities
  • Were more engaging with students
  • Were more open to dialogue and questions
  • Created a more positive learning environment
  • Were more aware of the various types of learners in classes
  • Were not afraid to try something new

Rowbotham thought her presentation was received positively. “The presentation also included details about a faculty development program, and many faculty who attended the workshop asked for more details after the presentation,” she said. “I was able to network and possibly develop research partners with other universities. I was also invited to Saudia Arabia to help a new all-women university with its faculty development.”

A certified nurse educator, Rowbotham earned a bachelor’s in nursing from Brigham Young University in 1988. She achieved both her master’s in nursing and doctorate in adult education from the University of Missouri-St. Louis in 1999 and 2007, respectively. Following a nine-year teaching stint at UMSL, the O’Fallon, Mo., resident has been a member of the SIUE faculty for the past six years.

Each year, The Teaching Professor Conference features sessions around these seven topical areas:

  • Instructional Design
  • Activities that Engage Students
  • Teaching Specific Types of Students
  • Instructional Vitality: Ways to Keep Teaching Fresh and Invigorated
  • Teaching and Learning with Technology
  • Creating Climates for Learning
  • Faculty Development

The three-day conference is designed with learning opportunities to enrich the teaching practice. There are preconference workshops that provide hands-on learning, plenary sessions keynoted by nationally recognized experts, selected concurrent sessions on a range of relevant topics and poster presentations highlighting the latest research.

Photo: Melodie Rowbotham, associate professor in the SIUE School of Nursing.  




SIUE Engineering Summer Camp Concludes with Record Participation

20 June 2014, 1:25 pm

Conton_Carrie_EngCampvHigh school students from across the region and as far away as California concluded the second of two sessions Friday, June 20, at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville’s 2014 Engineering Summer Camp. The SIUE School of Engineering’s popular residential camp brought 71 high school students to campus during two week-long sessions. Approximately 35 students participated in each of the programs.

The Engineering Summer Camp’s June 7-13 and June 16-20 sessions both included a week of exploration in the various engineering disciplines offered at SIUE, as well as computer science and construction management. Summer camp participants engaged in hands-on laboratory experiences, design contests, field trips and learned from guest speakers about opportunities in engineering.

As part of the residential experience, students lived with a roommate in University residence halls, dined in the Morris University Center and engaged in campus activities such as bowling, swimming, rock wall climbing, volleyball, basketball and playing arcade games.

“Our summer campers bring incredible creativity and enthusiasm to our hands-on engineering challenges,” said Chris Gordon, associate dean for the School of Engineering. “It’s highly rewarding for our instructors to work with such talented future engineers as they see engineering in action and discover the tremendous opportunities ahead of them.”

The camp draws regional and national attendance. In the past three years, the camp has attracted applications from 10 states beyond Illinois. In addition to neighboring states, the camps have also attracted applications from as far as California, Oklahoma, Nevada, Alaska, Florida and Idaho.

The camp also helps to attract highly prepared students to the School of Engineering. This fall, six former camp participants will begin their studies in the School of Engineering, including two who are Provost Scholars. These students have an average ACT composite score of 29.8 and average high school GPA of 3.83.

For more information about the program, visit siue.edu/engineering.

Photo: Carrie Conton prepares to launch her rocket at SIUE’s 2014 Engineering Summer Camp.




Former SIUE East St. Louis Center Student is Planning to Take an Enormous Bite out of the Consumer Electronics Market

20 June 2014, 9:22 am

Rice2

In 10 years, a former Southern Illinois University Edwardsville East St. Louis Center student plans to have his company’s name in one other country besides the U.S.

“Eventually, I see my company (2Dots Electronics) being like another Apple Inc.,” said Brandon Rice of East St. Louis. Rice was a four-year participant of the Upward Bound BEM Program at the SIUE East St. Louis Center. He also graduated from the SIUE East St. Louis Charter High School (CHS) in 2013, ranking fourth in his class.

“We are a consumer electronics company. I want to be on the forefront of innovation and technology,” said Brandon, who recently completed his freshman year at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign. The electrical engineering major started the electronics company with five other U of I students.

“I don’t see much new innovation in computer technology today,” Rice said. “Nothing has really changed with the IPhone or the Mac. But their background companies are the ones doing the innovating work, like Qualcomm.

Qualcomm has now skyrocketed in the area of consumer electronics, according to Brandon, which is what he wants for his start-up company.

Currently, Rice’s company is working on a new system for laser tag.

“The 2Dots laser tag system is a completely mobile and immersive experience for people of all ages,” explained the young entrepreneur. “The main goal is to provide a different outlet to play laser tag. It is an innovative game with ultra sound, infrared and smart phone technology.

“This system takes all the fun of laser tag and puts in on Facebook. Its attributes include being small, mobile and fashionable. We are ready for the future, and we feel the future is ready for us.”

Rice has been working in electronics since he was nine years old. “I was taking apart my brother’s radio control cars when he was younger,” he said. “My grandfather was a carpenter and did a lot of electrical work, and I learned a lot of things from him.”

At age 13, Rice said things fell into place for him when he observed people creating electric scooters and smart houses.

Rice attended CHS from 2009-2013 and was on the school’s robotics team the entire time. For three of those years, he was the captain of design for the CHS Robotics Team.

The CHS Robotics Team won several awards during Rice’s time, including finishing among four finalists in the double elimination round of an international Botball competition of 63 teams. The competition was held in July 2011 in Orange County, Calif., featuring teams from around the globe including Poland, Austria and Qatar.

At that competition, the CHS team also received a Judges’ Choice Certificate: The Mars Rover Viking Award for “achievement against great odds,” because the school did not have a practice table at the time as the majority of competing teams did. Rice was also among robotic team members who placed third out of 17 teams in the 2011 Greater St. Louis Botball Regional Tournament held at SIUE.

Rice also joined Upward Bound as a sophomore and remained in the program through his senior year in high school.

“I joined because I wanted the program to help me with college readiness, tutoring and writing,” Rice said. “Upward Bound also referred me to SIUE’s summer engineering program. I really liked it.

“We got to stay in dorms and see how college life would be. They taught us about civil engineering, computer engineering, electrical engineering and chemical engineering. That is when I found out I wanted to go into electrical engineering. Scientists can use complex circuits and can program something that works well.”

Rice attended SIUE School of Engineering Summer Camp in 2011 and 2012.

Rice was a student who always pushed himself and worked hard, said Edward Schuessler, his former Upward Bound counselor.

“Brandon always seemed to be up for an academic challenge. I have no doubt in my mind that Brandon will be a success in life,” said Schuessler.

Rice finished up his freshman year with a 3.5 GPA and is eager to start his sophomore year at U of I. He is currently taking summer courses at Southwestern Illinois College in Belleville.

“I’m taking English 101, because it’s a subject that I’m weak in,” Rice said. “A good engineer will take into consideration the entire project, and that’s what I’m trying to do with my education and career goals.”

 SIUE East St. Louis Center Upward Bound BEM 

• The Upward Bound (BEM) Program is committed to developing a year-round education program, which will excite, motivate and prepare a selected 65 high school students from the program’s target areas. The quality services provided will prepare the students for successful high school completion and entrance into post-secondary programs.

• Upward Bound (BEM) is a college-preparatory program designed to serve low-income and/or potential first-generation college students who are currently in grades 9-12.

• The program serves students who attend, or plan to attend, Brooklyn High School, SIUE East St. Louis Charter High School and Madison High School.

• Those eligible to apply are students from Illinois School Districts 188 (Brooklyn), 189 (SIUE East St. Louis Charter High School) and 12 (Madison) who, at the time of initial selection, are in grades 9-12 and between the ages of 13-19. Students must be from a low-income family and be the first in his/her family to pursue a college education. Students must also require academic support for pursuing education beyond high school.

 




SIUE to Participate in Forum on Internationalizing U.S. College Campuses

19 June 2014, 3:08 pm

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville’ Melissa Mace will participate in the fifth annual EducationUSA Forum in Washington D.C. from June 23-25.

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the EducationUSA Forum will bring together 550 university representatives with over 60 EducationUSA regional educational experts and advisors from around the world. They will discuss strategies for helping international students to study in the United States and promoting U.S. study abroad.

The EducationUSA Forum offers practical information and strategies to help internationalize U.S. campuses. Workshop sessions, presented by international education experts, U.S. higher education representatives, and government officials present unique and valuable information on recruiting international students while supporting diversity in international education.

“As two of our institutional focal points are to not only increase international student recruitment, but also to encourage study abroad by SIUE students, it is important for SIUE to participate in these types of events,” said Mace, assistant director of admissions for graduate and international recruitment. “We are always searching for more strategies to put SIUE’s exceptional academic offerings in front of prospective students. This conference will enhance our ability to achieve that goal.”

According to EducationUSA, universities such as SIUE play an important role in strengthening ties between the United States and countries around the world.  By internationalizing campuses, EducationUSA believes relationships are built between people and communities around the world that solve global challenges. Its theory is that an international education prepares students for a globalized 21st century workforce, and international students have a positive economic impact on the United States.

As the premiere study destination for international students, the education sector represents the fifth largest U.S. services export and added nearly $25 billion to the U.S. economy during academic year 2012-13.

EducationUSA is the U.S. Department of State-supported network of hundreds of advising centers around the world. Each year, EducationUSA advisors provide millions of international students with accurate, comprehensive and current information about how to apply to U.S. colleges and universities.

The Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs promotes mutual understanding between Americans and people from around the world through a wide range of academic, cultural, private sector, professional and sports exchange programs. These international exchanges engage youth, students, educators, artists, athletes and emerging leaders from the United States and nearly 170 countries. Alumni of these exchanges comprise over one million people around the world, including more than 50 Nobel Laureates and more than 350 current or former heads of state and government.




SIUE East St. Louis Center Announces its 2014 Summer Food Program

19 June 2014, 12:58 pm

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is participating in the Summer Food Service Program.

Meals will be provided to all SIUE East St. Louis Center Summer Program enrolled children free of charge. Acceptance and participation requirements for the program and all activities are the same for all regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability, and there will be no discrimination in the course of the meal service.

Any person who believes that he or she has been discriminated against in any USDA-related activity should write to: USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TTY).

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Meals will be provided at the site(s) listed below beginning June 23, 2014 and ending July 24, 2014. For further information contact DaWanda Gresham at (618) 482-6909.

(LISTING OF SITES)

SIUE East St. Louis Center

601 James R. Thompson Blvd.

East St. Louis, Il 62201




IDOT Adopts SIUE Online Training for Emergency Responders

19 June 2014, 11:10 am

FriesRyan_smThe Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), in partnership with the Illinois Center for Transportation and Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, is introducing the Traffic Incident Management Training Program.

“The online program is designed for emergency responders, including transportation workers, police, fire and towing and recovery crews,” said Ryan Fries, associate professor and graduate program director in the Department of Civil Engineering within SIUE’s School of Engineering.  “We have spent the past five years accumulating the research to make this program come to life and be highly effective.”

The online course is offered for all disciplines involved in incident management, and provides responders with information to improve their safety at incident scenes.

“The better trained emergency responders are when arriving to an incident scene, the better the outcome for everyone,” said Illinois Transportation Secretary Ann L. Schneider. “It is very important to us to provide an easy, convenient training option for emergency responders to help ensure safety for all traveling on Illinois roadways.”

The program includes the new online course and a multi-agency in-class session. The online training includes 11 modules, each lasting between 15 and 30 minutes, to allow responders to view a whole module in one sitting.

Each module is narrated by an expert in the field and includes a wide variety of perspectives. The in-class session runs a half-day, and is equivalent to the National Traffic Incident Management Training (TIM) offered by the Federal Highway Administration, but focuses on laws and responders in Illinois.

In addition to improving safety at incident sites, the trainings are expected to improve communication, coordination and cooperation between all emergency responders throughout the state.

To register online for the training, visit http://www.ildottraining.org/ and include “TIM” next to your first name. For more information about the TIM Training Program, contact Geno Koehler at (217) 782-7328.

Photo: Ryan Fries, associate professor and graduate program director in the SIUE Department of Civil Engineering.




SIUE Student-Athletes Complete 16 Straight Semesters with 3.0 GPA

19 June 2014, 10:56 am

SIUE student-athletes have reached another milestone – 16 consecutive semesters (eight years) with a cumulative grade point average (GPA) better than 3.0.

SIUE student-athletes completed the 2014 spring semester with a 3.095 grade point average. Among the 228 SIUE student-athletes, 66.7 percent completed the term with a GPA of 3.0 or above and 29 percent finished the spring semester as members of the Dean’s List with a GPA of 3.5 or above.

“I congratulate our student-athletes on their continued success in the classroom,” SIUE Director of Athletics Dr. Brad Hewitt said. “Our student-athletes are committed to academic excellence. We will continue to provide a structure in which all can fulfill their academic goals.”

The women’s golf team finished with the highest team GPA for the fourth-consecutive semester with a 3.79. They were followed by women’s cross country (3.533), women’s tennis (3.394), women’s soccer (3.353), volleyball (3.306), women’s track and field (3.277), men’s tennis (3.25), men’s golf (3.191), women’s basketball (3.152), men’s cross country (3.131) and softball (3.045).

Hewitt credited the Academic Support Staff and the strategies implemented since SIUE completed certification to NCAA Division I status.

“Our Academic Support Staff is invaluable,” Hewitt added. “The staff makes sure each student-athlete stays on track not only during the semester, but also as they progress toward their degree.

“We have an outstanding study space for our student-athletes in the Vadalabene Center which gives them the resources needed to aid in their education.”

Hewitt said success begins with recruiting student-athletes who share SIUE’s vision of academic success.

“It all begins with the recruiting process,” Hewitt continued. “Our coaches continue to recruit student-athletes who not only are committed to athletic success, but also academic success. The academic success of our student-athletes is a reflection of the resources the university provides, the outstanding faculty and support of University leadership.”




SIUE 2014 Healthcare Diversity Summer Camp Featured in BND

17 June 2014, 4:45 pm

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville’s 2014 Healthcare Diversity Summer Camp was featured in the Belleville News-Democrat last week. Writer Jamie Forsythe posted the following story

Thursday, June 12:

Hands-on health care camp highlights medical careers

With two pharmacists as parents, Edwardsville High School senior Philip Siganga, 17, says he’s destined for a career in health care. He’s interested in pharmaceutical, but wanted to learn about other medical fields.

“My dad said I should see some diversity and broaden my view,” Philip said.

This week he’s doing just that. Philip is participating in a health care diversity summer camp at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, where metro-east high school students learn about pharmacy, nursing and dental medicine as well as other health care careers.

“It’s a very good hands-on experience for people who want to pursue health care fields,” Phillip said.

He enjoyed learning earlier this week about the different fields of nursing as well as what an anesthesiologist does. Anesthesiology is another field he may consider.

“Anesthesiology is really tough,” Philip said. “I enjoyed learning about the different types of chemicals … and the complexity of it.”

He’s looking forward to Thursday when they will visit the School of Pharmacy at SIUE.

The 16 high school junior and seniors were at the SIU School of Dental Medicine in Alton Wednesday to learn about anatomy and physiology.

The students from metro-east high schools including Cahokia, Belleville West and O’Fallon rotated in groups of three between six different stations Wednesday morning.

OTHS junior Alyssa Dollison got a peek into her cheek at the first station her group visited. Alyssa, sporting plastic gloves, swabbed the side of her cheek using the wooden part of a large swab and then tapped it onto a glass slide, which she was able to look at under a microscope. SIU dental student Spencer Blackdram told the students they were looking at a DNA cell.

Alyssa said she’s liked all the hands-on activities during the camp, and getting to interact with SIUE students and faculty members.

Students also had the opportunity see the inside of a human body using a large, computerized table called an Anatomage, which displays three-dimensional images.

“This is a scan of an actual person,” said Kevin Rowland, director of research for the SIU School of Dental Medicine, as the students peered at the inside of a human body displayed on the tabletop.

Rowland asked Belleville West junior Noah Dintelmann, 17, to touch the scalpel on the screen and cut the body anywhere. Noah hesitated for a second before slicing the body in half, right below the lungs.

Noah was able to zoom out and rebuild the body as he did. “That’s cool,” he said.

Noah said he’s enjoyed learning about different medical fields, especially nursing, and meeting new people.

To be selected for the health care camp, the students had to have a 3.0 grade point average and a minimum of two years of high school math and science classes. Applicants also wrote an essay explaining their interest in health care.

The camp started in 2009 as a three-day camp exposing students to the School of Pharmacy, according to camp coordinator Lakesha Butler, a clinical associate professor at the School of Pharmacy. The camp was expanded to a full week last year and now includes SIUE’s three main health care schools — dental, nursing and pharmacy.

“Our overall goal is to increase the diversity of all three programs,” Butler said. “I want to open their eyes to areas they were not aware of.”

The goal of the camp is to not only expose students to health care fields but college life in general, as well as how to prepare for college, according to Butler. “We want them to understand what it takes to be a college student,” she said.

The five-day residency camp is free for participating students, as SIUE received a $5,000 grant from Walgreens, which covers the cost including meals and housing. The students stay on campus in Bluff Hall for four nights — Monday through Thursday.

Butler said the university is hoping to expand the camp in the future and have more high school students attend.

Contact reporter Jamie Forsythe at 239-2562 or jforsythe1@bnd.com. Follow her on Twitter at @BND_JForsythe.

 




SIUE Campus LGBT Approval Rating Continues to Rise

17 June 2014, 10:23 am

Safe ZoneWhen it comes to the overall institutional campus climate score for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) community, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville made the honor roll.

SIUE’s LGBT-Friendly Campus Climate Index rose to 4.5 out of 5 stars.

“SIUE continues to strive for excellence and to create a diverse and inclusive campus community and this is evident by our continuous improvement in ensuring an LGBT friendly campus,” said Dr. Venessa Brown, associate provost for Institutional Diversity and Inclusion. “While we have made progress, our goal is to continue to improve our multicultural programming and Safe Zone activities which allow us to live out our values of citizenship and inclusion. SIUE is a welcoming and respectful campus community for everyone.”

The University was ranked with more than 400 campuses across the country, using the LGBT-Friendly Campus Climate Index. The Index is a “national assessment tool for assisting campuses in improving the environment for people on campus who are LGBT and ultimately shapes the educational experience to be more inclusive, welcoming and respectful of LGBT and Ally people.”

SIUE submitted information to the national assessment tool in 2012. The University’s overall score was 3 out of 5 stars in 2012 and 4 out of 5 stars in 2013.

“Due to your overall rating of 4.5 stars, it is evident that your campus has already made a significant commitment to LGBT and Ally people on campus,” according to the written report. “It is recommended that you focus on the remaining areas of improvement highlighted by the assessment tool. Use this report as a way to honor your achievements and to further examine what you can do for positive LGBT change over the next year.”

SIUE received the following ratings in other LGBT areas for 2014:

• Policy inclusion, 4.5 stars

• Support and institutional commitment, 3 stars

• Academic life, 4.5 stars

• Student life, 5 stars

• Housing and residence life, 4.5 stars

• Campus safety, 5 stars

• Counseling and health, 5 stars

• Recruitment and retention efforts, 5 stars

The LGBT Friendly Campus Climate Index report gave SIUE several overall recommendations and encouragements. Some of the suggestions include:

• Further attention in LGBT training for faculty and fostering open LGBT dialogue in the academic setting

• Continue to improve housing options and inclusive policies for LGBT people (specifically for transgender student population)

Below is some praise from the Index report:

• Maintain ongoing examination of LGBT counseling and health concerns, particularly the emotional and physical concerns of students coming out and transgender populations

• Continue to develop outreach and retention programs that target LGBT and Ally communities

The Safe Zone Program provides resources to the university community. SIUE Safe Zone’s mission is “to develop a campus community of allies and provide support to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students, faculty, and staff with the ultimate goal of developing SIUE as a safe and welcoming place for LGBT people.”

For more information about SIUE’s LGBT community, visit Safe Zone.

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville provides students with a high quality, affordable education that prepares them for successful careers and lives of purpose. Built on the foundation of a broad-based liberal education, and enhanced by hands-on research and real-world experiences, the academic preparation SIUE students receive equips them to thrive in the global marketplace and make our communities better places to live. Situated on 2,660 acres of beautiful woodland atop the bluffs overlooking the natural beauty of the Mississippi River’s rich bottomland and only a short drive from downtown St. Louis, the SIUE campus is home to a diverse student body of nearly 14,000.

 




Martinez Joins SIUE as Director of Equal Opportunity, Access and Title IX Coordination

17 June 2014, 9:44 am

Martinez_ChadSouthern Illinois University Edwardsville Chancellor Julie Furst-Bowe has appointed Chad Martinez as director of the Office of Equal Opportunity, Access and Title IX Coordination. He assumes his new duties effective July 3.

Martinez arrives on the SIUE campus after serving as an equity officer in Saint Louis University’s Office of Institutional Equity and Diversity since 2010. He was the deputy Title IX coordinator and was on the Sexual Assault Working Group that adopted a new policy to address instances of sexual assault involving students. He served on the President’s Diversity Council and led that Council during 2012. He was also the federal government’s primary contact during an audit of the University’s affirmative action plan. He has investigated and mediated concerns of discrimination and harassment involving students, faculty and staff.

“Chad Martinez has a wealth of experience in both public and private higher education, as well as in the private business sector,” Furst-Bowe said. “He brings a strong background in ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) oversight, Title IX compliance, online program development, complaint resolution and affirmative action leadership to the position. The implementation of training for sexual assault reporting will be a priority in the coming year.”

“I want to thank Chancellor Furst-Bowe for this opportunity and appreciated working through the process with search chair Earleen Patterson and the committee,” said Martinez.

A native of Saginaw, Mich., Martinez has worked for several institutions during the last decade. Along with SLU, he has worked at Purdue University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in expanding roles committed to equal opportunity and access. He has developed and delivered programming, presentations and trainings to faculty, students and staff on the topics of discrimination, harassment, disability accommodation, affirmative action, diversity awareness, cultural competency, and sexual assault prevention and awareness.

While at the University of Illinois from 2006-2010, Martinez was an assistant director within the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access. He was responsible for ADA compliance and was co-chair of the chancellor’s Committee on Access and Accommodation.

At Purdue from 2003-06, Martinez served as assistant director for conflict resolution in the Affirmative Action Office. He investigated and prepared University responses to Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) charges of discrimination and harassment.

Martinez began his professional career as a human rights specialist with St. Paul Human Rights in St. Paul, Minn. He managed complaint investigations and assisted contractors with developing affirmative action plans.

Under the direction of the chancellor’s office, SIUE’s Office of Equal Opportunity, Access and Title IX Coordination was previously known as the Office of Institutional Compliance. “This new departmental name more accurately reflects the responsibilities of the department, as well as SIUE’s commitment to equitable treatment, inclusion and compliance with the law,” said Furst-Bowe.

Martinez will replace assistant chancellor Paul Pitts, who will retire at the end of June.

Martinez presently resides in Collinsville. He earned a bachelor’s in general studies from the University of Michigan and a juris doctorate from the University of Illinois College of Law in 1997.

Photo: SIUE’s Chad Martinez, director of the Office of Equal Opportunity, Access and Title IX Coordination.




SIUE’s Furst-Bowe Named to Malcolm Baldrige Overseers

16 June 2014, 1:29 pm

Chancellor Julie A. Furst-Bowe portrait 7-2-12U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker has appointed Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Chancellor Julie Furst-Bowe to the Board of Overseers for the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. Board members serve three-year terms without compensation.

The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award is the highest level of national recognition for performance excellence that a U.S. organization can receive. Congress established the Baldrige Program in 1987 to recognize U.S. companies for their achievements in quality and business performance and to raise awareness about the importance of quality and performance excellence in gaining a competitive edge.

To receive the Baldrige Award, an organization must have a role-model organizational management system that ensures continuous improvement in the delivery of products and/or services, demonstrates efficient and effective operations, and provides a way of engaging and responding to customers and other stakeholders.

“It is truly an honor to serve on the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award board,” Furst-Bowe said. “I look forward to working with this talented group of highly respected leaders whose goal is to not only reward, but also improve organizational excellence in a highly competitive worldwide economy.”

The board meets annually to review the work of the private sector contractor, which assists the director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in administering the Malcolm Baldrige Quality Award. The board makes suggestions for the improvement of the award process, as they deem necessary. The board reports the results of the award activities to the NIST director each year.

The board consists of approximately 11 members selected on a clear, standardized basis in accordance with applicable Department of Commerce guidelines, for their preeminence in the field of organizational performance excellence. There is balanced representation from U.S. service, manufacturing, nonprofit, education and health care industries. The board includes members who are familiar with the quality improvement operations and issues relating to competition among manufacturing companies, service companies, small businesses, health care providers and educational institutions.

Including Furst-Bowe, the board members are:

Rulon F. Stacey (Chair), President and CEO, Fairview Health Services

Bryan Bushick, Founder and Principal, Falcon Health Solutions, LLC

Robert R. Hagans, Jr., Executive Vice President, AARP

Warren Harris, President and Chief Operating Officer, Tata Technologies

Gail L. Hendrickson, Executive Vice President, Alliance to Save Energy

Terry Holliday, Commissioner of Education, Kentucky Department of Education

Reatha Clark King, Corporate Director and Chairman of the Board, National Association of Corporate Directors

Brian Lassiter, President, Performance Excellence Network

Robert F. Pence, President and CEO, Freese and Nichols, Inc.

Liza Nickerson Seltzer, Executive Vice President, Applied Clinical Intelligence LLC

Paul Westbrook, Vice President, INOVA Health Systems

The Baldrige Program is the nation’s public-private partnership dedicated to performance excellence. Its mission is to improve the competitiveness and performance of U.S. organizations for the benefit of all U.S. residents. The Baldrige Performance Excellence Program is a customer-focused federal change agent that develops and disseminates evaluation criteria, manages the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, promotes performance excellence and provides global leadership in the learning and sharing of successful strategies and performance practices, principles and methodologies

Photo: SIUE Chancellor Julie Furst-Bowe.  

 




SIUE’s Wright Places 18th in Triple Jump at NCAA Championship

15 June 2014, 12:34 pm

Wright_Jatavia_NCAA

SIUE’s Jatavia Wright closed out the 2014 NCAA Division I Outdoor Track and Field Championship Friday with an 18th-place finish in the triple jump at the University Oregon’s Heyward Field.

The junior from Miami Gardens, Fla., leaped 41 feet, 5.25 inches (12.63 meters) on her first jump of the competition.

“You put it out all you can on the first jump,” said Wright. “I felt good, and I’m happy I made it (to nationals).”

Wright entered the meet as the final qualifier in a field of 24 competitors. She ultimately improved her position by six spots.

“She opened the competition well on her first jump,” said SIUE Interim Head Coach Eileen McAllister. “She finished higher than her incoming rank.”

San Diego State’s Shanieka Thomas won the meet with a jump of 45-11.25 (14.00 meters). The winning leap outdistanced her nearest opponent by more than a foot.

Wright was just five inches short of her own school record she set at the Ohio Valley Conference Championship back in May. In her only other legal jump Friday, Wright leaped 40-9.75.

With the season complete, Wright said her performance at the Championship will help for next season.

“I was able to get experience under my belt,” she said. “Next year it won’t be new. We’ll go back to Oregon again. It’s all or nothing next year. I’ll be ready and prepared.”

McAllister said Wright led a young team that is only going to get better.

“The women had a historic year,” she said. “There were too many ups and downs, though. We need to find consistency. They are a young group and have gained a lot of experience this year. I look forward to big things next year.”




Students Conclude Week at SIUE’s 2014 Healthcare Diversity Summer Camp

13 June 2014, 11:04 am

A select group of area high school students visited Southern Illinois University Edwardsville’s School of Pharmacy Thursday, June 12, during SIUE’s 2014 Healthcare Diversity Summer Camp. The week-long camp concludes today.

Students have participated in the residential summer camp that exposed them to potential careers in the areas of nursing, dental medicine and pharmacy. Participating in the weeklong sessions were the SIUE School of Nursing, SIU School of Dental Medicine and the School of Pharmacy.

Sixteen junior and high school students were chosen based on criteria that included a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average. The purpose of the camp is to expose minority students to careers in healthcare.

The campers’ experience culminates with an ACT Preparatory Crash Course Friday morning, followed by a closing ceremony sponsored by Express Scripts to close the camp. On Tuesday, students spent the day at the School of Nursing and on Wednesday, they visited the School of Dental Medicine in Alton.

Healthcare Diversity Summer Camp SOP School of Pharmacy 06-12-14

Photos:

Upper Right: School of Pharmacy’s Lindsay Schmees takes Noah Dintelman’s blood pressure as  Jarae Hess looks on.

Right: Morgan Sims learns CPR.




SIUE’s Ward Takes Fourth in NCAA Long Jump

13 June 2014, 9:35 am

Ward-La'Derrick_NCAA

La’Derrick Ward earned SIUE’s best finish at the NCAA Division I Outdoor Track and Field Championships Thursday with fourth place in the long jump at the University of Oregon’s Heyward Field.

Ward, a junior from Alorton, used his second jump to eventually secure fourth overall. He leaped 24 feet, 9.75 inches (7.56 meters).

“It was a good meet,” said Ward. “It would have been better to win, but I competed hard.”

Florida’s Marquis Dendy turned in the top jump of the event with a 26-3 (8.00m) leap on his final jump, outdistancing runner-up Willie Alexander, of Long Beach State, who jumped 25-4.5 (7.73m).

Ward opened the event with a foul and had just two more jumps to make a qualifying mark for the finals.

“It really was just to get a mark on the board,” said Ward. “The wind was just really crazy.”

He competed in the first of two flights and had a lengthy wait before learning if he would make the finals.

“I definitely wanted to go further,” said Ward. “It was a long layoff going from the first round to the finals. I was trying to keep my focus going into the finals.”

It also marked the end of the collegiate season for the SIUE men’s team, a season that included Ward leading the nation in the long jump. It also saw the emergence of sprinter Braxton Klavins and freshman Julian Harvey, who qualified for three events at the NCAA West Preliminaries.

The outdoor season is not completely over for Ward and Harvey. Ward will venture to the U.S. Nationals in Sacramento, Calif., June 29. Harvey will compete July 5-6, in Eugeneat the U.S. Junior Nationals.

SIUE has one more day of competition left at the national championship. Jatavia Wright, SIUE’s hopeful in the women’s triple jump, will compete today at 5:25 p.m.




SIUE Recognizes the Work of Facilities Management Staff on Flag Day

12 June 2014, 5:22 pm

United States Flag 05-22-14Saturday, June 14, marks Flag Day, the federal holiday that commemorates the adoption of the United States flag. The observation of the holiday offers a moment to recognize the hard work of the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville staff members who provide day-to-day care for the flags on campus.

Since the SIUE campus was established in 1957, operating engineers have been caring for the United States Flag. Today, a team of 20 operating engineers share the responsibility of caring for the two flags on campus, located on the Stratton Quadrangle at the center of Hairpin Drive and at Korte Stadium.

They are responsible for procuring and caring for the U.S. flag in accordance with the United States Flag Code. The Flag Code provides detailed instructions handling and care of the flag including:

  • Position and manner of display
  • Respect for flag
  • Conduct during hoisting, lowering or passing of flag

The team of operating engineers also observes the Flag Code regulation regarding disposal of the flag, stating “when a flag is so tattered that it no longer fits to serve as a symbol of the United States, it should be destroyed in a dignified manner, preferably by burning.”

When the flags displayed on campus become worn or torn beyond repair, they are sent to the American Legion or American Heritage for ceremonial disposal.

Each time an operating engineer joins the team, he or she receives instruction in the proper handling and care of the flag.

“We provide a detailed pamphlet of information to the operating engineers,” said Brian Weiler, lead plant operating engineer. “About half of the operating engineers are retired from the military so they have some familiarity with the flag rules, but we want to make sure we do everything right.”

The records of military service among the team add significant meaning to another one of the flag responsibilities – lowering the flag to honor fallen soldiers. In accordance with the Illinois Flag Display Act, flags are flown at half-staff day of the funeral of every fallen Illinois soldier and the two days preceding that day.

In these instances, Kenn Neher, vice chancellor for administration, receives notification from the Office of the Governor through the Illinois Board of Higher Education that Governor Pat Quinn has issued a proclamation that the United States Flag should be flown at half-staff. The proclamation is forwarded to the engineers and, in accordance with the Flag Code, the flags on campus are lowered.

“You feel a sense of patriotism when you raise and lower the flag because you understand the reasons for it,” said Weiler. “When we are instructed to lower the flag to half-staff, I always make sure to learn the serviceman or servicewoman’s name of who passed away out of respect. If anyone asked, we want to be able to tell them the reason we are moving the flag.”




Students Learn about Careers in Nursing and Dentistry at SIUE’s 2014 Healthcare Diversity Summer Camp

12 June 2014, 2:37 pm

Nursing1, Allyssa DollisonA select group of area high school students heard lessons about CPR, the human anatomy and dentistry at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville’s 2014 Healthcare Diversity Summer Camp.

Students have participated all week in the residential summer camp that exposed them to potential careers in the area of nursing, dental medicine and pharmacy. Participating in the weeklong sessions are the SIUE School of Nursing, SIU School of Dental Medicine and the SIUE School of Pharmacy.

Sixteen junior and high school students were chosen based on criteria that included a minimum 3.0 accumulative grade point average. The purpose of the camp is to expose minority students to careers in healthcare.

Dental1, Jarae Hess

On Tuesday, students spent the day at the SIUE School of Nursing and on Wednesday, they vis

ited the SIU School of Dental Medicine in Alton. Today, students are at the SIUE School of Pharmacy.

SIUE School of Nursing: The SIUE School of Nursing’s fully accredited programs are committed to creating excellence in nursing leadership through innovative teaching, evidence-based practice, quality research, patient advocacy and community service. Enrolling nearly 1,000 students in its baccalaureate, master’s and doctoral programs, the School develops leaders in pursuit of shaping the nursing profession and impacting the health care environment. Through expanded programs located on the SIU Carbondale campus and SIU School of Medicine campus, the SIUE School of Nursing is helping to solve the region’s shortage of baccalaureate-prepared nurses and enhance the quality of nursing practice within hospitals and medical centers.

Nursing2, Jordan Harden, Philip Siganga, Kennedy Reed and Jean LaFollette (instructor)SIU School of Dental Medicine: School of Dental Medicine students manage approximately 35,000 patient visits each year at its patient clinics in Alton and East St. Louis. In addition, students offer oral health treatment, screenings and education to more than 10,000 people annually through a wide variety of off-campus community outreach events. These opportunities provide students the training they need to graduate and become highly skilled dentists. As the only dental school within 200 miles of the St. Louis metropolitan area, the region depends on the School of Dental Medicine as a vital oral healthcare provider.

SIUE School of Pharmacy: Today’s pharmacists improve patients’ lives through the medication and education they provide. Dedicated to developing a community of caring pharmacists, the SIUE School of Pharmacy curriculum is nationally recognized as a model that offers students a unique combination of classroom education, research, community service and patient care. The School of Pharmacy’s areas of excellence include the Center for Drug Discover and Design; chronic pain research and practice; and diabetes research and practice. As the only downstate Illinois pharmacy doctorate program, the SIUE School of Pharmacy is addressing the growing need for highly trained pharmacists in a rapidly growing field.

Photos:

Allyssa Dollison tries her hands at CPR during the nursing segment on Tuesday.

Students listen to nursing instructor. Pictured from left to right are Jordan Harden, Philip Siganga, Kennedy Reed and Jean LaFollette, instructor in Family Health/Community Health Nursing.

Jarae Hess exams a skull in class at the SIU School of Dental Medicine.

Dr. Kevin Rowland, associate professor in the SIU School of Dental Medicine, explains some aspects of the human anatomy to students. Students pictured from left to right at the light table: Brianna Richards, Haeli Valdez and Noah Dintelman. Standing beside Rowland is dental student Blake Ferando.




Drytac Sponsors SIUE Solar Car Team

12 June 2014, 1:49 pm

SIUE Solar Car

The award-winning SIUE School of Engineering Solar Car Team received a nearly $8,000 donation and sponsorship from Drytac Corporation. A Hot Press™ Heated Glass Top Vacuum Press was donated to aid the team with solar array encapsulation, a sealing process which increases the solar cell panel’s strength and protects it from external elements.

“The SIUE Solar Car Team used a Drytac press to encapsulate our first array which powered our car, ‘Black Nova,’ in the 2013 Formula Sun Grand Prix Race in Austin, Texas,” said Zachary Crawford, student project director of the SIUE Solar Car Team. “In order to help us continue our experiments, Drytac generously donated a press to the team.

“Information collected with these experiments will not only help the team to create efficient, lightweight and flexible solar panels, but also will make panels like this more accessible to the general public.”

Crawford reached out to Drytac Corporation to explain how vacuum presses were beginning to be used to encapsulate and protect solar cells from environment conditions.

“Business and educational partnerships are a key factor in cultivating solutions for our expanding global energy needs,” said Jerry Hill, vice president of new market business development for Drytac Corporation. “Drytac is proud to contribute to the development of alternative manufacturing methods for solar cells, whereby one day any individual will be able to produce them. Free and clean energy is our ultimate gift to society.”

The SIUE Solar Car Team is managed by experienced, student directors working to enable team members to learn about solar energy, apply class theory to real world applications and to be a part of a unique project. The team benefits from the diversity of disciplines and experiences from its all student members.

With mostly juniors and seniors in various fields from business and marketing to electrical and mechanical engineering, the team represents a variety of groups from multiple disciplines at SIUE.

Drytac is an international manufacturer of adhesive-coated products, including graphic films, window films, double-sided tapes, self-adhesive print media, label stock, industrial adhesives, and heat-activated and pressure-sensitive laminates and mounting adhesives. Drytac can also create unique customized adhesive products to customer specifications. For more information, please visit www.drytac.com.




SIUE Alum Brings Memorial Charity Ride to His Alma Mater

12 June 2014, 1:36 pm

cougar shot2

Jay Knight rolled into the Hairpin at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville early this morning on his bicycle. The alum stopped at SIUE as part of his efforts to raise $100,000 for sick children and pay homage to his friend and fallen soldier, Lance Corporal Johnny Strong.

Knight left SIUE headed to St. Louis Children’s Hospital, accompanied by Dean Bennett. There he planned to visit hospital staff, who work with sick children. Monies raised will be used to purchase video games, toys, books and other fun items for children and are dispersed to a network of more than 70 hospitals worldwide.

Knight will donate the contributions in memory of his fellow Marine to Child’s Play Charity, a game industry charity that uses contributions to improve the lives of children while they are in the hospital.

Knight and his partner in the bike-a-thon, Denny Salisbury of Kelseyville, Calif., left the Boston Convention Center on April 11. Salisbury met Knight today at St. Louis Children’s Hospital. The two former Marines plan to end their memorial ride on Aug. 30 at the Seattle Convention Center.

For more information, visit Pax2Pax.

Photos:

Jay Knight (right) biked to campus early this morning as part of his Johnny Strong Memorial Charity Ride. Also pictured is Dean Bennett, who will accompany Knight to St. Louis Children’s Hospital.




Granite City’s New Coffeehouse Thrives from SBDC Business Expertise

12 June 2014, 1:27 pm

The freshly brewed aroma of success is wafting through a new coffeehouse in Granite City thanks to top-notch business expertise provided by the Metro East Small Business Development Center.

Kool Beanz Café, 1316 Niedringhaus Avenue, opened Tuesday, April 15, as a much-needed addition to the city’s new downtown arts and entertainment district. Founder and Granite City native Victoria Arguelles, along with her husband Eduardo and brother David Edrington, had planned this start-up for years. When the team intensified efforts in 2013 to put Arguelles’ childhood dream into action, they called upon the Metro East SBDC.

At no cost to Arguelles, the Metro East SBDC provided extensive one-on-one business services including marketing research, business plan review and expertise on preparing financial documents and loan request. The SBDC’s goal, according to Director Patrick McKeehan, is to provide timely and effective assistance to entrepreneurs like Arguelles to increase their chances for success.

“Victoria did the right thing by reaching out to us early in her business planning process,” said McKeehan. “My staff and I were immediately impressed by her focus, determination and cooperation.”

Kool Beanz, open early Monday through Saturday, offers specialty coffees, gourmet teas and fresh baked goods to morning patrons. The Café also features a healthy lunch menu of freshly prepared sandwiches, salads, soups, fruit smoothies and desserts. It reopens Saturday nights from 6 -11 p.m. featuring coffeehouse drinks and live entertainment. Conveniently located within a recently renovated historic building across from the city’s new movie theatre, the Café attracts both music lovers and movie enthusiasts.

In addition to satisfying the needs of avid coffee drinkers and hungry patrons, Kool Beanz has become a gathering place for a weekly seniors group, a women’s Bible study and local business groups. There has even been a few asking about the space for future weddings and baby showers, Arguelles said.

The early success of Kool Beanz is largely due to Arguelles and her start-up enthusiasm.  To prove the validity of her business idea, Arguelles spent many weekends test-marketing her coffees at local garage sales and community events. The field experience and customer feedback convinced her to pursue a longstanding passion.

“When I was a little girl, my mom and dad took me to a diner,” Arguelles said. “Ever since that day, I wanted to have my own tea house. This is a dream come true. I am so appreciative of Metro East SBDC staff and their restaurant consultant Tiffany Smith for working very hard to put my business plan into action.

“I came to the Metro East SBDC for a wide range of business expertise. These individuals generously shared their time and talents and worked with me to make sure I was ready. I’m thankful for their honesty and objectivity. They told me what I needed to hear, anticipate and do in order to make this venture successful.”

Arguelles and Kool Beanz Café will continue to receive support from the Metro East SBDC, McKeehan said. “We are committed to helping Victoria fulfill her childhood dream and become a lasting small business success.”

The Metro East SBDC assists start-up ventures as well as existing businesses headquartered in the nine-county Metro East region of Calhoun, Jersey, Madison, Bond, Clinton, St. Clair, Washington, Monroe and Randolph. It is a no-cost service funded, in part, by the U.S. Small Business Administration, Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, and Southern Illinois University Edwardsville in support of the region’s business community.

By aiding entrepreneurs and companies in defining their path to success, the SBDC Network positively impacts the Metro East by strengthening the business community, creating and retaining new jobs and encouraging new investment. It enhances the region’s economic interests by providing one-stop assistance to individuals by means of counseling, training, research and advocacy for new ventures and existing small businesses. When appropriate, the SBDC strives to affiliate its ties to the region to support the goals and objectives of both the SIUE School of Business and the University at large.

To learn how the SBDC can help your small business, contact the Metro East SBDC at (618) 650-2929 or sbdcedw@gmail.com




Klavins Finishes 16th in NCAA 400M Semifinals

12 June 2014, 9:05 am

Klavins_Braxton

SIUE’s Braxton Klavins ran his second fastest 400-meter race of the season Wednesday, but did not qualify for the finals at the NCAA Division I Outdoor Track and Field Championships at the University of Oregon’s Heyward Field.

The junior from Lake Zurich ran 46.40 seconds in the third of three semifinal heats. He finished fourth in the heat and 16th overall. The top two finishers in each heat and the next two fastest times advanced to Friday’s final.

“He competed great and was a fraction of a second too fast in the first 200 meters,” said SIUE Interim Head Coach Eileen McAllister.

Klavins said his strategy was to stay with the leaders and adjust his position once he was on the final straightaway.

“I saw the whole field start pushing the pace, so I had to go with them,” Klavins said. “I’m not disappointed with my time or how I ran. Being able to compete against the top athletes in the country, and know that I can compete with them, will make me more experienced and a better athlete.”

Mike Berry, of Oregon, won the third heat in 45.41. Deon Lendore, of Texas A&M posted the fastest time in the semifinals at 45.18.

McAllister said Klavins, who will return for his senior season in 2015, has turned in a great season for the Cougars.

“Meet after meet he was our runner of the meet. He scored a lot of points for us this season. He is a testament to hard work,” she added.

The focus now shifts to SIUE’s jumpers. La’Derrick Ward will be aiming for the top spot at 6:30 p.m. Thursday in the trials and finals of the long jump. Jatavia Wright will make her bid for a national title Friday at 5:25 p.m. in the trials and final of the triple jump.




SIUE Athletics Receives National Award at NACMA

11 June 2014, 9:23 am

JFB_Pepsi_1SIUE Athletics earned a national award Tuesday for its promotion last fall when Cougar men’s soccer fans broke a world record for the most Pepsi NEXT cans opened at one time. See the video.

The award was announced at the annual National Association of Collegiate Marketing Administrators (NACMA) workshop. SIUE had been one of three finalists with Long Beach State University and Portland State for the Sponsorship Activation Group II Best of Awards.

“This is a tremendous honor for our University, our department, and our marketing team,” said SIUE Senior Associate Athletic Director for External Affairs Jason Coomer.  “The recognition our marketing staff has gained across the country as being one of the up-and-coming marketing teams is something of which we are very proud. The efforts of our staff and our University to gain this national notoriety are exciting. We look forward to continuing to build on this success.”

Winners were selected by an awards committee comprised of NCAA Division I athletic administrators from across the country. This was the first time SIUE has been nominated for a NACMA award since moving to the D-I level.

Partnering with SIUE Student Affairs, Pepsi, and Pepsi NEXT, SIUE Athletics got the 2013-14 season off to a record start. Nearly 2,000 fans at SIUE’s exhibition game against Milwaukee simultaneously popped Pepsi NEXT cans. The event was held in conjunction with the SIUE Experience, which welcomes incoming freshmen to campus for the start of the year.

“We enjoy a great relationship with our partners from Pepsi,” added Coomer. “We are just happy to be able to bring recognition to our University and department as well as to our loyal corporate partners at Pepsi.”

Photo:  SIUE Chancellor Julie Furst-Bowe (lower right) joins with Cougar soccer fans in simultaneously opening Pepsi NEXT cans.




Three Cougars Compete for NCAA Track and Field Titles

10 June 2014, 8:22 am

NCAA_outdoor14The outdoor track and field season finale begins Wednesday with three SIUE student-athletes competing for an NCAA Division I Championship at the University of Oregon’s Hayward Field in Eugene.

Braxton Klavins (400 meters), La’Derrick Ward (long jump), and Jatavia Wright (triple jump) will be challenging for individual national titles in their respective events.

Live video coverage of the Championship is available online at www.watchespn.com.

Klavins begins his quest Wednesday in the semifinals of the 400. He qualified for the national finals with a time of 46.13 at the NCAA West Preliminaries, finishing 11th overall.

A junior, Klavins was named the Ohio Valley Conference’s Male Athlete of the Championship at the league meet held May 2-3 at SIUE’s Korte Stadium.

Ward, who entered the postseason with the nation’s longest jump at 26 feet, 3 inches, took fifth at the NCAA West Preliminaries with a leap of 25-0.75.

The long jump trials and finals are set to begin at 6:30 p.m. Thursday.

Wright earned her spot at the national championship with a 12th-place finish at the NCAA West Preliminaries with a leap of 41-7.25. Her best leap of the season came at the OVC Championships with a jump of 41-10.75.

The triple jump trials and finals are scheduled for 5:25 p.m. Friday.

Below is a list of event times and dates for SIUE student-athletes.

Wednesday, June 11

7 p.m. – Braxton Klavins – 400-meter semifinals

Thursday, June 12

6:30 p.m. – La’Derrick Ward – Long Jump trials and final

Friday, June 13

5:25 p.m. – Jatavia Wright – Triple Jump trials and final

7:50 p.m. – Braxton Klavins – 400-meter finals




SIU President Randy Dunn Welcomes High School Students to SIUE and Tours Other Parts of Campus

9 June 2014, 5:19 pm

Dunn

Southern Illinois University President Randy Dunn surprised a group of high school students Monday on their first day of the 2014 SIUE Healthcare Diversity Summer Camp. Dunn also toured and met with officials at SIUE’s NCERC, the SIUE School of Pharmacy, and the Center for Spirituality and Sustainability.

Julie

Dunn welcomed the 16 junior and senior high school students and encouraged them to seriously consider the SIUE School of Pharmacy.

“Anytime we get an opportunity to recruit talented students and talk about the wonderful things they’re doing at the School of Pharmacy, we see that as a plus,” Dunn said.

Julie, Dunn, Caupert

Also greeting the summer camp students was SIUE Chancellor Julie Furst-Bowe, who encouraged students to take advantage of the campus’ wonderful recreational facilities.

“The brief visit by the president and the chancellor provided great exposure for our camp participants to our University’s administration, said Dr. Lakesha Butler, clinical associate professor in the School of Pharmacy.

The following is a schedule for the Healthcare Diversity Summer Camp for the remainder of the week:

• Tuesday – students will hear from SIUE nursing faculty and students regarding a future career in nursing and spend time in the Nursing Simulation Lab

• Wednesday – students will travel to the SIU School of Dental Medicine in Alton to explore the career opportunities in the field of dentistry

• Thursday – camp participants will learn about prospective careers in the field of pharmacy and students will receive hands-on CPR training

• Friday – campers will take an ACT Preparatory Crash Course in the morning, followed by a closing ceremony sponsored by Express Scripts to culminate the camp

Gireesh, Neher, Dunn, Durr, Furst-Bowe

SIUE School of Pharmacy: Today’s pharmacists improve patients’ lives through the medication and education they provide. Dedicated to developing a community of caring pharmacists, the SIUE School of Pharmacy curriculum is nationally recognized as a model that offers students a unique combination of classroom education, research, community service and patient care. The School of Pharmacy’s areas of excellence include the Center for Drug Discover and Design; chronic pain research and practice; and diabetes research and practice. As the only downstate Illinois pharmacy doctorate program, the SIUE School of Pharmacy is addressing the growing need for highly trained pharmacists in a rapidly growing field.

SIUE School of Nursing:  The SIUE School of Nursing’s fully accredited programs are committed to creating excellence in nursing leadership through innovative teaching, evidence-based practice, quality research, patient advocacy and community service. Enrolling nearly 1,000 students in its baccalaureate, master’s and doctoral programs, the School develops leaders in pursuit of shaping the nursing profession and impacting the health care environment. Through expanded programs located on the SIU Carbondale campus and SIU School of Medicine campus, the SIUE School of Nursing is helping to solve the region’s shortage of baccalaureate-prepared nurses and enhance the quality of nursing practice within hospitals and medical centers.

SIU School of Dental Medicine: School of Dental Medicine students manage approximately 35,000 patient visits each year at its patient clinics in Alton and East St. Louis. In addition, students offer oral health treatment, screenings and education to more than 10,000 people annually through a wide variety of off-campus community outreach events. These opportunities provide students the training they need to graduate and become highly skilled dentists. As the only dental school within 200 miles of the St. Louis metropolitan area, the region depends on the School of Dental Medicine as a vital oral healthcare provider.

Photos:

SIU President Randy Dunn talks with students at the 2014 SIUE Healthcare Diversity Summer Camp.

SIUE Chancellor Julie Furst-Bowe congratulates students for being selected to participate in the summer camp.

SIU President Randy Dunn and SIUE Chancellor Julie Furst-Bowe visit with Director John Caupert (right) at NCERC at SIUE.

Part of Monday’s visit also included a tour of the SIUE School of Pharmacy. Pictured from left to right:  SIUE School of Pharmacy Dean Gireesh Gupchup, Vice Chancellor of Administration Ken Neher, SIU President Randy Dunn; Executive Assistant in the Office of the Chancellor Kim Durr and SIUE Chancellor Julie Furst-Bowe.

 




50 Receive Degrees at SIU Dental Medicine Commencement

9 June 2014, 2:23 pm

SDM-class-2014_001[2]Keynote speaker Dr. Paul F. Kattner, an orthodontist with Kattner Orthodontics in Waukegan, Ill., addressed the 2014 graduating class at the Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine commencement Saturday, June 7. The ceremony was held in SIUE’s Meridian Ballroom in the Morris University Center and can be seen on siuetv.

Fifty students received a doctor of dental medicine degree. A record 12 alumni participated in the Hooding Ceremony. The School allows an alumnus who is an immediate family member of a graduate to hood their family member as they walk across the stage.

SIUE Chancellor Julie Furst-Bowe congratulated the graduating class. “While we know higher education is heavily promoted today, an advanced professional degree is over and above the typical level of achievement,” she said.

Kattner acknowledged that the class is absolutely positioned for success, but urged them to live a life of significance. “Use great care when you choose your measure of success,” he said. “The choice that you make is going to shape you.

“Pursuing significance smoothes down the sharp edges of pursuing success. It requires the adoption of a radical notion that your goals are not necessarily the most important things in every one of life’s transactions. Choose to take notice of the needs of people around you. It requires a conscious decision to walk toward that person’s needs.”

At the highest designation of achievement, Kattner has obtained Fellowship status with the American College of Dentists, the International College of Dentists, the Academy of Dentistry International, the Pierre Fauchard Academy and the World Federation of Orthodontists. He is a lifetime member of the American Association of Orthodontists, the American Dental Association, as well as the Illinois State and Chicago Dental Societies.

SIU SDM Dean Dr. Bruce Rotter provided five points of advice for the graduates. “Strive to perform the best dentistry that you can and continue a life-long pursuit of knowledge and excellence,” he said. “Treat both your patients and your staff with utmost respect.

“Maintain a moral compass, striving to do what’s right. Maintain a social conscience and share your expertise with those less fortunate, who may need your help.

“Return the love and support to your family which they have given to you and which they so richly deserve.”

Photo: The SIU School of Dental Medicine Class of 2014.




2014 SIUE Healthcare Diversity Summer Camp Begins Today

9 June 2014, 8:35 am

Sixteen junior and senior high school students from the metropolitan area are on the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville campus this week to take part in the 2014 SIUE Healthcare Diversity Summer Camp.

“The primary purpose of the residential camp is to expose minority high school students to healthcare careers that are offered at SIUE,” said Dr. Lakesha Butler, clinical associate professor in the School of Pharmacy, “and provide them with valuable knowledge and skills that will aide them in becoming successful future college students.”

This marks the sixth year of SIUE offering a camp for minority students in the area of pharmacy and healthcare. In 2009, Butler was instrumental in starting a camp to introduce the field of pharmacy to minority students. In 2013, the camp was expanded to include nursing and dental medicine.

Camp participants had to demonstrate the following criteria for eligibility:

• A minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average

• Be a rising junior or senior high school student from Madison, St. Clair or St. Louis counties

• A minimum of two years of both math and science classes

• A complete a written essay

The week-long camp began at 7 a.m. today with students checking into Bluff Hall. Throughout the day, camp students will be introduced to a variety of SIUE resources and listen to speakers from the Office of Admissions, Kimmel Student Involvement Center, the Career Development Services and Student Opportunities for Academic Results (SOAR).

The following is a schedule for the Healthcare Diversity Summer Camp for the remainder of the week:

• Tuesday – students will hear from SIUE nursing faculty and students regarding a future career in nursing and spend time in the Nursing Simulation Lab.

• Wednesday – students will travel to the SIU School of Dental Medicine in Alton to explore the career opportunities in the field of dentistry.

• Thursday – camp participants will learn about prospective careers in the field of pharmacy. In addition, students will receive hands-on CPR training.

• Friday – campers will take an ACT Preparatory Crash Course in the morning, followed by a closing ceremony sponsored by Express Scripts to culminate the camp.

“All students are able to participate in the weeklong camp free of charge due to the generous support of Walgreens. This includes all housing, meals and travel cost,” said Butler. “We are truly grateful for the continued support of our camp corporate sponsors, without them this free camp would not be possible.”

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville provides students with a high quality, affordable education that prepares them for successful careers and lives of purpose. Built on the foundation of a broad-based liberal education, and enhanced by hands-on research and real-world experiences, the academic preparation SIUE students receive equips them to thrive in the global marketplace and make our communities better places to live. Situated on 2,660 acres of beautiful woodland atop the bluffs overlooking the natural beauty of the Mississippi River’s rich bottomland and only a short drive from downtown St. Louis, the SIUE campus is home to a diverse student body of nearly 14,000.

 




Meyers Named to ITA Women’s Tennis Collegiate Hall of Fame

7 June 2014, 4:14 pm

Meyers_BobSIUE Athletics Hall of Famer Bob Meyers will enter the Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA) Women’s Tennis Collegiate Hall of Fame this fall.

Meyers will be among six Class of 2014 inductees. The enshrinement ceremony is scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 15, at the College of William and Mary in Willamsburg, Va.

The other honorees will be Northwestern University’s Katrina Adams, USC’s Stacy Margolin (Potter), Cecelia Martinez from San Francisco State University, University of Texas coach Jeff Moore and Lindsay Morse (Bennett) of UC Irvine.

Meyers inaugurated the SIUE women’s tennis program in 1979 and coached the team for 10 seasons. He left SIUE on a high note with a fourth-consecutive NCAA Division II title. Under Meyers’ leadership, the Cougars won national titles from 1986 to 1989 with the final championship played at St. Louis’ Forest Park with SIUE as the host institution.

He coached 32 players to All-American status, including three singles titles and two doubles titles. While all four of his national championship teams are members of the SIUE Athletics hall of Fame, there are six players who also have been named to the Hall of Fame. They are Lilian Almedia, Portia (George) Morrow, Christina Bokelund, Elisabeth Calander, Joan Mahon-Finder, and Michelle (Wreen) Staroba.

Meyers was the NCAA Division II Coach of the Year for women’s tennis in 1983 and later earned the same honor for men’s tennis in 1988.

In addition to his coaching successes, Meyers served on the NCAA Men’s and Women’s National Tennis Committee and was co-chairman of the ITCA/NCAA Men’s National Rankings as well as the chair of the men’s NCAA Midwest Regional Committee.

Meyers earned both bachelor’s and master’s from SIUE in physical education (1971) and counselor education (1972), respectively




SIUE Alum Pedals to Raise Money for Sick Children and to Honor Slain Soldier

6 June 2014, 10:55 am

Pax2Pax

For almost two months, a Southern Illinois University Edwardsville alum has been riding his bicycle about 55 miles every day, with a 70-pound bike trailer in tow. And if all goes according to schedule, Jay Knight expects to arrive in Edwardsville Sunday night.

“It seemed wrong not to do something to exemplify the good things about his life and to honor him in one final salute,” said Jay Knight of his friend and fellow Marine, Lance Corporal Johnny Strong, who died in combat in Iraq.

Knight graduated from SIUE in 2013 with a bachelor’s in economics. He is part of a two-man team biking across the country to raise money for sick children and pay homage to the fallen soldier from Waco, Texas. Riding along with Knight is Denny Salisbury of Kelseyville, Calif. The pair left the Boston Convention Center on April 11 and will conclude their bike-a-thon on Aug. 30 at the Seattle Convention Center.

The cyclists are scheduled to arrive in the Edwardsville and Granite City by June 8. The two will stay in the vicinity for several days and then leave from SIUE’s Hairpin Drive at 8 a.m. Thursday, June 12. The pair expects to arrive at St. Louis Children’s Hospital at 11 a.m. the same day.

The purpose of all the pedaling is to raise $100,000 that will be given to Child’s Play Charity, a game industry charity that uses contributions to improve the lives of children while they are in the hospital. Monies are spent to purchase video games, toys, books and other fun items for children and are dispersed to a network of more than 70 hospitals worldwide.

Knight and Salisbury are also calling their Johnny Strong Memorial Charity Ride, Pax2Pax, because they are biking from one Penny Arcade Expo (Pax) to another.

Knight and Strong were stationed together at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center in Twentynine Palms, Calif. An East Moline native, Knight recalls his friend of two years.

“Johnny always had his nose in a screen, whether it was the television, computer or a little hand held video game,” Knight said. “He had decided he wanted to be a programmer and go into the game industry when he got out.

“Whenever we talked about death, it was always in jest. We understood that we were in a war zone. And we knew we had a job to do.”

While on a security patrol, Strong was shot and killed by a sniper in 2007. He was 21 years old.

Now, seven years later, his friends are biking across America.

While the bicycle-duo is in the Edwardsville area, they will hold several fundraisers. One will be from 7-9 p.m. Friday, June 13 at Big Daddy’s Patio Bar & Grill in downtown Edwardsville.

“It’s been amazing being on this journey and getting to see some of the children that the donations will help,” said Knight.

Photo: Pictured are Denny Salisbury (left) and Jay Knight at their Cleveland Clinic Children’s stop.

 




East St. Louis Charter High School Alumna Earns Doctorate in Chemistry

5 June 2014, 4:50 pm

Dr. Chasity Love-Nkansah2

A Southern Illinois University Edwardsville East St. Louis Charter High School (CHS) alumna recalls when her late grandfather’s homework requirements consisted of her reading the dictionary and performing well on coursework.

A loving, motivating and cultivating environment is what helped steer Chasity Bre’Shay Love-Nkansah to academic excellence. Her most recent educational feat occurred on May 18 when she earned a doctorate in chemistry from Purdue University in Lafayette, Ind. Her research focused on using analytical chemistry to characterize and detect small biological compounds, while also developing mass spectrometry methods to improve ion sensitivity.

And while Love-Nkansah received support from her mother, grandparents (the late Maurice Tweed and Lorraine Tweed) and the CHS administration and staff, others calculated a bleak future for her because of the challenges of her hometown environment.

“I’ve had to prove to them wrong every step of the way,” said Love-Nkansah. “When I was leaving high school, some people told me that although I was one of the smartest students at Charter (High School), I would not succeed in the real world, because things are harder and more difficult.”

Love-Nkansah graduated as valedictorian from CHS in 2005. She graduated cum laude in 2009 from Southern Illinois University Carbondale, with a bachelor’s in chemistry and a specialization in forensics. In expressing interest to go to Purdue, one SIUC instructor warned her of the difficulties of getting into the doctoral program. She passed departmental qualifiers to enter the doctoral program in six months and went to Purdue on a full-ride teaching and researching stipend.

Dr. Chasity Love-Nkansah

“Chasity has always been a driven child,” said Lorraine Tweed. “At the age of eight, she was looking through her aunt’s high school award book and said she was going to have more awards in her book when she graduated … and she did.”

As a student, Love-Nkansah got A’s and B’s and had an inclination to the science field, said her grandmother.

“My husband was strict about education and discipline,” Tweed said. “Chasity never gave us any trouble. But there was that one time when she knew her curfew was at 11 p.m. She came home at 11:05 p.m., and the door was locked.

“She never did that again.”

Love-Nkansah’s stories of success came as no surprise to Anthony Neal, former CHS director and president and partner of Educational Equity Consultants in St. Louis.

“I always knew from day one that Chasity was going to stand out,” said Neal, CHS director from 2001-2009. “It was her demeanor and willingness to learn that said to me she was going to be a huge success.

“When you hold high expectations for students, it should not be a surprise when they excel.”

With a bright future ahead, Love-Nkansah is seeking the perfect occupation that fits her skill set, drive and passion. Love-Nkansah has even bigger plans for herself and her communities, both locally and globally.

“I see myself making a mark by being a support vessel for many young underrepresented and neglected children in this world,” she said. “I want to establish tutoring and mentoring facilities in the STEM fields in low-income neighborhoods. The world’s daily operations evolve around the STEM fields. We need to get our children prepared by equipping them with networking skills, providing tutors and mentors, and having accessible resources.

“It could be called ‘Love Your Neighborhood Tutoring and Mentoring.’ I would eventually like to expand the program internationally, because of ‘whom much is given, much is required,’” she said, quoting a portion of Bible scripture found in Luke 12:48.

The mission of the SIUE East St. Louis Charter High School is to prepare students who are career and college-ready upon graduation. To achieve this mission, the school and its staff will positively impact the educational and economic lives of East St. Louis, Illinois youth through individualized instruction in core academic subjects, exploration of career interests and aptitudes, assistance in realizing students’ talents, high academic goals, and expectations that graduates will become competitive employees for the 21st Century.

Photos:

Dr. Chasity B. Love-Nkansah is shown before and after her doctoral graduation ceremonies.




Three SIUE Construction Management Students Receive AGC Scholarships

3 June 2014, 1:20 pm

Three Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Construction Management students are recipients of Associated General Contractors (AGC) Education and Research Foundation scholarships. AGC awards the $2,500 renewable scholarships to students attending Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) or American Council for Construction Education (ACCE) accredited schools.

Senior Derek Casey, from Newton, was awarded the Richard and Roxelyn Pepper Scholarship. Casey is an intern for Connor & Connor Engineering and Surveying Co. in Robinson. As part of his construction management major, he is specializing in land surveying.  Casey is active in the SIUE chapter of the American Concrete Institute (ACI). Richard Pepper is chairman emeritus of Pepper Construction Group LLC in Chicago

Senior Michael Gagnon, from Glen Carbon, has received the Textura Scholarship. Gagnon is a project engineer intern at S. M. Wilson & Co. He joined the firm in January, and has worked on the health and life safety renovation of an elementary school for the Alton School District and the construction of Alton High School’s new athletic fields.  Located in Deerfield, Textura is a producer of construction management software.

Senior Jared Kraus, from Freeburg, was awarded the Byron and Janice Farrell Scholarship.  Kraus is an intern for Byrne & Jones Construction in St. Louis. He is an active member of Phi Kappa Psi and is a member of the SIUE Associated Schools of Construction competition team. Byron Farrell is a past president of Helmkamp Construction Company in East Alton

Casey, Gagnon, and Kraus were among four Illinois students to earn AGC Foundation scholarships this year. AGC awarded scholarships to 127 engineering students across the country in 2014. The $2,500 annual scholarships can be renewed for up to three years.




SIUE Psychology Dept. Receives APA National Service Award

2 June 2014, 1:30 pm

Bartels-Lynn_ MentoringThe Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Department of Psychology is the recipient of the American Psychological Association (APA) Departmental Award for Culture of Service in the Psychological Sciences.

“For our department’s service activity to be nationally recognized by our discipline’s flagship organization is truly gratifying and exciting,” said Paul Rose, Ph.D., associate professor and chair of the Department of Psychology within SIUE’s School of Education.

In the APA’s award letter, SIUE’s Department of Psychology was cited as a department that “exemplifies what a culture of service to the discipline should be, through its:

  • Support of faculty mentoring of students and colleagues
  • Engaging in service to the community
  • Participating on university committees
  • Editing journals
  • Reviewing grant and research proposals
  • Making psychological science accessible to the general public”

The APA went on to say the “department demonstrates its commitment to service by providing faculty role models and treating service as a valued part of academic activity.”

The APA will provide a formal citation along with a $5,000 award. The APA is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the U.S.

The APA is the world’s largest association of psychologists, with nearly 130,000 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students as its members.  Its mission is to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people’s lives.

Photo: SIUE’s Lynn Bartels, associate professor of psychology, mentors two students.




SIU Dental Medicine Student Syzdek Earns Fauchard Scholarship

2 June 2014, 11:46 am

Syzdek_ErinSouthern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine student Erin Syzdek has received the 2014 Foundation of the Pierre Fauchard Academy (PFA) Scholarship.

The Palatine native is a third year student. The $1,000 award recognizes a dental student who has demonstrated great potential for developing into an outstanding leader in the profession and in the community. The recipient is also expected to exemplify the qualities of integrity, imagination and initiative as well as display good communication skills.

“Erin has served the School remarkably well as Student Council president,” said Dr. Bruce Rotter, dean of the SDM.  “Her commitment and dedication to the position have earned her a second term, as she was recently re-elected by her peers to serve as president for another year.

“Without question, Erin has been an outstanding student leader, and I am confident that the integrity and dependability that she exhibits with regularity on campus will serve her well throughout her professional career.”

The Pierre Fauchard Academy is an international honorary dental organization. Its mission is to consistently focus on professionalism, integrity, and ethics worldwide, by dentists’ own conduct as worthy role models, by the advancement of dentistry to the highest level, by supporting and honoring colleagues for their distinguished work, research, contributions, and public service, and by providing excellence in programs, education, and leadership in oral health care.

Photo:  SIU School of Dental Medicine student Erin Syzdek with her Pierre Fauchad Academy award.




Three Cougars Qualify for NCAA Track and Field Championships

1 June 2014, 12:54 pm

PrintSIUE’s La’Derrick Ward, Jatavia Wright and Braxton Klavins qualified for the NCAA Division I Outdoor Track and Field Championships, which take place June 11-14 in Eugene, Ore. The Cougars competed in the West Preliminaries at the University of Arkansas’ John McDonnell Track during the weekend.

A junior from Alorton, Ward qualified for in the long jump by finishing fifth with a leap of 25 feet, 0.75 inches.

Wright is a junior from Miami Gardens, Fla. She claimed her spot in the national championships in the triple jump with a leap of 41 feet, 7.25 inches. Wright placed 12th overall.

A junior from Lake Zurich, Klavins broke the school record at 400 meters en route to a qualifying time of 46.13. He was 11th overall. Kyle Rose set the SIUE 400 record at 46.32 in 2007.

Three qualifiers is terrific progress from a year ago,” said SIUE Interim Head Coach Eileen McAllister. “But, of course, you always want more. I am so proud of the athletes and coaches. They conducted themselves wonderfully and competed strong.”

SIUE had no seniors among the group of seven competitors at the West Preliminaries, and McAllister said the experience from this season will help next season.

“The other great thing about these student-athletes returning is that all of them will be able to share their experiences with the rest of the team,” said McAllister. “They are testaments that this can be achieved, and they can provide a blueprint of how they did it.”




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