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June 2012 SIUE News Archives


June 2012


SIUE Engineers Without Borders Recognized For Community Service

29 June 2012, 3:42 pm

When Hurricane Mitch pummeled Pimienta, Honduras in 1998, it destroyed a bridge that was a vital artery for transportation in and out of the small community.

Until last summer, Pimienta residents traveled without the convenience of the bridge. Thanks to the multidisciplinary efforts of the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Engineering's chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB-USA SIUE) and collaborating entities, the Puente La Nana Bridge Culvert Project was completed and recently was selected as the Outstanding Community Service Project of the Year for 2011-2012 at the recent SIUE Kimmel Leadership Awards Ceremony.

"We are very proud to have the Puente La Nana Bridge Culvert Project recognized as an Outstanding Community Service Project," says Damien Di Vittorio, president of the EWB-USA SIUE. "The design and implementation of this project was a coordinated effort between the EWB student chapters from SIUE and SIUC, the EWB-USA Gateway Professionals Chapter, and the community in Pimienta, Honduras. The people of Pimienta hadn't had a roadway through their town in over 13 years, and the community enthusiastically welcomed this effort. They spent $8,000 toward the construction of this project and were highly involved in the implementation in a hands-on way."

Students from the SIUE Department of Mass Communications through the College of Arts and Sciences chronicled the construction efforts, capturing it on video and through photos.

The activities of EWB-USA range from the construction of sustainable systems that developing communities can own and operate without external assistance, to empowering such communities by enhancing local, technical, managerial and entrepreneurial skills. These projects are initiated by and completed with contributions from the host community working with project teams.

"Community involvement and participation are essential to the sustainability of EWB-USA projects," Di Vittorio explains. "The community in Pimienta, Honduras has been committed to this project. Recent photos of the culvert show the community has taken ownership and are proactively maintaining the roadway."

EWB-USA SIUE has previously partnered with the EWB-USA Gateway Professionals Chapter to aid in the design and implementation of a 50-foot retaining wall, a storm water drainage system and composting latrine.

Faculty advisor Chris Gordon, assistant professor and chair of the SIUE Department of Construction, said, "The projects our students have undertaken in partnership with the community of Pimienta have excellent educational and societal impact. Our students continue to deliver increasingly ambitious projects and inspire future engineering students with their exceptional work."




Planned Electrical Outage At SIUE Sunday

29 June 2012, 3:21 pm

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville will have a campus wide electrical power outage starting at 6 a.m. Sunday. Restoration should not be expected before 7 p.m. Sunday, according to SIUE Facilities Management.

The outage is to integrate the new Art & Design Building addition into the campus electrical system. Campus buildings, including residence halls, will be affected. The only buildings that should be unaffected by the outage are Cougar Village, Birger Hall, University Park, the SIUE Credit Union, Emergency Management and Safety and the athletics facilities along Stadium Drive.

According to Facilities Management, the buildings supporting the University computer network and email should not be affected by the outage. "Critical requirements in the existing Science Building and adjacent greenhouse will also be provided electrical power by generator," stated Facilities Management Director Paul Fuligni in a statement to the campus community Friday.

He added that lighting, elevators and air conditioning will not be functional in the buildings without power.




SIUE Club Team Wins Bass Fishing Championship

29 June 2012, 12:09 pm

The Southern Illinois University Edwardsville club team of Zach Hartnagel of Edwardsville and Brian Gass of O' Fallon, Ill., won the FLW College Fishing Central Conference bass fishing tournament on Lake Shelbyville last Sunday with five bass weighing 13-pounds, 2-ounces. The victory earned the team $5,000 for their fishing club. The win also helped them advance to the Central Conference Championship.

"This feels great, especially after not doing very well in our practice" said Hartnagel, a freshman criminal justice major. "Right after take-off we ran to our first spot and found three boats already sitting on it. So, we decided to adjust and ran to another spot that we had found during our practice. We went shallow and found a nice point where there was some structure-submerged timber and rock piles. We caught four right away by 7 a.m. using Brian's grandfather's homemade spinnerbaits. Then it really slowed down, and it took until noon until we were able to catch number five."

"I think the key to our victory today was just grinding it out," said Gass, a senior geographic information systems (GIS) major. "My grandpa has been making homemade spinnerbaits for 15 years, and they are a bit of a family secret. White was the color that produced for us today. He and I have both won tournaments with them in the past."

"We caught our fifth one out deep, using jigs," Hartnagel explained. "It was mid-lake area, in around 25 feet of water. We're excited to qualify for the conference championship. We live close to Carlyle Lake, and we should be able to put in some quality practice hours."

Rounding out the top five teams and also advancing to the Central Conference Championship are:

runner-up Eastern Illinois University (five bass, 12-12, $1,500); third place University of Wisconsin-Platteville (five bass, 12-4, $1,000); SIU-Carbondale in fourth (four bass, 11-10, $1,000); and fifth place Eastern Kentucky University (five bass, 10-14, $1,000).

Four regular-season qualifying events are held in each conference-Central, Northern, Southeastern, Southern and Western. The top five teams from each qualifying tournament will advance to one of five televised three-day FLW College Fishing Conference Championships, where the first-place team wins a Ranger 177TR bass boat with a 90-horsepower Evinrude or Mercury outboard. The top five teams from each conference championship advance to the national championship, where the first-place team wins $25,000 for their school and $50,000 cash plus a Ranger 177TR bass boat with a 90-horsepower Evinrude or Mercury outboard for their fishing club.

College Fishing is free to enter and FLW provides boats and drivers for each competing team along with travel allowances. All participants must be registered, full-time undergraduate students at a four-year college or university and members of a fishing club recognized by their college or university.

The next FLW College Central Conference tournament is scheduled for July 28 on the Mississippi River in La Crosse, Wis.




SIUE Senior Receives McCormick/Illinois Campus Compact Grant

29 June 2012, 10:33 am

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville senior Katelynn Alexander has been awarded the 2012-2013 McCormick/Illinois Campus Compact Grant for Student Civic Engaged Scholars. A secondary education and history major, Alexander applied for the $1,500 grant, which will provide her and several of her peers with the necessary resources to continue their Project Learn program.

Project Learn will greatly affect the community of East St. Louis and the surrounding Metro-East in a positive way by providing support to a local historical landmark; the Katherine Dunham Museum. The project also will allow students to facilitate a membership drive, maintain the appearance of the museum and hold fundraisers. The goal of this service-learning project is to vastly improve the current state of East St. Louis by encouraging community involvement, which will contribute to rebuilding community pride and improving the museum.

"Project Learn is a service-learning project designed by four School of Education students: Michelle Sutorius, Tamantha Hicks, Abby Denmark and myself," said Alexander, who is a Carrollton native. "Last summer, we attended a conference held by Illinois Campus Compact in Chicago about implementing service learning in the classroom. The conference inspired us to promote service learning in general at SIUE and to design and implement a service learning project. All the other members of the group graduated in May, and I am ecstatic that we were awarded the McCormick Grant, because it allows us to keep the project going and coming closer to achieving our goal."

By aiding the museum in increasing its mailing list and donations, the students hope to increase tourism in the Metro-East which will result in increased revenue and then will hopefully lead to further improvements in the community. Additionally, this project will promote service learning and volunteerism at SIUE and encourage students and faculty to give back to their surrounding community.

"It is my hope that Project Learn will improve the perception of East St. Louis and provide evidence that East St. Louis is improving, and cares about its community and its history," Alexander stated. "We would like to involve the community in this project, because when a community comes together for such an activity, it helps them take ownership of the project, show pride and defend its purpose."

Student Civic Engaged Scholarship Grants were awarded to six students. Eligibility criteria highlight individuals who are seeking opportunities to lead a community designated project, to develop a community-based research project, to implement creative solutions for public problems, or to explore ways to participate in the renewal and redesign of American democracy while developing their own leadership skills.




SIUE's STEM Center Welcomes High School Students to "Forensic Fridays"

28 June 2012, 1:23 pm

Nothing captures the imagination more than a fictional "whodunit," which is happening Fridays now through July on the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville campus.

A tale of mystery, mayhem and murder is unfolding during "Forensic Fridays" at the Center for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Research, Education and Outreach at SIUE.

Who killed Howard Ashland? Was it Kristi Dowrong Smith, a jealous research assistant; Gwendolyn Dolittle, a glory hungry project director; or one of the other suspects in the sinister strangling? Ashland, a 17-year-old boy genius was on the verge of discovering how to make transparent aluminum when he was found "dead," slumped over in his research lab with a note pinned to his lab coat. A mock crime scene has been staged in the Science Building basement and will stay in place until the dastardly crime is solved.

"The suspects have remained very guarded thus far," said lead officer Constable Jay Tate. "Not surprisingly, they all have stated they are innocent, and most are confused about being suspects at all. We will be relying heavily on forensic evidence to solve this case."

It is up to the more than 40 high school students from the SIUE East St. Louis Center's Upward Bound Math and Science program to figure out who committed the crime.

The students received instruction from forensic experts last week and are now utilizing real crime scene investigation tactics and technology to analyze fingerprints, clothing fibers, fluids and other evidence they will have to collect. Once the students have evaluated all of the evidence they will present their findings at a mock trial before St. Clair County Judge Laninya Cason on July 13.

"Forensic Fridays" is the brainchild of Sean Herberts, outreach coordinator with the STEM Center, and Matt Johnson, a teacher at the East St. Louis Charter High School.

For the shocking details or more information about the "Forensic Fridays" project, visit "Forensic Fridays."




The IERC at SIUE Releases Study Focusing on Confidence in College Majors

28 June 2012, 9:50 am

A study released today by the Illinois Education Research Council at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville found that women, African American students and those from low-income families expressed more confidence in their choice of college major, overall and in select science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.

An analysis of 75,698 responses from juniors from the Illinois High School Class of 2003 showed significant differences reflected by key demographics and type of planned major. According to the report, confidence in major was higher among women than men; among African American students compared with other racial and ethnic backgrounds; and among students whose family income was less than $30,000 per year.

Additional significant findings of the report included:

• Students planning to pursue a major in the health sciences and STEM teaching education were more confident in their major than students interested in other majors (STEM and non-STEM).

• Those expecting to complete vocational/technical degree or professional degree programs were more confident of their planned college majors than students expecting to finish an associate's or bachelor's degree or some graduate school.

• Students who earned a career and technical education certificate were more confident in their planned majors than those earnings an associate's or bachelor's degree, as well as those not earning a degree during the study period.

The study was prepared by Casey E. George-Jackson, an Institute of Education Sciences postdoctoral research fellow in mathematics education and adjunct assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Eric Lichtenberger, associate director for research for the IERC and an assistant research professor at SIUE.

"This knowledge could assist policymakers in their efforts to improve recruitment of students from underrepresented groups into the STEM fields," Lichtenberger said.

"Although women, students of color and low-income students are underrepresented in many STEM fields, a high proportion of underrepresented students who plan to major in STEM were very sure of their educational plans," Lichtenberger said. He added that the report shows the level of education required for particular occupations appeared to increase all students' confidence in certain types of majors.

The study poses the following questions, which researchers plan to investigate in future IERC reports:

• Are educational expectations aligned with the academic qualifications needed to enter STEM fields?

• At what point in the talent pipeline are underrepresented students with the necessary academic qualifications exiting STEM fields?

Lichtenberger said that, from a current policy standpoint, the study can be a useful tool for lawmakers as the new STEM learning exchange program is implemented in the state.

"Learning exchanges are an integral part of Illinois' Race to the Top grant and are designed to support the local development of P-20 STEM programs that connect a student's career and educational interests," the report stated.

For more information, contact Lichtenberger, the author of the report, (618) 650-2840 or (866) 799-4372. A complete report is available at ierc.siue.edu.




Hundreds Turn Out For Vandegrift's Farewell And Plaza Dedication

28 June 2012, 9:10 am

Pictured at the wall are SIUE Chancellor Vaughn Vandegrift and his wife, Sue Vandegrift.

Shielded from the sun by their umbrellas, Nancy Belck, left, former SIUE Chancellor and current Chancellor Vaughn Vandegrift, right, wave to the crowd that gathered Wednesday for Vandegrift's farewell, the dedication of the Builders of the University project and the University's first Faculty and Staff Appreciation Day.

Incoming SIUE Chancellor Julie Furst-Bowe, left, walks through the food line at Wednesday's event with outgoing Chancellor Vaughn Vandegrift, right.

An overhead photo of the Builders of the University Plaza show the design of the wall, which currently holds 2,009 names.

More than 700 current and retired faculty and staff members turned out today to give retiring Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Chancellor Vaughn Vandegrift, and his wife, Sue, a fond farewell and attend the dedication of the Builders of the University Plaza. The event also served as the institution's inaugural Faculty and Staff Appreciation Day.

People began gathering in the University's Stratton Quadrangle, just west of the new Plaza, which features the names of 2,009 past and present employees with 15 or more years of service to the institution. The crowd filtered in and out of the festivities that took place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.-some staying only a moment or two, while others lingered, enjoying the breezy summer weather, lunch, camaraderie and memories.

When speaking about the Chancellor, warm sentiments and well wishes were expressed: "He gave me a hug on Monday," said Michael Shaw, professor of inorganic chemistry through the College of Arts & Sciences and chair-elect of the department. "I'm going to miss him." Shaw will be eligible for inclusion on the wall next year. Of his 14 years at the University he said, "SIUE has been the place that gave me the best opportunities to succeed in a career. I was happy to join a department with a young faculty and the equipment to support research."

"His leadership has taken the University from where we were 10 years ago to where we are now," Shaw added. "We've faced tough economic times and his stewardship has allowed us to provide the best opportunities to our students, which is why we're here."

Becky Cooper from the Office of the Registrar has been with the institution for all of Vandegrift's eight years. She is sad to see him go, but wishes him well, "I think he was very good for the University. It's always been a very positive mood during my time here. Hopefully, the new chancellor will keep that positivity going."

Staff Senate President Mike Hamil said he thinks the chancellor has served the institution well during his stint. An employee for nine years, Hamil said he aspires to one day be on the wall and felt it was an honor to be involved in planning the inaugural employee appreciation event.

Returning to campus were numerous retired employees, including recently retired Denise MacDonald who worked in the photo services department for 27 years. About the wall, she said: "I'm so excited about it. I think it's a wonderful tribute and honor." She was employed at the University through the tenure of several chancellors. "He's the reason I retired. When he announced his retirement, so did I. I love Vaughn and Sue. He is definitely my favorite chancellor."

Kyle Stunkel, who retired a year and a half ago after nearly 25 years of working at the institution, was staff senate president at the time Vandegrift came to the University. Now working on a third SIUE degree-a master's in Social Work-she attended the festivities, commiserated with former colleagues and remembered the projects she worked on with Vandegrift. "It's so sad," she said. "He and Sue are the nicest people. They will really be missed."

Names appear as two per plaque on bricks that construct a winding wall that blends flawlessly with the campus buildings and structures. Campus architect Rick Klein designed the work, which stands as a testament of thanks to those who have dedicated their time and effort to the University's success.

"It looks like it's always been here," said Beth Giese, assistant director of University Marketing and Communications. Giese has been at the institution for seven years.

Previous SIUE Chancellor Nancy Belck attended the event, as well as the University's new leader, Julie Furst-Bowe, who takes the helm as SIUE's eighth chancellor July 1.

During his last official public appearance as the chancellor, Vandegrift thanked the University's current and retired employees for their service and commitment to the students and the institution. He also offered a few words of encouragement and advice to Furst-Bowe, "Be a good steward of the University." He then ended his remarks with an enthusiastic roar: "Go Cougars! Go Big E!"




Getting to Know Julie Furst-Bowe

22 June 2012, 8:25 am

Julie Furst-Bowe takes over as chancellor at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville on July 2. She is the eighth chancellor in SIUE's history. She arrives on the Edwardsville campus after serving as provost and vice chancellor for academic and student affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Stout in Menomonie, Wis., since 2005.

In her role as the chief academic officer for the campus, Furst-Bowe supervised the academic colleges and the following units: Enrollment Services, Student Services, International Education, Stout Online and the Discovery Center: Applied Research, Economic Development and Technology Transfer.

Since joining UWS as a faculty member in 1990, Furst-Bowe progressed through the administrative ranks as chair of the department of communications, education and training; associate vice chancellor, academic and student affairs; and assistant chancellor, assessment and continuous improvement.

Dr. Furst-Bowe will arrive on campus Monday, June 25. Though she and her husband Dan are avid Packer fans, they are looking forward to joining the Edwardsville/Glen Carbon community and getting to know all the wonderful things this region has to offer.




SIUE Builders of the University Plaza Dedication Set for June 27

20 June 2012, 3:04 pm

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville will dedicate the "Builders of the University Plaza" on Wednesday, June 27, at noon. The Plaza honors the work of employees who have helped build SIUE into a nationally recognized premier metropolitan university. To add to the dedication, this event also will serve as the University's inaugural Faculty and Staff Appreciation Day

Anyone, - faculty or staff, retiree, former employee or actively employed - who served SIUE for a total of 15 years or more, will have his/her name affixed to a plaque on a brick in the Plaza. Names will continue to be added once each year. A method to locate the names of individuals honored will be announced.

"To everyone, who will have his or her name affixed to a plaque and to those now working toward that same end, I want to express my great appreciation for your contributions on behalf of our University," SIUE Chancellor Vaughn Vandegrift said.

The Faculty and Staff Appreciation Day is sponsored by the Chancellor's Council, with free food and beverages served by administrators on the southeast corner of the Quad between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Employees will need to bring their SIUE Cougar ID card. Musical entertainment will be provided by SIUE STEEL from 11:00 until noon, and prizes will be awarded after the dedication ceremony.

"This event will be a wonderful opportunity for all of our employees to visit with their colleagues in a festive and relaxing atmosphere," said Vandegrift, who noted that all of SIUE's former chancellors have been invited to attend.

The Plaza is located in the Hairpin Loop which serves as the front door to the campus.




James R. Anderson Scholarship Recipients Announced

20 June 2012, 1:16 pm

Evgeniya Ruseva

Alyssa Beerup

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville students Alyssa Beerup and Evgeniya Ruseva each won the 2012-2013 James R. Anderson Housing Scholarship Award from University Housing. Recipients are awarded a $1,000 stipend per semester.

Beerup is a native of Yorkville, Ill., and is studying nursing. Ruseva is a native of Elmwood Park, Ill., and is studying accounting. The scholarship is given annually to academically motivated student(s) with a grade point average of 3.0 or higher and who has demonstrated civic leadership in community service and in activities with University Housing.

Beerup was named to the Dean's List in fall 2011 and is involved in Campus Crusade for Christ (CRU) and Phi Eta Sigma National Honor Society. She also is an active member of the Cougar Village community. Ruseva is involved in CRU and has participated in numerous Housing activities throughout the year.

The Housing Scholarship Award was created in memory of Anderson, a former associate director of SIUE University Housing. "We're pleased to be able to honor Jim in such a manner with this award," said Michael Schultz, director of University Housing. "He believed in the value of education in and out of the classroom, and he valued family, community involvement and service."

For more information about the James R. Anderson Housing scholarship, please contact Michael Schultz, director of University Housing at (618) 650-4628 or mschult@siue.edu.




Former SIUE Performing Arts Student In the News

20 June 2012, 8:27 am

Venezia Manuel

Venezia Manuel, 18, former Southern Illinois University Edwardsville East St. Louis Center Performing Arts student and choreographer, appeared in a recent article in the St. Louis Beacon.

Training in dance and giving performances since the age of nine, Manuel looms large on many SIUE billboards and promotional flags in Missouri and Illinois. She plans to continue her lifelong dream to dance, and equally important, to teach. Manuel will attend the University of Iowa in August on a full scholarship, where she will major in dance and education.




Students Receive Award For Project To Eliminate Sewer Waste

19 June 2012, 4:19 pm

SIUE engineering students placed third for their project proposal to eliminate sanitary sewer waste. Pictured from left to right are Dr. Ryan Fries, SIUE assistant professor of civil engineereing, graduate program director and project advisor; Erica Coombs, Allison Albrecht and Jessica Eichhorst, all recent civil engineering graduates; and Dr. Jianpeng Zhou, SIUE chair and associate professor, department of civil engineering and project advisor.

The old cliché, "When it rains, it pours" can have unfavorable, unsightly and costly ramifications in communities with aging sewer systems. But a group of Southern Illinois University Edwardsville students designed an award-winning method to eliminate sanitary sewer overflow into natural water systems.

"This is a problem in St. Louis because the sewer system is outdated," said Jessica Eichhorst, who recently graduated from SIUE with a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering. Eichhorst, along with recent civil engineering graduates Allison Albrecht and Erica Coombs, worked for one semester on a class assignment that was part of a Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD) project. Their work "Eliminating Sanitary Sewer Overflows by Implementing Green Infrastructure" garnered third place at the national PB (Parsons Brinckerhoff ) Student Design Competition, held by the Environmental and Water Resources Institute (EWRI) of the American Society of Civil Engineers. The team also included the former students' advisors, Dr. Ryan Fries, SIUE assistant professor of civil engineering and graduate program director; and Dr. Jianpeng Zhou, SIUE chair and associate professor, department of civil engineering.

St. Louis is one of about 800 cities nationwide affected by sewer overflow related water pollution. The Environmental Protection Agency has made it illegal for such overflows, which it estimates occur more than 40,000 times a year, Coombs said.

MSD has a long range plan to eliminate the overflows in 23 years at a cost of $4.7 billion, Albrecht said.

The women prepared a control sewer overflow plan for 19 homes in one St. Louis County neighborhood, with the help of MSD project engineer, Bob Miller, according to Eichhorst, who plans to design storm water infrastructure when she finishes her Master of Science in civil engineering. The students chose to use various green infrastructures, namely planter boxes, a bioretention basin or rain barrels to reduce water flow from entering the storm system. Then the women decided on the most economical and feasible choice of connecting 100-gallon rain barrels to downspouts to funnel storm water, thereby, reducing the flow entering the sewer, Eichhorst added. The total cost is $521,000.

"The strength of this project is that they went beyond the technical solution," Zhou said. "They added the approach of using green infrastructure, which is a new concept. And our team only had one semester to work on their project, while the other teams had a year."




Lincoln Traveling Exhibition Comes To Lovejoy Library

19 June 2012, 3:18 pm

"Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War," a traveling exhibition opening at the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Lovejoy Library on Wednesday June 20, 2012, examines how President Abraham Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the Civil War-the secession of Southern states, slavery and wartime civil liberties.

Lincoln is widely acknowledged as one of America's greatest presidents, but his historical reputation is contested. Was he a calculating politician willing to accommodate slavery, or a principled leader justly celebrated as the Great Emancipator? This exhibition provides no easy answers. Rather, it encourages visitors to form a nuanced view of Lincoln by engaging them with the late president's struggle to reconcile his policy preferences with basic American ideals of liberty and equality. This exhibition develops a more complete understanding of Abraham Lincoln as president, and the Civil War as the nation's gravest constitutional crisis.

Abraham Lincoln was elected President of the United States in 1860, at a time when the nation was on the brink of war. Lincoln struggled to resolve the basic questions that divided Americans at the most perilous moment in the nation's history: Was the United States truly one nation, or was it a confederacy of sovereign and separate states? How could a country founded on the belief that "all men are created equal" tolerate slavery? In a national crisis, would civil liberties be secure? Lincoln used the Constitution to confront these three crises of war, ultimately reinventing the Constitution and the promise of American life.

"We are delighted to have been selected as a site for this exhibition," Dean of Library and Information Services Regina McBride said. As a new president, Abraham Lincoln was faced with enormous challenges. This exhibition shows how Lincoln struggled with issues of secession, slavery and civil liberties-all questions our country's founding charter left unanswered. Each section of the exhibit features information about a different aspect of Lincoln's presidency. For example, the section about slavery examines the various policy options Lincoln once embraced and how his thoughts about slavery evolved over time. Most importantly, the exhibit helps visitors understand why Lincoln's struggle with the Constitution still matters today."

The National Constitution Center and the American Library Association Public Programs Office organized the traveling exhibition, which was made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH): great ideas brought to life. The traveling exhibition is based on an exhibition of the same name developed by the National Constitution Center.

SIUE's principal investigator on this grant is Caroline Pryor (capryor@siue.edu), Ph.D., an associate professor in the School of Education's department of curriculum and instruction. Julia Hansen (jhansen@siue.edu), an associate professor in Lovejoy Library, is the co-director.

The traveling exhibition is composed of informative panels featuring photographic reproductions of original documents, including a draft of Lincoln's first inaugural speech, the Emancipation Proclamation and the Thirteenth Amendment.

The Library is sponsoring free programs for the public in connection with the exhibition. On July 10, at 6:30 p.m., Dr. Louis Gerteis from the University of Missouri St. Louis, will speak on "Slaves, Servants and Soldiers: Uneven Paths to Freedom in the Border States." On July23, at 4 p.m., two members of the SIUE Department of Historical Studies, Dr. Stephen Hansen and Dr. Jason Stacy will discuss "Lincoln and the Constitutional Problem of Homeland Security."

Contact Lovejoy Library at 618-650-4636 or visit siue.edu/lovejoylibrary for more information. "Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War" will be on display at the library until August 3.




"We're In The News:" Former SIUE Faculty Member's Mission To Dress Poor Children In Haiti

19 June 2012, 9:17 am

Hundreds of poor children in Haiti, who were left devastated by an earthquake last year, are wearing dresses made by former Southern Illinois University Edwardsville faculty member Corrine Hawkins. The 83-year-old Alton woman has sewn 700 sleeveless jumpers for Haitian girls to date. Hawkins said she was moved to do so after hearing a news report about the impoverished conditions in Haiti and realized there was something she could do. A story about how Hawkins' care, commitment and craft moved her to sew and send out 50 dresses a month appears in several newspapers, including The Telegraph, the Belleville News-Democrat and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Please note more information about the seamstress' mission to Haitian girls.




NCERC'S Caupert In D.C. For Growth Energy Illinois Ethanol Fly-In

18 June 2012, 1:48 pm

The NCERC at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is promoting its strategies for "Advancing Biofuels Research" by being presenters and participants in several high-profile conferences and programs this summer.

Center Director John Caupert will visit with members of Congress tomorrow and Wednesday in Washington, D.C. as part of the Growth Energy Illinois Ethanol Fly-In. The Center research team also will participate in the following events:

• Members of the Center will attend the Department of Energy Biomass Summit on July 9-11 in Washington D.C.

• On July 12-13, Caupert will speak to the Illinois Agricultural Leaders of Tomorrow (ALOT) on "Biofuels, Policy and Technology at a Crossroads."

• Caupert will again be in Washington, D.C., the week of July 16-20 participating in meetings with the U.S. Department of Agriculture to discuss technology pathways and collaborative research on cellulosic ethanol from corn bran. While in Washington, he also will meet with leadership of the National Corn Growers Association to present recent breakthroughs in cellulosic ethanol research.

• Caupert will attend the American Coalition for Ethanol in Omaha, Neb., on Aug. 8-10.

In May, Caupert participated in the Advanced Biofuels Industry Roundtable in Washington D.C. with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Department of Energy and Department of the Navy. Previously in June, Caupert and the Center research team participated in the International Fuel Ethanol Workshop in Minneapolis.

"The vast scope of research taking place at the Center far surpasses the corn-based ethanol research for which we were first known," Caupert said. "With the addition of the new fermentation suite and our Advanced Biofuels Research Initiative, we are actively expanding into the research and development of cellulosic ethanol, advanced biofuels such as bio-butanol, specialty chemicals and other renewable compounds."

The Center's latest advanced biofuels research breakthrough took place last month when the research team successfully produced the first ethanol from the cellulosic portion of the corn kernel which led to national media attention and recognition.

"By utilizing existing technologies readily available in the commercial marketplace, the Center was able to produce a biofuel that builds upon the strengths of conventional corn ethanol and the promise of cellulosic ethanol, thus making bolt-on cellulosic ethanol a reality," Caupert said. "This translates into immediate opportunities for jobs and economic development, particularly in rural areas. But from a research perspective, this is only the beginning of an extremely exciting journey."

For more information about the Center, visit www.advancingbiofuels.org.




High School Students Enjoy Engineering Summer Camp

14 June 2012, 4:46 pm

Montra Shaw, of SIUE East St. Louis Charter High School, works on his robotics project during SIUE's School of Engineering Summer Camp

Molly McGiles, of Jacksonville (Ill.) High School, assembles her pieces for her robotics project.

Dr. Tyria Riley, of The Boeing Co., tells engineering summer camp students that they should work and study hard, but also have balance in their lives.

At Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Engineering's summer camp, Montra Shaw was paired with other high school students who imagined they were all South Africans who spoke different languages.

"I learned that in order to be a good engineer, you have to be willing to work together and get help when you need it," said the 18-year-old, who is a senior at the SIUE East St. Louis Charter High School.

Fifteen-year-old Molly McGiles discovered that an aspect of engineering involved doing something she loved. "In class, we put different sound waves together to make different sounds," said the Jacksonville (Ill.) High School junior. "This is part of electrical computer engineering. I love working on computers. I thought that electrical engineering was just dealing with a bunch of wires."

Montra and Molly were two of 25 high school students who attended this week's SIUE Engineering Summer Camp. Each year, the School of Engineering holds week-long summer camps. The two sessions, which are identical, consist of 25 high school students each. The camps are designed to introduce students to the various aspects and areas of engineering, computer science and construction, said Dr. Chris Gordon, assistant professor and chair of the Department of Construction in the School of Engineering. About 10-15 engineering faculty work with high school students in each session.

The camps were action-oriented and involved the students in many hands-on activities, Gordon said. Some of the projects included designing and programming a video game and building robots, bridges and miniature hovercars. The high school students also had an opportunity to experience college life by staying in dorms and enjoying different kinds of campus recreation.

The week's schedule of events also included a talk by Dr. Tyria Riley, a 2002 SIUE graduate with a bachelor of science in electrical engineering. Riley also has a master of science in systems engineering and a doctorate of engineering management, both from the Missouri University of Science and Technology at Rolla. Riley works for The Boeing Co. and was hired as an electrical installer to do work on F-18 military aircraft being built for the U.S. Navy. Later, Boeing selected Riley as one of four people to participate in the company's competitive two-year Engineering Skills Rotation Program. Last year Riley managed cost savings and lean projects that help save Boeing $4 million. This year, Riley is working as a resource estimator, developing labor estimates for engineering changes on the F-18 Superhornet.

Riley told the engineering camp students what helped her succeed and excel in college and business: "humility, leadership, determination, balance and strength."

"Engineering is not for everyone," said Riley, an East St. Louis native. "You have to love what you do, have a made up mind and accept the bumps and bruises along the way." Brandon Rice, a senior at the SIUE East St. Louis Charter High School, said what drives him to do the best he can is the idea of failure. "I anticipate the road blocks, so I work harder to push past them," he said.

Brandon has attended the University's Engineering Summer Camp for the past two years. He came this year to help determine if he wanted to major in bio-electrical engineering or go into architecture. The 17-year-old said he's still leaning toward engineering. Brandon was part of the SIUE East St. Louis Charter High School Botball team that placed third out of 17 teams in the 2011 Greater St. Louis Botball Regional Tournament

"Our students were bright and had great energy," said Gordon. "Engineering degrees are rigorous and require passion, dedication and planning. It's important to expose and prepare students at the high school level, which is why we hold these camps."




Students Explore Options At SIUE School of Pharmacy Diversity Camp

7 June 2012, 3:57 pm

Keith Harris, a high school student from St. Louis, recently received an award from Dr. Mark Luer, associate dean of student affairs for the SIIUE Schol of Pharmacy. Keith recently completed the SIUE School of Pharmacy Diversity Camp.

Seventeen-year-old Keith Harris plans to one day own a pharmaceutical business and sell his products worldwide. Keith moved a little closer to those aspirations when he attended Southern Illinois University Edwardsville's recent School of Pharmacy Diversity Camp.

"What interests me is the fact that there are so many fields in pharmacy and so many different things you can do," said the a senior at Lift for Life Academy in St. Louis. "And I encourage other African American and minority students to consider a career in pharmacy."

Keith was one of 19 high school seniors who recently attended the fourth annual camp. The opportunity first became available in 2009 with the purpose of increasing interest and awareness of pharmacy as a career option among minority high school students, said Dr. Lakesha Butler, clinical assistant professor in the SIUE Department of Pharmacy Practice. Requirements for the camp were at least a 3.0 grade point average and an interest in pharmacy.

"We were assessing the School of Pharmacy program and wanted to see where we were as it relates to diversity," said Butler, the camp coordinator. "It is quite evident that the School of Pharmacy is lacking when it comes to racial diversity. And the summer camp was one way we proposed to help increase diversity."

Currently, the SIUE School of Pharmacy is comprised of approximately 5 percent of "underrepresented minorities," which includes African American, Hispanics, Indian and Pacific Islanders. Asians are not included because they are not underrepresented in the health field, Butler said. The national average for underrepresented minorities in the 120 schools of pharmacy across the nation is currently 11.5 percent.

The idea to improve upon diversity in the SIUE School of Pharmacy originated from the Office of Student Affairs, but Butler said she played an instrumental part due to her research interest in health disparities and its correlation with low minority representation in pharmacy.

"It's been proven that patients feel more comfortable around those who look like them," Butler said. "Minorities will tend not to seek medical advice because they don't feel as assured that others will understand them, their diet and their health beliefs."

During the camp, students were given a broad description and a history of pharmacy. They were also told about some non-traditional careers, such as pediatric pharmacy and veterinary pharmacy. Local independent and retail pharmacies served as shadowing sites for the students to visit during one half-day of the camp. Students observed the prescription filling process from beginning to end. SIUE SOP clinical faculty led pharmacy practice labs to expose the high school seniors to hands on activities that pharmacists are involved in, such as checking blood pressure, blood glucose and cholesterol. The camp participants also learned how to prepare for pharmacy school, how to prepare for college and toured the SIUE campus. The high school seniors experienced college life by staying in a freshman college dorm on campus throughout the duration of the camp.

Alliyah Beeks, a senior at Lutheran North Senior High School in St. Louis, is planning to major in pharmacy when she goes to college and was grateful to have participated in SIUE's pharmacy camp.

"The camp was very informational," said Alliyah, who has a 3.6 grade point average. "I learned about the program from my mother, and am glad I came."




Hundreds Viewed Venus Transit with SIUE Physics Department

7 June 2012, 1:35 pm

Hundreds of interested amateur astronomers and curiosity seekers joined The Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Department of Physics at Tuesday's observation session of the 2012 Venus Transit at Roy E. Lee Baseball Field.

SIUE Associate Professor of Physics Dr. Tom Foster and a team of six associates manned four solar telescopes from shortly after 5 p.m. until nearly 8:30 p.m. A steady stream of people could clearly see the Transit in the telescopes.

"It was a great observation session," Foster said. "Most people were awestruck. Many of them had never actually looked through a telescope before. So, to see the sun and Venus was a great first experience for them. We had several people get back in line to see the solar flares visible through one of our telescopes."

Some occasional clouds slowed the line at times, but proved to be somewhat of a blessing. "The cloud cover was nice, because it gave us a chance to catch our collective breaths and talk to folks," Foster noted. "We were a little surprised by the turnout, because I believe we probably had 500 people or more experience the Transit. We didn't take time to count - we were a little busy!"

The rare astronomical event involves the planet Venus passing between the earth and the sun producing a small, dark dot on the sun's surface. The previous Venus Transit occurred was June 8, 2004. The next time a Venus Transit occurs will be in December 2117.

The SIUE STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Center provided the visitors with NASA donated souvenir solar sunglasses.




IERC hosts its 10th annual Focus on Illinois Education Research Symposium

7 June 2012, 10:08 am

The Illinois Education Research Council at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville will host its 10th annual Focus on Illinois Education Research Symposium on June 11-12, 2012, in Tinley Park.

The IERC Symposium is an annual state education research conference that draws more than 100 participants representing 40 different entities from across the state, and includes a wide array of individuals from state education agencies, education research centers, university faculty members and education practitioners.

The conference provides a forum to present Illinois-specific education research and brings stakeholders together to discuss Illinois-relevant education policy issues. This year's Symposium offers three keynote presentations: Diane Schanzenbach, Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University; Brad Phillips, California Partnership for Achieving Student Success (Cal-PASS), and a teacher panel from Advance Illinois Educator Advisory Council and Teachers of the Illinois New Millennium Initiative.

In addition, there will be 27 paper presentations and nine poster presentations. New this year is a pre-conference presentation from the P-20 Council, Assessing Quality: Developing a Higher Education Report Card in Illinois. Those interested can still register for the event. Go to the IERC website, www.ierc.siue.edu, for program information and registration materials, or call Jennifer Barnhart, (618) 650-5117.




SIUE Environmental Resources Training Center's Director Receives Outstanding Service Award

6 June 2012, 3:40 pm

Paul Shetley, director of the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Engineering's Environmental Resources Training Center (ERTC), recently was awarded the Clarence W. Klassen Outstanding Service award at the 2012 Illinois Association of Water Pollution Control Operators (IAWPCO) banquet in Springfield.

The award is presented each year by the IAWPCO to an individual whose achievement in the wastewater field within the state best exemplifies the standards of extraordinary personal service.

"Paul has been and continues to be very supportive of our association," said John LaRocca, president of the IAWPCO. "His contribution to our industry has been outstanding."

ERTC was designated by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency as the state's center for the continuing education of personnel involved in the operation, maintenance, and management of drinking water and wastewater treatment systems.




SIUE School of Nursing Administrator to Retire

6 June 2012, 1:17 pm

After eight years as the SIUE School of Nursing assistant dean for undergraduate programs, Dr. Mary Mulcahy has announced her retirement effective June 30.

A registered nurse for 49 years and a nurse educator for 45 of those years, Mulcahy made a name for herself as an expert in curriculum development. In 2005, Mulcahy led the School of Nursing through a major curriculum change focused on students' needs.

"I think the most important foundation is curriculum," she said. "We make sure students have access to the classes they need and sufficient clinical sites. It's all about getting the students what they need."

Dr. Marcia Maurer, dean of the School of Nursing, said she values the contributions Mulcahy has provided to the School and is finding it difficult to accept that she will be leaving soon.

"Everyone is replaceable as we often hear," Maurer said. "However, in Dr. Mary Mulcahy, the School of Nursing truly has a one of a kind, and it would be very safe to say that she indeed is irreplaceable. Her contribution to nursing is laudatory, but her influence on nursing curriculum is immeasurable. Mary will leave a void in the School when she retires, and I personally will be losing a visionary thinker who moved the undergraduate nursing program to the excellence it now enjoys."

When Mulcahy was asked about her experiences at the School, she said the SIUE School of Nursing allowed her to do what she loved with individuals she greatly respects.

"The assignments I have been involved with at SIUE have given me the opportunity to do the three things I find most satisfying-professional nursing, curriculum development and teaching," she said. "I have a special appreciation for the staff in the School of Nursing. Everyone makes major contributions to assist the students and to give them a positive and enlightening educational experience."




NCERC Research Team Presents at International Fuel Ethanol Workshop

4 June 2012, 4:49 pm

The NCERC at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville will be promoting its strategies for "Advancing Biofuels Research" by being presenters and participants in several high-profile conferences and programs this summer.

Center Director John Caupert and the Center research team begin a summer tour today through Thursday by participating in the International Fuel Ethanol Workshop in Minneapolis with four presentations and as an exhibitor. The Center research team also will participate in the following events:

• Caupert will visit with members of Congress on June 19-20 in Washington, D.C. as part of the Growth Energy Illinois Ethanol Fly-In.

• Members of the Center will attend the Department of Energy Biomass Summit on July 9-11 in Washington D.C.

• On July 12-13, Caupert will speak to the Illinois Agricultural Leaders of Tomorrow (ALOT) on "Biofuels, Policy and Technology at a Crossroads."

• Caupert will be in Washington, D.C., the week of July 16-20 participating in meetings with the U.S. Department of Agriculture to discuss technology pathways and collaborative research on cellulosic ethanol from corn bran. While in Washington, he also will meet with leadership of the National Corn Growers Association to present recent breakthroughs in cellulosic ethanol research.

In May, Caupert participated in the Advanced Biofuels Industry Roundtable in Washington D.C. with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Department of Energy and Department of the Navy.

"The vast scope of research taking place at the Center far surpasses the corn-based ethanol research for which we were first known," Caupert said. "With the addition of the new fermentation suite and our Advanced Biofuels Research Initiative, we are actively expanding into the research and development of cellulosic ethanol, advanced biofuels such as bio-butanol, specialty chemicals and other renewable compounds."

The Center's latest advanced biofuels research breakthrough took place last month when the research team successfully produced the first ethanol from the cellulosic portion of the corn kernel which led to national media attention and recognition.

"By utilizing existing technologies readily available in the commercial marketplace, the Center was able to produce a biofuel that builds upon the strengths of conventional corn ethanol and the promise of cellulosic ethanol, thus making bolt-on cellulosic ethanol a reality," Caupert said. "This translates into immediate opportunities for jobs and economic development, particularly in rural areas. But from a research perspective, this is only the beginning of an extremely exciting journey."

For more information about the Center, visit www.advancingbiofuels.org.




SIUE 3rd Annual Xfest Premieres June 6-9

4 June 2012, 11:53 am

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville's Department of Theater and Dance and Arts and Issues will celebrate the third festival of experimental, diverse theater performances and workshops Wednesday-Saturday.

From puppets to dance and drama to comedy, the festival is filled with something for everyone. Conceived in 2009 by Peter Cocuzza, department chair, and Chuck Harper, both associate professors of theater and dance, Xfest invites artists and theater companies from around the nation to the SIUE campus for four days of performances and workshops in order to share the world of non-traditional theater styles with fans of the performing arts. Xfest 3.0 is expected to be more diverse than ever with opportunities for theater companies to premiere alternative theater pieces in the Midwest. Some theater companies debuting include those from New York City and Portland, Ore.

"Hopefully this is a small first step to a bigger, more extensive festival in the future where students and professionals can interact with each other by creating and developing original work via the medium of experimental theatre," said Cocuzza, the festival's executive producer.

Beginning at 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, SIUE's Arts & Issues, in conjunction with Xfest 3.0, will present a world premiere from Squonk Opera. Creators of a unique brand of avant-garde theater, Squonk Opera, give birth to Edwardsville: The Opera created especially for the 2012 festival.

The festival continues at 6 p.m. Thursday, with a welcome reception followed by a performance of Violators will be Violated (not recommended for children) at 7:30 p.m. A unique, unconventional, nearly wordless theater experience that has more destruction, mayhem, murder, ambition and special effects than an action film, but it's only one guy, relying solely on the physical story-telling of an elastic, adorable and weirdly hilarious performer. The production will be followed by a talk back session with performer Casey Smith. Smith's Violators Will Be Violated is the winner of the 2009 Los Angeles Weekly Award for Best Solo Performance and Top Ten Shows of 2009.

On Friday, the festival begins at noon with a puppet workshop presented by Luis Tentindo and Company. The workshops continue with a 2:30 p.m. master class with Casey Smith and members of the performing troupe, Circle X. Then, at 5 p.m., Keynote speaker, Mark Valdez and other artistic directors, will offer a perspective of creating art titled, "One on One." Later, the production, Grim and Fischer by the Wonderheads begins at 7:30 p.m., followed by a talk back session with the cast at 9 p.m.

The festival concludes Saturday from noon-3 p.m. the Wonderheads holding a mask workshop. Afterwards, there will be several original short works presented by Theater 310b, a loosely affiliated ensemble of SIUE Department of Theater and Dance faculty, alumni, students and colleagues. Theater 310b premieres X-hibitions at 3:30 p.m. and SIUE's Chuck Harper will lead a talk back/panel discussion, "Creating New Works" from 5:30-6:30 p.m.

Then at 7:30 p.m., Mark Valdez will give the keynote speech, "The Artist as Creator." Immediately following will be the performance of Will You Still Be You? by the Luis Tentindo's Puppet Theater. Luis Tentindo is a Brooklyn-based puppeteer/multi-media artist. He creates unique puppet/object theater works. From 1994 to 2008 Tentindo danced in several New York-based contemporary dance companies, touring and teaching nationally and internationally.

Shows and workshops will be presented in the Metcalf Theater and Dunham Hall Theater on the campus of SIUE. Ticket prices vary from individual performances from $12 to $25, to single day or festival packages. Group or college student discount packages for the entire festival are $30 to $60. For more information, call the SIUE Fine Arts Box Office at 618-650-2774 or toll free at 888-328-5168, ext. 2774. Or visit www.siue.edu/xfest, www.siue.edu/artsandsciences/theater or www.siue.edu/artsandsciences/arts&issues.




View Venus Transit with SIUE Department of Physics

4 June 2012, 9:17 am

The Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Department of Physics in the College of Arts and Sciences will host an observation session of the 2012 Venus Transit beginning at 5:05 p.m. Tuesday, June 5, at Roy E. Lee Baseball Field on New Poag Road. The event will continue until sundown.

This rare astronomical event involves the planet Venus passing between the earth and the sun producing a small, dark dot on the sun's surface. The last time a Venus transit occurred was June 8, 2004 at dawn. The next time a Venus Transit occurs will be in December 2117.

"This twice in a lifetime event is something that you don't want to miss," said SIUE Associate Professor of Physics Tom Foster, Ph.D. "We will view the transit through our solar telescopes, but understand that once the sun sets behind the tree line, the show is over!"

The event is open to the public and parking is readily available at the baseball facility. Please note that because the sun is involved, the transit is not safe to observe without special equipment.




SIUE Student Wins Prestigious Gilman Scholarship

1 June 2012, 2:48 pm

Thanks to a prestigious Benjamin A. Gilman award, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville student Alexandra "Allie" White is studying in Buenos Aires for eight weeks this summer.

White, a 20-year-old junior who is majoring in Spanish, first heard about the awards program through Julie Beall-Marshall. Inspired by her sister, Hannah White, a Germany education major who traveled to Germany through SIUE's Study Abroad program, White investigated opportunities to find her own personal fit. White had visited her sister, and said she was hooked on the idea of studying abroad.

"I visited her for 10 days and thought this could be a really good opportunity for me, especially in Spanish," White said. "I've never been away from home for terribly long. I wanted to be somewhere long enough to enjoy the experience and immerse myself in the culture. Buenos Aires is a big city, and there will be so much to do."

The Hillsboro native said international business is a consideration for her future career, "I want to interact with people in the Spanish department and see where it goes. I'm pretty much open to anything."

White welcomes the opportunity to learn, think and communicate completely in Spanish during her trip and will earn 12 hours of credit for her international experience. She received $2,500 as part of the Gilman award.

White will share her experience with others upon her return as part of the Follow On Service project. A portion of her acceptance into the program was based on the development of a service project and essay. She decided to set up a station during a fall information program on campus known as the SIUE Study Abroad Fair and allow students to submit anonymous questions regarding concerns they have about traveling abroad. White plans to address individuals' thoughts and concerns, and hopefully alleviate their fears.

For more information about SIUE's study abroad program, visit siue.edu/studyabroad. More information about the Gilman award is available at iie.org/en/Programs/Gilman-Scholarship-Program.




SIUE Announces Participation In Summer Food Program

1 June 2012, 9:55 am

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville announced today it is participating in the Summer Food Service Program. Meals will be provided free of charge to children under 18 years of age only enrolled in the SIUE East St. Louis Center Summer Program. Meals also will be provided to those over the age of 18, who are enrolled in a state-approved educational program and who have mental or physical disabilities.

Acceptance and participation requirements for the program and all activities are the same for all without regard to race, color, sex, age, disability, or national origin.

Any person who believes that he or she has been discriminated against in any USDA-related activity should write to: USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410, or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TTY). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Meals will be provided at the site(s) listed below beginning June 18, 2012, and ending July 20, 2012.

(LISTING OF SITES)

SIUE Morris University Center

University Drive

Edwardsville, IL 62026-0001

Meals will be provided at the site(s) listed below beginning June 18, 2012, and ending July 26, 2012. For further information contact DaWanda Gresham, (618) 482-6909.

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SIUE East St. Louis Higher Education Campus

601 James R. Thompson Blvd.

East St. Louis, IL 62201