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IERC



Current Projects

Charter School Study

This study is supported by a grant from The Joyce Foundation
Funded April 2013-March 2015

Bradford R. White

This two-year study focuses on human resources management policies and practices in Illinois charter schools in order to learn more about the extent and consequences of these actions and help address gaps in the research literature. It is our hope that these analyses yield findings that can help guide personnel policies in both the charter and traditional public school sectors, where appropriate, as well as demonstrate the degree to which Illinois charter schools leverage the flexibility allowed by the state's charter law to drive more strategic management of their human capital.

Simple Strategies to Accelerate Children's Early Grammatical Growth

This study is supported by an NIH Subaward from Pamela Hadley and Matthew Rispoli, Applied Psycholinguistics Lab, University of Illinois
Funded March 2013-February 2014

Janet K. Holt

In this project, Janet Holt is continuing her long-time collaboration with Pamela Hadley and Matt Rispoli and their Applied Psycholinguistics Lab at University of Illinois in evaluating the effectiveness of a new psycholinguistically-motivated language modeling strategy through a parent education intervention, referred to as "toy talk". Parent input and children's grammatical growth will be compared to an existing no-treatment control group using propensity score analysis to match groups. Multilevel growth modeling will be used to determine if faster grammatical growth occurs in children with parents in the toy talk intervention group. This project builds on the success of our prior collaboration in modeling grammatical growth in children under three years.

PERA Research Based Study

This study is supported by a grant from Westat
Funded January 2013-December 2015

Bradford R. White

IERC is a subcontractor on Westat's federally-funded study of Illinois' Performance Evaluation Reform Act (PERA). In this role, IERC will assist in study design, provide technical assistance on state context and extant ISBE data, and contribute to preparing reports and making recommendations for systems improvement. This three-year project involves the following primary tasks: assessing the reliability and validity of educator practice ratings and student growth measures; examining evaluation systems' operations and effects on educators; establishing evaluation systems' contributions to student performance; preparing recommendations for compliance monitoring and system improvement; and assisting ISBE and the Performance Evaluation Advisory Council (PEAC) to incorporate these recommendations.

Developing Data System

This study is supported by a grant from the Gates Foundation through the University of Illinois
Funded December 2012-February 2014

Eric J. Lichtenberger

This project includes providing technical consultation and support for the development of a data dictionary and data templates for state systems implementing the Lumina Foundation's Credit When It is Due initiative. IERC researchers will be involved as consultants to the University of Illinois' Office of Community College Research and Leadership research team in terms of identifying relevant literature, defining key terms and measures, and developing research questions and methods. A description of the overall project can be found at http://occrl.illinois.edu/projects/cwid/

Reverse Transfer Students: Reasons for Transferring - In Their Own Words

This study is supported by SIUE Seed Grants for Transitional and Exploratory Projects (STEP)
Funded July 2012-December 2013

Eric J. Lichtenberger and Brenda Klostermann

Over the past several years IERC has developed a longitudinal database for the purpose of answering research questions related to postsecondary enrollment and student mobility. This project allows the IERC to track student enrollment across institutions, regardless of sector or location which is necessary in studying reverse transfer students. This study will extend our previous research by focusing on information specific to a student's internal (academic performance at college) and family contexts (first generation status, need for financial aid). In addition, the IERC will conduct interviews with SIUE students who reverse transferred to Lewis and Clark Community College to hear in their own words their reasons for reverse transferring.

Seeking Excellence and Diversity: How Stages in the Pipeline From High School to K-12 Teaching Affects the New Teacher

This study is supported by a grant from Spencer Foundation.
Funded January 2012-September 2013

Eric J. Lichtenberger and Bradford R. White, with Karen J. DeAngelis (University of Rochester)

This project will examine how stages in the pipeline from high school through college and initial teacher certification affect the composition of new entrants to K-12 public school teaching in Illinois. Of particular interest are the academic skills and racial/ethnic diversity of the teaching force, two characteristics of teachers that continue to be of national and local concern. In a previous but unrelated study of new teacher cohorts in Illinois, the IERC discovered an overall increase in the mean ACT composite score, but an overall decline in the percentage of minority (i.e., non-white) teachers between 1997 and 2006. The changes in Chicago were particularly striking, with new teachers' mean ACT score increasing by over 11% and the proportion of minority teachers declining by over 30% during that timeframe. It appears from those results that recent improvements in new teachers' academic skills have come at the expense of diversifying the teaching force. Using a unique, longitudinal state database, the IERC aims to gain a better understanding of how each stage in this important source of teacher supply influences the characteristics of those who enter the profession.

Maximizing Mentor Effectiveness in Increasing Student Interest and Success in STEM

This study is supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF-ITEST).
Funded August 2011 - June 2014

Bradford R. White and Jennifer Barnhart

The IERC is assisting SIUE Computer Science (Gary Mayer, Principal Investigator) in a study to delineate the effective components of mentoring for under-represented and non-under-represented students in STEM, utilizing a robotics educational program. This study builds on a previous NSF grant to SIUE Computer Science in which they showed students who perceived their mentors to be more effective had a significant increase in their interest in STEM areas and careers. The IERC will assist with database development, online survey collection, and data analysis.

Illinois P-20 Council

Working collaboratively with the Illinois State Board of Education, the Illinois Board of Higher Education, the Illinois Community College Board, and the Governor's Office, the Illinois Education Research Council will serve as the research arm of the Illinois P-20 Council. The IERC was named in the legislation that created the P-20 Council to "provide research and coordinate research collection activities for the Illinois P-20 Council."

Illinois Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 2003

Eric J. Lichtenberger

This longitudinal study uses methods similar to the High School Class of 2002 cohort study with the goal of understanding students' transitions from high school to college and their persistence towards postsecondary degree completion over time. A dataset containing ACT scores and background information for the High School Class of 2003 in Illinois has been merged with higher education enrollment information from the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC). In addition, employment data from Illinois Department of Employment Security (IDES) has been merged with these data. Together, these data allow us to follow the High School Class of 2003 into college and/or into the workplace. The time horizon for the study is seven years or through the 2009-2010 academic year. We will analyze patterns of enrollment and completion and examine the influence of students' high school environments, locale of upbringing, and family backgrounds on these patterns.

Current studies:

  1. Factors and Educational Outcomes Associated with Concurrent Enrollment in Illinois: Research study examining factors and educational outcomes associated with concurrent enrollment in Illinois, utilizing data from the IERC Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 2003. Working in collaboration with IBHE. Eric Lichtenberger.
  2. Out-migration for IL High School Class of 2003: Research study examining out-migration, utilizing data from the IERC Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 2003. Eric Lichtenberger and Adam Manley (Western Michigan University).

Completed Reports

IERC Report: A Longitudinal Study of Illinois High School Class of 2002: A Six-Year Analysis of Postsecondary Enrollment and Completion (2010-3). David Smalley, Eric Lichtenberger, and Kathleen Brown
IERC Report: A Longitudinal Study of Illinois School Graduates with Disabilities: A Six-Year Analysis of Postsecondary Enrollment and Completion (2010). Eric Lichtenberger
IERC Report: Reverse Transfer Students and Postsecondary Outcomes (2011). Eric Lichtenberger
IERC Report: College Readiness and the Postsecondary Outcomes of Illinois High School Students (2012). Eric Lichtenberger and Cecile Dietrich
IERC Report: College Confidence: How Sure High School Students Are of Their Future Majors (2012). Eric Lichtenberger and Casey George-Jackson

Illinois Longitudinal Study of the High school Class of 2002

Eric J. Lichtenberger

The goal of this longitudinal project is to understand minority and low-income students' transitions from high school to college and their persistence over time. A dataset containing ACT scores and background information for the cohort of 2002 high school graduates in Illinois has been merged with 2002-2003 higher education enrollment information from the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC). Together, these data allow us to follow the 2002 class of Illinois public high school graduates into college. We will compare patterns of enrollment for different student groups (e.g., low-income, minority) and examine the influence of students' high school environments, locale of upbringing and family backgrounds on these patterns. (A Higher Education Cooperative Act was awarded by the IBHE for 2003/2005). We plan to follow the cohort for six years, i.e., through the 2007-08 academic year. Reports produced from the data include:

IERC Report: The Demographics and Academics of College Readiness in Illinois (2005)
IERC Report: The Demographics and Academics of College Going in Illinois (2006)
IERC Report: Following the Illinois High School Class of 2002: The Three Years into College (2006-5)
IERC Report: The Illinois Class of 2002 - An Overview: A Descriptive Summary Four Years After High School (2009-1)


Completed Projects

Evaluation of High School to College Success Report and Follow-up Professional Development Workshop

This study is supported by a grant from the Illinois Board of Higher Education
Funded May 2012-July 2013

Brenda K. Klostermann

The IERC conducted a formative evaluation of the new High School to College Success Report. Focus groups and online surveys with secondary and postsecondary stakeholders identified uses and effectiveness of the new report and examined dissemination strategies for the report. In addition, information related to cross-institution collaboration and suggestions for other metrics were gathered. IERC subcontracted with Applied Research Consultants (ARC) from SIUC to assist with data collection, analysis, and report writing.

Developing Indicators of Progress toward a College Degree

This study is supported by a sub-grant from the federally funded Illinois Longitudinal Data System project
Funded March 1-June 24, 2013

Janet Holt, Bradford White, and Eric Lichtenberger

This study utilized ILDS-type data to track students across types and levels of postsecondary institutions and developed indicators of progress toward a college degree. To that end, we proposed to explore three key stages of indicator development: availability, continuity, and modeling. By combining institutional data from one public and one private four-year Illinois institution with non-institutional data, we identified various enrollment and persistence patterns in postsecondary education over three to four years following high school graduation and determined how those patterns were associated with student characteristics, academic preparation, and employment status during that time period. We also proposed to develop and test alternative indicators of student success using the newly available longitudinal data. This project determined the feasibility and predictive validity of potential indicators of student progress such as: high school academic experiences in math and other key subjects, employment during college enrollment, remedial and other cross-institutional course-taking patterns, and grades and credits earned across multiple postsecondary institutions.

Comparing the Outcomes of Native and Community College Transfer Students

This study is supported by a sub-grant from the federally funded Illinois Longitudinal Data System project
Funded March 2012-March 2013

Eric J. Lichtenberger

In collaboration with a public and private four-year institution, the IERC examined the degree completion and workforce outcomes of students who initially enrolled at the collaborating institutions as well as the students who transfer to those same four-year colleges after enrolling at a community college. The study provided an opportunity to evaluate the use of data from multiple sources and to demonstrate the benefits of utilizing information from the higher education component of Illinois' longitudinal data system (HEC) to address systemic educational issues that span the latter portion of the P-20 spectrum.

Examine District's Implementation of Teacher Effectiveness Evaluations Systems

This study is supported by a grant from the University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research
Funded February 2012-October 2012

Bradford R. White

In collaboration with The University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research (CCSR), the IERC conducted a study on teacher evaluations systems in Illinois. All school districts in Illinois must gear up to meet the requirements of Illinois' new Performance Evaluation Reform Act (PERA). The purpose of the study was to document the development and implementation process used by six districts that are at the forefront of evidence-based teacher evaluation efforts. Key experiences, ideas, and lessons learned gathered through telephone interviews and onsite visits were compiled and summarized. This information will be extremely valuable for practitioners across the state developing their own evaluations systems, as well as policy-makers supporting these efforts.

Studies of the Illinois Charter School Workforce

This study was supported by SIUE Seed Grants for Transitional and Exploratory Projects (STEP)
Funded July 2011-June 2012

Bradford R. White and Eric J. Lichtenberger

In exchange for increased accountability, charter schools are granted freedom from numerous state and local reporting requirements. As a result, charter schools are often omitted from large-scale, longitudinal research studies that rely on administrative databases maintained by the state. To address this gap in the literature, the IERC collected data on the characteristics and work experiences of charter school teachers and principals. The data was then integrate with existing IERC databases of educators in traditional public schools. This allowed the IERC to perform subsequent analyses that provided valuable insight into the organization of charter schools and a more comprehensive depiction of the Illinois public school workforce. This work is important because charter schools are often touted as being more innovative and flexible than traditional public schools, but little is known about their actual practices with regards to the management of human resources and even less is known about the impact of those practices on student achievement.

Examining Completion and Attrition in STEM Master's Programs

This study was funded by a grant from the Council of Graduate Schools
Funded July 2011-June 2012

Brenda Klostermann and Jennifer Barnhart

The IERC assisted the SIUE Graduate School in a study to examine completion and attrition in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) master's programs at SIUE. This was part of a larger study funded by the Council of Graduate Schools with four other institutions: Loyola University Chicago, Purdue University, Texas A&M University, and Wright State University. The awardees collected data on completion and attrition in STEM master's degree programs, administer surveys to students, graduates, and those who did not complete their degrees, and conducted student focus groups. Additionally, awardees surveyed graduate program directors. All of the data collected allow stakeholders to better understand reasons for enrollment, factors that contribute to student success, and promising practices to improve completion. Insight gained from these activities can help ensure that U.S. graduate schools are preparing the necessary talent at the master's level in STEM fields to meet the challenges of the 21st century.

Who is Leading Illinois Schools? A Comprehensive Analysis of the State's Principals

This study was supported with a grant from the The Joyce Foundation
Funded May 2009-April 2011

Bradford R. White

The Illinois Education Research Council received a grant to conduct a comprehensive four-part study of principals in Illinois. The research focused on the academic backgrounds and career paths of principals in Illinois public schools; estimates of principal effects, and the characteristics associated with successful school leaders in various school contexts; the roles that principals play in managing teacher talent and improving teacher quality; and school administrators' attrition and retention patterns.

IERC Report: The State of Leadership: Public School Principals in Illinis (2010-2)
IERC Report: Principal Turnover in Illinois Public Schools, 2001-2008 (2011-1)
IERC Report: The View from the Principal's Office: Results from the IERC Principals Survey (2011-2)
IERC Report: Principal Effects in Illinois: A Research Brief (2011-3)
IERC Report: The Principal Report: The State of School Leadership in Illinois (2011-4)

University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Induction and Mentoring Pilot Programs

This study was supported with a grant from the Illinois State Board of Education
Funded December 2008-March 2010

Kathleen Sullivan Brown and Brenda K. Klostermann

The primary purpose of this project was to conduct an evaluation of the beginning teacher induction programs that have been developed and applied in various school districts. The work focused on documenting processes, activities, relationships and outcomes, and supplemented the information collected by INTC on "Common Data Elements." The IERC focused on issues related to administrator involvement with the induction programs.

Study of Teacher Induction in the Midwest - Phase 2

This study was supported with a grant from The Joyce Foundation
Funded April 2008-March 2010

Brenda K. Klostermann

SRI International and the Illinois Education Research Council engaged in a research study of the induction efforts in Illinois and Ohio. The first report from the study described the induction policies in each state, identified overarching factors affecting the design and implementation of induction programs, and presented policies and practices most likely to raise the quality of induction programs. (Click here for a copy of the report: ). The second phase of the study explored the relationships between various inputs--the induction and mentoring supports provided to teachers, teachers' backgrounds, and the contexts in which they are working--and various teacher outcomes--teachers' reported professional growth, efficacy, and retention.

SRI Initial Report: http://policyweb.sri.com/cep/publications/JoyceTeacherInduction2008.pdf
SRI Final Report: Examining the Efforts of New Teacher Induction (April 2010)

Chicago Early Childhood Teacher Preparation Pipeline Study

This study was supported with grants from The Joyce Foundation and the McCormick Foundation
Funded August 2007-December 2009

Brenda K. Klostermann

After completing a two-year study of the supply of and demand for early childhood teachers in Illinois (which included new certificants from higher education and the reserve pool of already-certified teachers), it was found that, in general, the reserve pool could be expected to meet the increased demand if salaries reflected the training and professional experience of the teachers. It was also found, however, that the reserve pool was much less robust for the city of Chicago, so that it will need to rely more heavily on the certificant pipeline. But it was also found that there appears to be large leakages in this higher education pipeline--especially from the 'interest' to 'program enrollment' stages of institutional enrollment.

The purpose of this project was to examine and better understand conditions related to this "leakage" using a two-pronged approach:

  1. Due to differences in institutions' reporting of enrollment and graduation data, the IERC contracted with institutional research offices to more thoroughly analyze the institutions' enrollment and one-year persistence data for their Fall 2006 early childhood education students.
  2. Given that many students who started in Chicago institutions of higher education were quite unready for college, the IERC examined if it was these conditions that prevented students from progressing through the pipeline, and/or conditions of the program designs themselves that prevented completion, or students' personal circumstances that impeded their progress.

IERC Report: Examining the Chicago Early Childhood Teacher Pipeline (2010-1)

Assessing Change in Access to Teacher Quality in Illinois

This study was supported by a grant from The Joyce Foundation
Funded December 2006-June 2008

Jennifer B. Presley, Bradford R. White, and Karen J. DeAngelis

In 2005, the Illinois Education Research Council published the results of its work on the distribution of teacher quality. The IERC constructed a Teacher Quality Index that allowed us to examine differences in the cadre of teachers who were in schools with different student characteristics. The work also provided a useful comparison between similar schools in different parts of the state, including Chicago. Those results were based on 140,000 teachers in Illinois public schools in 2002-2003. In this follow-up project we updated the Teacher Quality Index for teachers in the Illinois Public Schools in 2005-2006.

In this follow-up project, we replicated the Teacher Quality Index using the most recent data available for teachers - those who were working in the Illinois Public Schools in 2005-2006. Adding this longitudinal element to our TQI work had several advantages:

  • We were able to see whether average teacher quality had increased (or decreased) in three years, and the types and locations of schools where such increases (or decreases) occurred.
  • The analysis provided an empirical measure to assess changes in Illinois students' access to teacher quality from 2002-2003 to 2005-2006, and to identify the types and locations of schools where these changes occurred.
  • We were able to examine changes in school performance in relation to the baseline teacher quality index and changes in the teacher quality index.

Teacher Quality & Essential School Supports: Untangling Their Interrelationship for School Improvement

This study was supported with a grant from the Spencer Foundation
Funded April 2007-March 2008

Karen J. DeAngelis and Jennifer B. Presley with Stephen Ponisciak from the Consortium on Chicago School Research

The Illinois Education Research Council (IERC) partnered with the Consortium on Chicago School Research (CCSR) at the University of Chicago to conduct a study that brings together two strands of research - one on teacher quality, the other on school environment/effectiveness - to determine if and how these characteristics of schools relate to each other and to student achievement. For this project, the CCSR generously agreed to share with the Illinois Education Research Council (IERC) their school-level indicators of Essential Supports created from their Spring 2003 teacher and administrator surveys. We combined their five Essential Supports indicators with the IERC's 2002-03 school Teacher Quality Index (TQI) for an analysis of the relationship among TQI, Essential Supports, and student achievement in the Chicago Public Schools. More specifically, the following research question was addressed: What is the relationship between school teacher quality and school environment and what, in turn, is the relative importance of each for student performance? With only one year of TQI and Essential Supports data, we were not able to untangle the direction of any relationship between teachers' academic qualifications and schools' environments. Nonetheless, the results from this initial study added a new dimension to existing research on school effectiveness and suggest a subsequent longitudinal analysis may be warranted.

Study of Teacher Induction in the Midwest

This study was supported by a grant from The Joyce Foundation
Funded January 2006-December 2007

Brenda K. Klostermann and Jennifer B. Presley

The IERC joined with SRI International and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to conduct a research study to understand that types of induction support provided to new teachers in Illinois and Ohio, and to tease out those program characteristics that impact teacher retention, teacher practices, and student achievement. State policy contexts in which the induction programs operate were also examined. A multi-method research design including analysis of existing state-level databases, interviews with state-level personnel, and case studies with 11 districts were utilized. Interviews with district personnel, focus groups with new teachers and mentors, and classroom observations informed our analyses. An in-depth focus on a subset of districts also analyzed teacher retention rates and student achievement data. The research findings will inform policy-makers and could help program developers focus their resources on program elements that are tied most closely to desired outcomes.

Planning for the Chicago Early Childhood Teacher Pipeline Study

This study was supported by an IBHE Higher Education Cooperative Act grant
Funded October 2006-March 2007

Jennifer B. Presley, Brenda K. Klostermann, and Marilyn Marshall (University of Illinois)

Following the results of the "The Illinois Early Education Teacher Study," a planning group from Chicago institutions of higher education was convened to formulate the best approach to examine what barriers prevented current students in Chicago-area early childhood teacher preparation programs from proceeding to program admission and completion, as well as to much more thoroughly understand how these institutions officially report on current enrollees and graduates. Focus groups with students, program chairs, Deans' office, and institutional researchers were conducted to inform the discussions. The results of this work were instrumental in the subsequent research design for which additional funding was received from The Joyce Foundation and the McCormick Foundation. When the subsequent research project is completed (Fall 2009), we expect to be able to make recommendations regarding institutional reporting of consistent data, identify barriers to students' progress with suggested solutions, and better measure the supply of early childhood education students moving through Chicago's higher education pipeline. In addition, we will be able to identify barriers to student transfer out of the new AAT programs.

Teacher Mobility in Illinois

Karen J. DeAngelis and Jennifer B. Presley

The goal of this study was to access the extent of new teacher turnover from schools, districts, and the public school teaching profession in Illinois. Using data from the Illinois State Board of Education's Teacher Service Record (TSR) and Teacher Certification Information System (TCIS) databases for the period 1986/87 through 2005/06, we tracked several cohorts of full-time teachers for five years following their initial entry into teaching to account for their movements, including reentry to the Illinois Public Schools, over time. Differences in turnover rates by teachers' personal characteristics, such as gender, race/ethnicity, age at entry, and ACT scores, and by school characteristics, such as locale, percent low-income students, and percent minority students, were examined. The findings from this study have contributed to policy discussions concerning teacher personnel practices in Illinois.

IERC Report: Leaving Schools or Leaving the Profession: Setting Illinois' Record Straight on New Teacher Attrition (2007-1)

The Distribution of Teacher Characteristics in Illinois

Karen J. DeAngelis

Research from other states has shown that the quality of teachers, as measured by characteristics like certification, years of experience and quality of the undergraduate institution attended, differs significantly across school districts within a state. The purpose of this study was to examine the distribution of teacher characteristics across and within districts in Illinois. A historical file of Teacher Service Record (TSR) and Teacher Certification Information System (TCIS) data was employed.

Evaluation of a Common Vision: Teacher Quality Enhancement in the Middle Grades in Illinois

Funded September 2002 - November 2004

Brenda K. Klostermann and Jennifer B. Presley

Using a case study approach, this study evaluated the implementation and execution of the Illinois Board of Higher Education's federally funded grant, A Common Vision: Teacher Quality Enhancement in the Middle Grades in Illinois. The grant was designed to improve the preparation and recruitment of high-quality middle-grade educators through a statewide collaborative effort. Four individual sites that received funding through this grant were examined in terms of how they planned and organized in order to attain the goals of the grant, and what aspects of organizational culture and leadership behavior contributed to success. The evaluation also assessed the effectiveness of the statewide P-16 collaboration among those involved with the grant.

Funding and Enrollment in Higher Education: A Comparative Analysis

Jennifer B. Presley

This study sought to assess how well Illinois supports its higher education system compared to other states. Given that higher education is not compulsory like elementary and secondary education, the study considered the state's effort to provide higher education in two ways - first we looked at the opportunity Illinois provided within its higher education system to serve its students, and second we looked at how Illinois funds higher education.

IERC Report: Illinois Higher Education: A Comparative Analysis (2003-3)

Preparing School Principals: A National Perspective on Policy and Program Innovation

Elizabeth L. Hale and Hunter N. Moorman

This report was published jointly by the Institute for Educational Leadership (Washington, D.C.) and the IERC as part of its Issues in Education series. The report focused on two areas in which state policies and programs can have particular influence on school leadership: licensure, certification and accreditation requirements; and administrator training and professional development.

IERC Report: Preparing School Principals: A National Perspective on Policy and Program Innovations (September 2003)

Examining Leaks in the Teacher Supply Pipeline

Jennifer B. Presley with Charles E. Trott & Michael Peddle

In collaboration with the Center for Governmental Studies at Northern Illinois University, the IERC was awarded a HECA grant in August 2001 to study the following two questions: (1) What are the reasons that many newly certified teachers are not taking teaching jobs in Illinois public schools? (2) Why are teachers leaving Illinois public schools during their first five years? Two telephone surveys to a total of 1,600 have been completed.

IERC Report: Teacher Supply in Illinois: Evidence from the Illinois Teacher Study (December 2002),
IERC Report: Teacher Induction in Illinois: Evidence from the Illinois Teacher Study (IERC-2003-2)

In the Pipeline: The Early Career Paths of Administrative Certificate Holders in Illinois

Karen J. DeAngelis

This study sought to understand why so many people get Illinois administrative certification, but why so few actually became administrators. A survey of 300 randomly selected individuals from among those who received Illinois certification in the year 1999/2000 was conducted during the 2001/2002 academic year; 219 individuals agreed to participate. Respondents were asked about their motivations for pursuing administrative certification, what they thought of their programs, whether they had subsequently pursued an administrative position, and if not, why not.

IERC Report: In the Pipeline: The Early Career Paths of Administrative Certificate Holders in Illinois (2003-1)

Students' Access to Teacher Quality in Illinois

Jennifer B. Presley and Bradford R. White

The IERC worked with Illinois State University and The Education Trust on a Joyce Foundation-funded project to investigate students' access to teacher quality in three states (Illinois, Ohio, and Wisconsin) and three large, low-income, high minority school districts within those states (Chicago Public Schools, The Cleveland Municipal School District, and Milwaukee Public Schools). This work built on the Teacher Quality Index created by the IERC as part of our project, The Distribution of Teacher Characteristics in Illinois, and looked at new ways of analyzing, communicating, and utilizing these data. The project progressed in three phases:

  • Phase I: Collection and analysis of data regarding the current distribution of teacher quality attributes across the three states and districts
  • Phase II: Exploration of the internal (school and district-level) and external (state-level and higher education) factors that may contribute to the teacher distribution patterns observed in Phase I
  • Phase III: Policy recommendations for state and local action

The Illinois Early Education Teacher Study

This study was supported by a grant from the National Institute for Early Education Research with funding from the Pew Charitable Trusts
Funded March 2004-March 2006

Jennifer B. Presley and Brenda K. Klostermann

Given the critical role that teachers play in providing high-quality early learning experiences and in providing school readiness outcomes for children, concerns are mounting regarding whether Illinois' workforce can provide enough qualified early education teachers. The aim of this study was to determine the adequacy of the supply of qualified teachers for early education (3-5 years of age) programs in Illinois given recent changes in state and federal policies affecting the demand for such individuals. We reviewed existing child care and public school data and research reports on the Illinois early childhood workforce. To help understand the multiple career pathways of early childhood certificants, we surveyed a random sample of individuals not teaching in the public school system but who have received Early Childhood (Type 04) certificates to understand where those individuals were working and under what circumstances those who had left early childhood might return to the field. The findings were analyzed in the context of policy initiatives aimed at influencing the supply of qualified early childhood personnel.

IERC Report: Pipelines and pools: Meeting the Demands for Early Childhood Teachers in Illinois (2006-3)
IERC Report: The Illinois Early Childhood Teacher Reserve Pool Study (2006-4)