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Emergency Notification
Emergency Notification
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Tornado/Thunderstorms & Lighting

Civil defense sirens are sounded in the event of enemy attack or in the event of threatening weather. The City of Edwardsville and the Edwardsville Campus operate civil defense sirens. University sirens will be activated when a tornado is imminent in the area. The East St. Louis Higher Education Campus has interior storm alert sirens.

A. Tornado:

Illinois is geographically located at the northeast edge of the most tornado prone region of the world. Since 1950, an average of 25 tornadoes have touched down across the state annually. The months of April, May and June account for more than 50 percent of these tornadoes.

A tornado is a particularly dangerous severe storm with rotary winds that can exceed 300 miles-per-hour, usually accompanied by hail, severe thunderstorms and often times dangerous lightning. Flying debris may become deadly missiles that injure and kill.

Most tornadoes move from southwest to northeast and generally occur in late spring, but they can happen any time. When a tornado threatens, immediate action can SAVE LIVES.

1. Indoor Procedures:

Edwardsville (Central campus and outlying locations)

  • The tornado alert is a long, wavering, intermittent blast of sirens located both outside and within the core buildings.
  • Go immediately to safe areas as designated by "Storm Shelter" signs.
  • Assist persons with disabilities.
  • If safe areas are not posted, go immediately to the basement or to an inner hall of a lower floor. Stay away from windows and protect yourself from flying debris by seeking shelter under a sturdy table or desk and covering your face.

Remain in safe areas until instructed by University Police that all is clear. Speakers have been installed in the basements of core buildings so that the police may make announcements during the progress of the storms as well as the "all clear."

School of Dental Medicine

A. Main Clinic

  • Go immediately to safe areas as designated by "Storm Shelter" signs.
  • Assist persons with disabilities.
  • If safe areas are not posted, shelter areas will be central corridors not opening into the direction of the storm, central rooms having no exterior walls, or the side of the building away from the storm. Stay away from windows and protect yourself from flying debris by seeking shelter under a sturdy table or desk and covering your face.

B. Mini Clinics

  • Go immediately to safe areas as designated by "Storm Shelter" signs.
  • Assist persons with disabilities.
  • If safe areas are not posted, go to the dispensing areas and lie on the floor. Cover your face to protect it from flying debris.

C. Gymnasium

  • Go immediately to safe areas as designated by "Storm Shelter" signs.
  • Assist persons with disabilities.
  • If safe areas are not posted, go to the basement of the building. Protect yourself from flying debris by seeking shelter under a sturdy table or desk and covering your face.

D. Other Buildings

  • Go immediately to safe areas as designated by "Storm Shelter" signs.
  • Assist persons with disabilities.
  • If safe areas are not posted, personnel in buildings having basements must move to the basement. Personnel in buildings without basements must go to the lower floors and lie on the floors of the central corridors or rooms away from the direction of the storm. Protect yourself from flying debris by seeking shelter under a sturdy table or desk and covering your face.

Remain in safe areas until instructed by University Police that all is clear. Speakers have been installed in the basements of core buildings so that the police may make arrangements during the progress of the storm as well as the "all clear."

East St. Louis Higher Education Campus

  • Go immediately to safe areas as designated by "Storm Shelter" signs.
  • Assist persons with disabilities.
  • If instructions or safe areas are not posted, go immediately to the lower floors and lie on the floors of the central corridors or rooms away from the direction of the storm. Protect yourself from flying debris by seeking shelter under a sturdy table or desk and covering your face.

2. Outdoor Procedures:

Take cover, lie face down in the nearest ditch, culvert or ravine. This procedure is preferable to remaining in a vehicle, mobile home or lightweight structure. Remember that tornadoes move swiftly and are often erratic. Remain in safe areas until instructed that all is clear.

B. THUNDERSTORMS AND LIGHTNING:

Thunderstorms affect relatively small areas when compared with hurricanes and winter storms. The typical thunderstorm is 15 miles in diameter and lasts an average of 30 minutes.

Despite their small size, all thunderstorms are dangerous. Every thunderstorm produces lightning, which kills more people each year than tornadoes. Heavy rain from thunderstorms can lead to flash flooding. Strong winds and hail are also dangers associated with some thunderstorms.

Indoors:

  • Remain calm.
  • Avoid water fixtures, telephone lines and any electrical conducting materials, such as computer network communication cables.

Outdoors:

  • Go to the nearest ditch or ravine and lie down. In a wooded area, go to a low area of smaller trees and bushes.
  • Do not stand in an open area or underneath a tall tree or structure.
  • Stay away from metal objects and open bodies of water.
  • If you are in a motor vehicle, remain there. You are generally safe from lightning strikes since the tires act as effective electric insulators.