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School of Education, Health and Human Behavior
School of Education

Marie Klopfenstein, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

(e-mail)

Education:
Ph.D. in Applied Language and Speech Sciences, 2012, University of Louisiana at Lafayette        
M.A. in Linguistics, 2006, Wayne State University
B.A. in Linguistics, 2002, Wayne State University
B.A. in German & Anthropology, 2002 Wayne State University

Specialization:
Phonetics, Voice and Motor Speech Disorders

Phone:
(618) 650‑3492

Office:
Founders Hall, Room 1333

Marie Klopfenstein

About Dr. Klopfenstein

Dr. Klopfenstein joined the faculty of the Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology program at SIUE in 2012. She teaches undergraduate and graduate course work in phonetics, speech science, voice and motor speech disorders, and dysphagia. Dr. Klopfenstein is Secretary/Treasurer for the International Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics Association and Co-Chair of SIUE’s Safe Zone. She is a frequent presenter at professional meetings at the national and international levels.

Research Profile

Dr. Klopfenstein’s current research interests include acoustic and perceptual correlates of speech naturalness, as well as identifying the need and accessibility of voice services for the transgender community. Dr. Klopfenstein has particular research experience with acoustic analysis and frequently uses SPSS in her research. Her future research considerations include looking at the relationship between naturalness and intelligibility in speech disorders and the use of acoustically manipulated auditory feedback as facilitated by the use of apps with transgender voice services.

Publications:

Klopfenstein, M.  (Accepted).  “Relationship between acoustic measures and speech naturalness ratings in Parkinson’s disease: A within-speaker approach,” Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics.

Klopfenstein, M.  (Accepted).  Exceptions to the SSP: Evidence from Ottawa for a metatheoretical approach.  In M.J. Ball (Ed.), Sonority across languages.  Sheffield: Equinox.

Klopfenstein, M. and Ball, M.J. (2010). “An analysis of the sonority hypothesis and cluster realization in a child with phonological disorder,” Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, 24(4-5), 261-270.

Rutter, B., Klopfenstein, M., Ball, M.J., and Müller, N. (2010). “My client’s using non-English sounds! A tutorial in advanced phonetic transcription. Part III: Prosody and unattested sounds,” Contemporary Issues in Communication Science and Disorders, 37, 111-122.

Ball, M.J., Müller, N., Klopfenstein, M., and Rutter, B. (2010). “My client’s using non-English sounds! A tutorial in advanced phonetic transcription. Part II: Vowels and diacritics,” Contemporary Issues in Communication Science and Disorders, 37, 103-110.

Ball, M.J., Müller, N., Rutter, B., and Klopfenstein, M. (2009). “My client’s using non-English sounds! A tutorial in advanced phonetic transcription. Part I: Consonants,” Contemporary Issues in Communication Science and Disorders, 36, 133-141.

Ball, M. J., Müller, N., Klopfenstein, M., and Rutter, B. (2009). “The importance of narrow phonetic transcription for highly unintelligible speech: Some examples,” Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology, 34, 84-90.

Klopfenstein, M. (2009). “Interaction between prosody and intelligibility,” International Journal of Speech-Language Phonology, 11(4), 326-331.

Klopfenstein, M., Ball, M.J., and Rutter, B. (2009). “The sonority hypothesis: more evidence from onset and coda clusters in disordered speech.” In V. Marrero and I. Pineda (Eds.), Linguistics: the challenge of clinical application. Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Clinical Linguistics (pp. 41-47). Madrid, Spain: Euphonía Ediciones.

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