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Brigham Dimick

Drawing

Brigham Dimick

Drawing Area

Gallery of Brigham's work

bdimick@siue.edu

Brigham Dimick is the area head of Drawing. Dimick received his MFA in Painting from Indiana University in 1991, and his BFA in Painting from Tyler School of Art in 1985. He was awarded an Individual Artist Fellowship from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts in 2002. He is currently represented by MCS Gallery in Easton, Pennsylvania. Dimick's drawings have been shown and reviewed in the Philadelphia area for the last five years. He was a 2000 Fleisher Challenge Grant recipient, and received the Georgia Council of the Arts Artist Grant in 1995. His drawings have been collected by corporations, two museums, and by private collectors.

Education

1991 MFA in Painting, School of Fine Arts, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

1985 BFA in Painting, Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Elkins Park, PA

Honors / Awards

2010 STEP grant from the SIUE Graduate School; "Inherited Environments"

2008 Summer Research Fellowship, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville: Collaboration with Honeybees (Apis Mellifera) to Create Self-Portraits Alternatively Made From and Obscured By Honeycomb

2005 Summer Research Fellowship, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville: Self Portraits in Two and Three Dimensions Constructed by Bees, of Honeycomb

2002 Individual Artist Fellowship, Pennsylvania Council on the Arts

2001 Finalist, Pew Fellowships in the Arts (for Works on Paper)

2000 Fleisher Art Memorial Challenge Exhibition recipient (Philadelphia, PA)

1993 Individual Artist Grant, Georgia Council of the Arts

Teaching Statement

Students are given a strong training of drawing skills so that their advanced work can be explored with confidence. As students advance in their studies in drawing at SIUE, they are expected to individuate from their peers and develop their own focus. Consequently, critical response to each student's work must be framed within that student's intentions. Since formal language is inextricably linked with content, upper level students need to learn about form and technique in ways that differ substantively from their classmates. Standards are held very high for an active self-directed research process to help each student realize her or his highly individualized goals.

When students are in early stages of development, there are always gaps between their intentions and their accomplishments. Individualized communication with each student is crucial in ensuring that critical discussion is appropriately directed toward each student's intention and sensibility.

Artist Statement

An arc in one line of my creative research may have passed its zenith. This work involves an active collaboration with bees to make drawings and sculptures that are alternatively formed and deconstructed by the bees' activity. These were inspired by my own vulnerabilities to stinging insects - systemic allergic reactions - as well as the bees' own vulnerabilities due to Colony Collapse Disorder. In essence, this work points to the fragile interdependence between man and nature.

An emerging direction in my creative work has shifted the subject away from my own vulnerabilities and toward those of my children, and by extension, the natural world that they will inherit. This direction not only marks a shift of subject, but also of means. For the previous ten years, I have worked predominantly with drawing media. My most recent research explores a combination of oil painting with photography, deliberately juxtaposing the conceptual and visual characteristics of these two media.

I explore representations of my children as a means to examine the rifts between their innocent musings about the natural world and the larger environmental concerns about the same subject. By beginning with photographs of children from a bird's eye view, I create painted illusions of maps that seamlessly extend the private environments of these children into larger geographic regions. These works examine tensions between the known present and the imagined future, empirical documentation and fabrication, and no doubt my own hopes and fears.