From Awareness to Action:

Promoting Critical Thinking and Citizenship in Baccalaureate Education

 

Kathy Bushrow, Associate Professor, Curriculum and Instruction

Caroline Pryor, Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction

Dawn Reed, Academic Adviser, Academic Counseling and Advising

Natalie Kizzire, Secretary IV, Kinesiology

 

 

Abstract

The proposed Southern Illinois University Edwardsville (SIUE) General Education Program will facilitate student development toward demonstrating the Values of SIUE: Citizenship, Excellence, Integrity, Openness, and Wisdom. Our model emphasizes critical thinking and connections across the curriculum, offer consistency in standards, and recognize the holistic nature of student development. The student-centered curriculum provides a strong foundation in core competencies--which include languages, technology, quantitative reasoning, information literacy, communication and interpersonal skills, cultural and global awareness--by providing a system of related courses, which may be combined or team-taught by various disciplines.

We propose a model of citizenship and service learning that extends service learning efforts at SIUE, focusing particularly on the freshman seminar in which students will provide service across the SIUE campuses. All freshman Seminars and introductory-level courses will be structured to include a type of Service Learning project. A transfer-student seminar will introduce the service learning concept to this segment of the student body.

This proposal builds upon a core set of SIUE community values about which students can learn, debate, explore and apply in their coursework and in field settings within the university and surrounding community. These activities will encourage the students to expand their academic and service horizons to include the world, the necessity of which was presented in the webcast, Scanning the Future. To further enhance students' understanding of the importance of becoming a citizen who contributes to the world and their community, this proposal design contains several components: integrated coursework, use of university resources, and application and exploration of knowledge and talent. Example program outcomes include: (a) service (learned in events such as the freshmen seminar, or service learning projects); (b) exploration (such as a senior project related to university core values); and (c) local and global citizenship (such as community projects that investigate or promote issues of democracy and social justice).

The culmination of the Baccalaureate Program will be the Senior Assignment. Drawing upon experiences gained during general education coursework, students will design a Senior Project that integrates a community-based Service Learning Project within their major area. Such a project would encourage citizenship throughout the entire academic experience, thus promoting connections between the university and community, the major area and society, and ultimately societal roles.

Our proposal is based upon using most of the current courses; however, we propose the courses be reviewed for consistency across sections, inclusion of critical thinking activities, and academic rigor. The courses also need to demonstrate integration of technology to encourage the students to develop skills needed to be successful. Finally, we propose the courses be reviewed for ways in which to connect the courses across the curriculum.

 

Proposal

 

I. Program Description

 

The proposed Southern Illinois University Edwardsville (SIUE) General Education Program will facilitate student

development toward demonstrating the Values of SIUE: Citizenship, Excellence, Integrity, Openness, and Wisdom. Our

model will emphasize connections across the curriculum, offer consistency in standards, and recognize the holistic nature of

student development. The student-centered curriculum will provide a strong foundation in core competencies by providing a

system of related courses, which may be combined or team-taught by various disciplines to provide further connections.

Utilizing the current structure of the general education curriculum, the skills of writing, oral communication, and critical thinking will be integrated into introductory and distribution level courses. For example, the skills of English 101 are used to prepare written assignments for introductory level courses. Likewise, the skills of critical thinking gained in Philosophy 106 would be requisite to Political Science 112, American Government. Students would be able to analyze a current or proposed law in terms of its logic or fallacy. Similarly, computer skills or quantitative literacy would also be requisite skills for most general education courses. In this way, students gain an awareness of the ways in which the skills courses support and enhance content courses.

The resources of SIUE will be utilized extensively through this model. All introductory-level courses will be structured to include a type of Service Learning project. The Freshman Seminar will include, among other topics, an introduction to Service Learning/Community Service with a focus on the SIUE campuses, including the East St. Louis Center. The youth programs at the East St. Louis Center may also provide an opportunity for service and promote college attendance for young people who may not otherwise attend college. The Fine Arts courses, particularly Art, may include visits/assignments related to the University Museum. The Science courses may include the study of plant/animal life around Cougar Lake. A transfer-student will be introduced to the service learning concept in a similarly designed seminar.

The courses which comprise the General Education Curriculum are organized to promote openness to diversity and individual differences. Through the inter-group relations courses, which may be combined with writing, oral communication, or another course, students will be encouraged to experience diversity through topics discussed and coursework assigned and service learning projects proposed by students as an application in the Senior Assignment.

The culmination of the Baccalaureate Program is the Senior Assignment. Drawing upon experiences gained during general education coursework, students will design a Senior Assignment that integrates a community-based Service Learning Project with the content of their major area. Such a project would encourage service learning throughout their entire academic experience, thus promoting connections between the university and community, their major and society, and ultimately societal roles.

A. Rationale

Belief in the importance of a citizen who contributes to a democratic society remains strong in the United States (Darling-Hammond, 1994; Goodman, 1992; Ravitch, 1983). Support of this importance is based on positive attitudes towards three dimensions of democratic principles: (a) the opportunity for full social participation (Goodlad, 1996), (b) equal opportunity in a diverse society (Spring, 1999), and (c) a moral norm of justice and fairness (Gutmann, 1987). There is some evidence of the positive effect of schooling in preparing democratic citizens. For university students programs that provide coursework linked to these values can foster a “fund of democratic knowledge”-- that is, as students experience their university program they learn and work in environments where the situated use of democratic thought is evident (Parker, 1996b; Pryor, 2005).

This proposal builds upon a core set of SIUE community values about which students can learn, debate, explore and apply in their coursework and in field settings within the university and surrounding community. To further enhance students’ understanding of the importance of becoming a citizen who contributes to the world and their community, this proposal design contains several components: integrated coursework, use of university resources, and application and exploration of knowledge and talent. Example program outcomes include: (a) service (learned in events such as the freshmen seminar, or service learning projects); (b) exploration (such as a senior project related to university core values); and (c) local and global citizenship (such as community projects that investigate or promote issues of democracy and social justice).

1. Core Values

a. Citizenship
As a value of SIUE, citizenship has been defined as “social, civic and political responsibility, globally, nationally, locally, and within the University.” This proposal aims to promote “active partnerships and a climate of collaboration and cooperation among faculty, staff, students and the larger community.” This proposal connects citizenship to the general education curriculum by integrating experiences in which students work individually and in teams on projects, which demonstrate their commitment to the community and the body politic. One of the key components of an effective citizenry is the ability to work, debate, collaborate and generate ideas within a group of individuals. Therefore the general education curriculum will involve a component of teamwork. Students will graduate SIUE prepared to participate in a democratic society. Another component of citizenship is environmental stewardship, or the recognition that global resources are limited and should be used wisely. This idea will be incorporated into the academic experience through the use of resources on campus, including Cougar Lake, The Gardens, and other campus and regional areas.

b. Excellence
As defined by SIUE, excellence involves “high quality student learning, continuous improvement and innovation, outstanding scholarship and public service, and standards consonant with the premier status to which (the institution) aspires.” As such, students will demonstrate command of content knowledge and its application, both practical and theoretical, through various projects involving personal and community responsibility.

c. Integrity
Integrity as defined in the SIUE core values, is “accountability to those we serve and from whom we receive support” as well as “honesty in communications and actions.” Students will learn to be reflective and responsible for their ethical and moral behavior, to think of alternative strategies that will allow them to deal effectively with a variety of individuals and circumstances and to promote these values in the communities in which they live and work. For example, the policy of academic honesty will be learned through multiple sessions in the writing center on plagiarism. Students will learn social values and commit to understanding issues of social justice and equality in courses that regard political systems, economics or culture and education. The freshman seminar will initially present issues that will continue to be discussed in subsequent coursework.

d. Openness
The core value of openness has been described as “the inclusion of the rich diversity of humankind in all aspects of university life and respect for individual differences.” As a value, openness promotes “intellectual freedom and diversity of thought.” Most importantly, openness, as a value enhances the skills and abilities of all students, enabling them value the diversity of their peers. In an environment of openness, students feel free to express ideas, to explore new ideas, and to connect these to emerging global needs and communities. Students will be encouraged to express ideas and thoughts openly in an environment that promotes diversity and understanding through the student-centered curriculum developed by faculty trained to elicit these responses.

e. Wisdom
Wisdom is the ability to think critically and analyze content knowledge, based on a set of core values. Graduates will know, understand, and make judgments based on the core values of SIUE, in a responsible way and with a vision that contributes to the common good. A curriculum that promotes reflection and critical thinking and encourages the connectivity of content areas fosters the development of wisdom, promotes responsible citizenship in students thus is central to the ways that individuals make judgments in civic life. The curriculum will afford students opportunities to apply knowledge and gain valuable decision-making experience.

2. Service Learning

Service Learning as defined is “a teaching and learning strategy that integrates meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities” (National Service Learning Clearinghouse). The primary purpose of service learning is to promote a sense of value-based community and participatory citizenship. Service learning introduces students to opportunities connecting them to others in an ever expanding role. Critical thinking skills developed in coursework can be applied in Service Learning projects. Service learning is key to developing the skills necessary to function effectively in an interdependent society.

a. Examples in other Universities
Service learning has long been recognized by other institutions for its value in developing a sense of community and citizenship in its students. For example, University of California at Berkeley places a high value on service learning, evidenced through the resources they put into projects and corresponding research. On a national scale, Berkeley hosts the National Service-Learning and Civic Engagement Research Directory, as well as websites and national newsletters. Internationally, Berkeley supports service learning in developing countries. The University of Michigan provides several opportunities for students to participate in service learning, including national projects such as AmeriCorp and America Reads. Locally, students work with several Detroit initiatives providing a variety of services to the community such as teaching computer skills to adults and working with K-12 students in after-school programs.

b. Examples at SIUE
SIUE Kimmel Leadership Center, through the Student Leadership Development Program (SLDP), promotes service through their website, projects with several departments, and connections with the community.

One example is the Project GAME community service project with the Metro East Crisis Taskforce. During the Fall 2005 semester, the twenty-five African American male freshmen that comprise a special section of UNIV112 prepared and delivered meals each week to the homeless in the East St. Louis area. The students spent time at the beginning of the semester learning locations where homeless individuals live. The prepared meals were delivered to the homeless under bridges and abandoned buildings. The freshmen learned a great deal about the people they were serving, learning to value their opportunities for education. The project was a combined effort with the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, Campus Ministries, and Kimmel Leadership.

Another example is Action Day, which provides a series of one-day opportunities for students to get involved in service learning. Raise Your Voice helps empower students with the ability and tools to change the world by involving them in community affairs. Locally, service learning opportunities, such as volunteer fairs and voter registrations, are provided allowing students to connect with their community. Additional opportunities for service learning would expand this initial effort.

c. Proposed changes at SIUE
We propose a model of citizenship and service learning that extends service learning efforts at SIUE, focusing particularly on the freshman seminar in which students will provide service across the SIUE campuses. For example, the youth programs at the East St. Louis Center offer opportunities for service and promotion of college attendance for young people who might not other wise attend. Additionally, ample opportunities to provide tutoring, in person and online, exist in school districts surrounding the SIUE community.

All other introductory-level courses, beyond those offered as a freshman seminar, will be structured to include a type of Service Learning project. A transfer-student seminar will introduce the service learning concept to this segment of the student body.

SIUE has an abundance of resources to enrich the experiences of its students. The Fine Arts courses, particularly Art, will include visits/assignments related to the University Museum. The Science courses will include the study of plant/animal life around Cougar Lake.

In subsequent semesters or courses, the service learning component will extend beyond the main campus to include the broader community, as has been described earlier in the efforts of Project GAME.

As students move beyond the General Education, degree programs can continue the thread of service learning. The senior project would also incorporate some aspect of service learning, reflection and analysis of the project efficacy to community or world betterment.

B. Aspects of Program Descriptions
In order to affect the development of graduates who are critical thinkers and are prepared to participate as citizens in a democratic society, we propose the following program aspects:

1. Connections across the curriculum. Students often see their academic career as a series of unrelated courses. In contrast, society develops holistically. For example, one cannot effectively discuss the biology of cloning, without addressing the philosophical aspect of ethics. Likewise, it is difficult to discuss the poetry and art of the 1960s without addressing the historical/political events that occurred in that era.

To date, the freshman seminars have recognized the need to approach student learning in an interdisciplinary fashion. Some freshman seminars have combined two courses to create a new topic. Through these seminars, students learn about each discipline, as well as the interrelated nature of the concepts and how this relationship fosters a holistic social construct. (See Appendix B.)

2. Student centeredness. The content and delivery of the curriculum will enhance student development. Incoming freshmen exhibit a variety of developmental levels, with respect to academic readiness, as well as social readiness. A student centered environment is central to the applied nature of this proposal. In such an environment, students can more readily manage the challenges of university life.

Students will gain the experience of being supported during their early academic experience, then the experience of supporting others as a seasoned student. The curriculum will provide an opportunity for students to get support as underclassmen, return the service to their peers as they become upperclassmen, and lead in numerous venues at SIUE as seniors.

3. Consistency of standards. Each introductory level course will be similar in scope and requirements to every other introductory level course. For example, introductory courses in art, music, theater and philosophy should require the same level of academic rigor, i.e. similar requirements for written assignments, quizzes, exams, readings, etc.

While academic freedom is important, all sections of a particular course should cover the same content. Currently, different sections of the same introductory course may cover completely different objectives and content, based on the interests or background of the instructor.

C. Program Components
In an academic environment where students are encouraged to draw broadly and deeply across the content areas, students will complete 42-44 hours of General Education Credits (See Appendix A). This will include five skills courses, five introductory and three distribution level courses, as well as an Interdisciplinary Studies (IS) course at the junior level. The compilation of courses will reflect a balance of Fine Arts and Humanities, Social Science and Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Within the context of these courses, students will also satisfy requirements for Citizenship (CIT), Intergroup Relations (IGR), International Issues (II) or International Cultures (IC), Service Learning (SL) and Technology (TECH).

As students progress through the General Education curriculum, they will experience numerous opportunities to explore, apply, learn and reflect upon openness in topics such as diversity and individual differences. Through the inter-group relations courses, which may be combined with writing, oral communication, or another course, students will be encouraged to debate topics discussed and coursework assigned.

In a rapidly growing information age, it is critical for students to possess computer skills in order to participate effectively in a global society. Students versed in technology possess abilities that can be shared at many levels. Computer skills serve a variety of purposes both within and outside academe. Students gain enhanced educational experiences by being able to connect nationally and internationally with others. They are able to access information quickly and become innovative in research and study skills. Computer skills also support effective writing, with which one functions in a literate society. As a result of technology, many professions rely on personnel with computer skills, in addition to content knowledge, to provide the highest quality of service.

As described on page one, the culmination of the Baccalaureate Program will be the Senior Assignment, which will integrate program components (see Figure 1 in appendix).

1. Statement of Objectives

a. Analytic, Problem-Solving, and Decision-Making Skills. The rigorous foundation that provides connections across the curriculum enables students to begin to think critically about the world. Integrating two courses such as science and writing or philosophy and math/science requires students to think about the content area and to analyze the relationships that exist. Writing critically about a topic requires the ability to interpret and/or evaluate information in order to present it in an intelligible manner.

b. Oral and Written Communication Skills. The ability to communicate is a vital skill for all citizens. Effective speakers are able to persuade and motivate others to make positive changes. The ability to write successfully allows an individual to promote and express him or herself in a personal or professional arena. Integrating the courses, requiring all students to write across the curriculum, and requiring community participation through service learning, will enhance the oral and written communication skills of the students.

c. Foundation and Liberal Arts. As responsible citizens in a democracy, it is critical that all students develop a foundation of knowledge. All citizens require a basic understanding of each of the content areas in order to function well in society.

d. Value of Diversity. In a country established by people from different cultures, and whose political and social perspectives are diverse, it is important to value diversity of though and opinion. As the university continues it commitment to enhance diversity and global awareness, the curriculum should further reflect this focus. Through a service learning model, directly connected to academics, students will have the opportunity to cultivate and apply this commitment.

e. Scientific Literacy. Methods of scientific inquiry promote critical thinking and problem solving. A strong foundation in the sciences, including lab and field experiences, are invaluable in educating undergraduate students. University resources provide students with the opportunity to use the scientific inquiry methods to study the ecosystem around Cougar Lake. Environmental studies within the university provide a connection to global issues involving the environment. Another area of scientific literacy is technology. In a rapidly changing, information age, the ability to understand and use technology has become crucial for every citizen. Every student would be required to complete one course that has a technology component.

f. Ethics. Understanding and using community ethics, values, and morals is crucial to a democratic community. A sense of trust and respect for other citizens must exist in order for the community to function in a just manner. Service learning will provide opportunities for collaborating, community building, and developing trust among students and the community.

g. Preparation in an Academic or a Professional Discipline. The comprehensive undergraduate programs will graduate students who are not only well versed in their disciplines, but have also developed an appreciation for diversity and a desire to continue the ideals of service learning. Having student experience the interconnectedness of topics such as citizenship, diversity, openness and justice will facilitate community building and result in habits of lifelong learning.

2. Hurdles

As with any new plan, hurdles exist. The items listed below may very well be impediments to implementing this plan; however, every one of the items can be overcome with planning and professional development.

a. Wide Range of Student Abilities. Students begin their academic careers with a range of abilities. Some students, who have received adequate preparation for college, are ready to move immediately into college level courses. Others need courses to enable them to catch up with the other students. This proposal calls for the integration of courses beginning in a student’s first semester. Students who need academic support in the form of remedial courses, or those who are not ready to take on a full load of rigorous college level courses, may not be able to take full advantage of integrated courses. A plan to accommodate these students must be developed.

b. Academic Needs of Programs. All programs have developed courses to meet the needs of their students. Many of these programs have national and/or state goals and objectives that must be met. As we move toward the integration of courses, these needs must be considered. The rigor of each area must be maintained, while also providing for service learning. Since some programs will also be tied to the Service Learning, careful planning will be required to connect these projects to the integrated curriculum.

c. Professional Development-Team Teaching. Course and topic (e.g., justice) integration will require professional development opportunities for all faculty members. The professional development should include, among other topics, team teaching strategies, curriculum integration, and service learning. Faculty will be afforded the opportunity to request/develop other professional development opportunities as needed.
d. Cost Analysis. A thorough cost analysis will need to be conducted to provide a realistic and accurate picture of what this plan will cost. With the addition of service learning components, which will involve the immediate and regional area around SIUE, the inclusion of businesses should be explored as possible funding sources.

e. Service Learning
      i. Service learning requirements and progress will develop. Faculty/staff mentors will need to be assigned to provide
         the students with someone who is available to assist with the projects. This will require the commitment of the 
         faculty/staff, thus possibly providing faculty/staff opportunities to provide service.
     ii. The scope of this endeavor demands a system by which to document student progress and manage paperwork 
         associated with the projects. 
         
f. Alignment. SIUE, in its quest to become a premier metropolitan university, strives for rigor and quality. In order to 
  provide students with a premier education, two aspects of our proposal are notable: a) the realignment of our 
  department wide programs, b) integration of courses with a service learning component. The purpose of these two 
  efforts is to provide clarity and a clear vision – that is a curriculum that is connected to SIUE values. We propose that 
  all students, faculty and staff will benefit by having their research, teaching, and service connected to a larger university 
  mission.

g. Community College Articulation. SL, integrated courses, etc.: A large number of our students begin their pursuit of 
    higher education in community colleges. 

   Southwestern Illinois College and Lewis and Clark Community College are our main feeder community colleges. We 
   have established strong relationships with them and they welcome the opportunity to collaborate with these institutions so
   that all students are better prepared for their transfer to SIUE.

 

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Appendix A General Education Requirements

General Education Requirements

42-44 Hours

 

Skills Courses - 15-17 hours

(to be satisfactorily completed by the end of the sophomore year)

           Written Expression      6 hours

                      English 101 - English Composition I

                      English 102 - English Composition II

 

          and either Option A or Option B below.

 

          Option A

               Choose One - 3 hours

                    Speech Communication 103 - Interpersonal Communication Skills

                    Speech Communication 104 - Oral Argumentation Skills

                    Speech Communication 105 - Public Speaking

              Choose One - 3 hours

                    Mathematics 106 - Reasoning and Problem Solving

                    Philosophy 106 - Critical Thinking

                    Foreign Language 106 - Word Analysis

                    Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering 106 ­ Engineering Problem Solving (Engineering majors only)

             Choose One - 3 hours

                    Computer Science 108 - Applied Computer Concepts (or one of CS 140, 141 or 150)

                    Computer Management and Information Systems 108 - Computer Concepts and Applications

                          (or one of CS140, 141 or 150)

                    Statistics 107 - Concepts of Statistics (or one of STAT 244, 380 or 480)

      OR

         Option B

              Choose One      Two Semesters

                    Chinese 101 and 102 ­ Elementary Chinese

                    French 101 and 102 - Elementary French (or FR 104-8)

                    German 101 and 102 - Elementary German (or GER 104-8)

                    Greek 101 and 102 - Introduction to Greek

                    Italian 101 and 102 ­ Elementary Italian (or ITAL 104-8)

                    Latin 101 and 102 - Introduction to Latin

                    Russian 101 and 102 - Elementary Russian (or RUS 104-8)

                    Spanish 101 and 102 - Elementary Spanish (or SPAN 104-8)

             Choose One      3 hours

                    Foreign Language 106 ­ Word Analysis

                    Mathematics 106 - Reasoning and Problem Solving

                    Philosophy 106 - Critical Thinking

                    Statistics 107 - Concepts of Statistics (or one of STAT 244, 380 or 480)

                    Computer Science 108 - Applied Computer Concepts (or one of CS 140, 141 or 150)

                    Computer Management and Information Systems 108 - Computer Concepts and Applications

 

 

Introductory Courses - 15 hours

 

Choose two courses from two of the following groups and one course from the third group. The Introductory course in one's major field cannot count toward fulfillment of the Introductory course requirements.

       Fine Arts and Humanities

            Art 111 - Introduction to Art

            English 111 - Introduction to Literature

            Foreign Language 111* - Introduction to Foreign Studies (a) French (b) German (c) Spanish (d) Chinese

            Music 111 - Introduction to Music History/Literature

            Philosophy 111 - Introduction to Philosophy

            Speech Communication 111 - Introduction to Speech Communication

            Theater 111 - The Dramatic Experience

       Natural Sciences and Mathematics

             Biology 111 - Contemporary Biology (or one of BIOL 120, 121 or 240a)

             Chemistry 111 - Contemporary Chemistry (or one of CHEM 120a or 121a)

             Computer Science 111 ­ Concepts of Computer Science

             Earth Science 111 - Introduction to Physical Geology and Geography

             Mathematics 111 - Mathematics for Life (or one of MATH 112A, 120, 125, 130 or 150)

             Physics 111 - Concepts of Physics (or one of PHYS 206a or 211a)

       Social Sciences

            Anthropology 111 - Introduction to Anthropology

            Economics 111 - Principles of Economics

            Geography 111 - Introduction to Geography

             History 111** - Introduction to the History of Western Civilization (a) Renaissance to the Age of Napoleon

                                      (b) Age of Napoleon to the Present

             Political Science 111 - Introduction to Political Science

             Psychology 111 - Foundations of Psychology

             Sociology 111 - Introduction to Sociology

 

*Only one Foreign Language 111 course may be used toward Introductory course requirements. Foreign Language majors may count one Foreign Language 111 course in a language other than the major.

** Either course taken in the History 111 a,b sequence may fulfill either an Introductory or an Advanced Social Science requirement in General Education. No single course in the sequence can fulfill both Introductory and Distribution course requirements.


Distribution Courses - (9 hours)

          Choose one course in each of the following Areas.

                Fine Arts and Humanities

                Natural Sciences and Mathematics

                Social Sciences

 

Students are required to take nine hours of courses that meet distribution course requirements. The distribution requirement is designed to acquaint students with three broad areas in the General Education program. Students must choose one course in each of the following areas:

Fine Arts and Humanities (3)

Natural Sciences and Mathematics (3)

Social Sciences (3)

 

The courses that meet the distribution requirements are identified in the course description section of the catalog and marked Distribution: Fine Arts and Humanities; Distribution: Natural Sciences and Mathematics; and Distribution: Social Sciences.

 

Students may not count a course for distribution credit that carries the departmental prefix of their major department. Skills and introductory courses do not meet distribution requirements.

 

The following courses are not eligible to count for Distribution credit:

AD: All Courses

ANTH 320, 430, 483, 490, 491

AS: All Courses

ART: 112a-d, 202a,b,d,e,f, 202g, 289, 300a-b, 302, 305, 309, 310b, 311, 312, 325, 331, 358, 359, 360, 361, 364, 365, 384, 386, 393, 401, 402, 405, 408a-c, 410, 412, 413, 416, 418, 420, 422, 426, 430, 440, 441, 450, 452, 484, 486, 498, 499

BIOL: 240a, 422, 417, 439, 444b, 467, 468, 471, 473, 480, 483a-c, 490, 491a-u, 492a-d, 493a-w, 495a-f, 495g-n, 497

CHEM: 113, 245, 296, 335, 345, 365a-b, 396, 415, 419, 435, 439, 449, 455, 459, 469, 479, 494, 496, 499

CJ 201, 202, 205, 206, 208, 302, 303, 364, 365, 366, 390, 401, 488, 499

DANCE: 210a-b, 211a-b, 212a-b, 213, 220, 230, 250, 310a-b, 311a-b, 410a-b, 411a-b, 420a, 420b, 433

ECON: 325, 344 400, 415, 417, 439, 450, 490, 491, 492

ENG: 200, 369, 405, 416, 468, 470, 472, 474, 475, 476, 485, 486, 487, 488, 491, 492, 493, 494, 496, 497a, 498, 499

ENSC: 120, 210, 220, 330, 340, 402, 404, 419, 445, 472

FR: 400a,b

GEOG: 312, 322, 406, 416, 427, 428, 440, 450, 470, 490, 499

GER: 305, 400a,b, 454

HIST: 301, 323, 401, 444, 490

HS: All Courses

HUM: 150, 490

IS: All Courses (except 328-IS or Dist. NSM)

ITAL: 220, 499

LIBS: All Courses

MC: 422, 442, 481, 482, 491, 495, 499

MATH: 223, 416a-i, 498, 499

MUS: 100, 112a-121b, 139a-222, 230-244, 301a-c, 318a,b, 322, 333, 337, 340a-355b, 365, 377, 401-411e, 413a-441u, 444-460b, 465-499

OR: All Courses

PHIL: 490, 495

PHYS: 312, 375, 420, 421, 480, 494, 495

POL: 310, 410, 411

PSYC: 497, 498, 499

PAPA: 410, 411, 412, 420

SCI: 401, 405, 411, 414, 415, 421, 425, 431, 435, 442, 451, 452, 462, 489

SOCW: 300, 301, 302, 303, 315, 316, 395, 400, 401, 482, 483

SOC: 396, 433, 495

SPAN: 400a,b

SPC: 309, 409, 415, 461, 491

STAT: 244, 380, 410, 478, 480a,b, 481, 482, 483, 484, 485, 486a,b, 487, 488, 491, 495

SAB: All Courses

THEA: 199, 230, 235, 255, 265, 275, 276, 290, 295, 310a,b, 315a,b, 430, 450, 460, 470, 475, 485, 490, 495, 498, 499a,b,c

UNIV: 112

WMST: 314, 350, 353, 451, 490, 495, 499

Business, Education, Engineering and Nursing courses do not count for General Education credit, with the exception of courses in Psychology and Economics.

 

 

Interdisciplinary Studies - (3 hours)

 

Junior or senior standing is required for enrollment in Interdisciplinary Studies courses.

IS 322 ­      Ethics, Biology and Society

IS 324 ­      Eastern Peoples and Cultures

IS 326 ­      Modern Latin America

IS 328 ­      History and Science

IS 331 ­      Mind and Language

IS 332 ­      The Political and Social Thought of Hegel and Marx

IS 334 ­      Natural Resources

IS 335 ­      Early Illinois

IS 336 ­      Global Problems and Human Survival

IS 340 ­      The Problem of War and Peace

IS 341 ­      The Immigrant in America

IS 342 ­      Death and Dying

IS 343 ­      Contemporary Health Issues

IS 350 ­      Women and Social Institutions

IS 352 ­      Women in the Ancient World

IS 353 ­      The Female Body in History

IS 360 ­      Survival of the Fittest

IS 361 ­      Music: Art and Science

IS 363 ­      Living Ecologically

IS 364 ­      The Atomic Era: European Refugees, American Science and the Bomb

IS 375 ­      Technology and Public Policy

IS 376 ­      Information Technology

IS 377 ­      The Arts and the French Revolution

IS 380 ­      Song and Poetry

IS 385 ­      Risk and Risk Tradeoffs

IS 386 ­      Cyberarts: Exploring Fine Arts and Computer Technology

IS 388 ­      Art and Politics in 19th Century France

IS 400 ­      History, Culture, and Language of China

GBA 300 ­      Foundations of Business Knowledge

 

Intergroup Relations, International Culture, International Issues Requirement

 

Students are required to take one course in the area of Intergroup Relations and a second course from either International Issues or International Culture. Courses taken to fulfill these requirements may also fulfill major, minor, General Education or elective requirements. A list of approved Intergroup Relations, International Culture and International Issues courses may be found in the following section. Courses approved for these requirements also are indicated as such in the course description section of this catalog.

 

Intergroup Relations

          Anthropology

              305 People and Culture of North America

              311 Culture of African-Americans

              312 Contemporary American Indians

              313 Women in Cross-Cultural Perspectives (same as WMST 313)

          Biology

              450 Science, Gender and Race (same as WMST 450)

          Economics

              327 Social Economics: Issues in Income Distribution, Employment, and Social Policy

          English

              205 African-American Literature

              341 The African-American Woman in American Literature (same as WMST 341)

              342 African-American Fiction

              478 Studies in Women, Language, and Literature (same as WMST 478)

          Foundations of Education

              451 Gender and Education (same as WMST 451)

          History

              130 History of Black America

              340 Black Freedom Movement 1955-1975

              423a,b Native Americans 1492-Present

              440 Women in American Social History (same as WMST 440)

              442 The Black Urban Experience

          Interdisciplinary Studies

              350 - Women in Social Institutions (same as WMTS 350)

          Mass Communications

              351 Women in Mass Communications (same as WMST 351)

          Philosophy

              346 - Feminist Theory (same as WMST 346)

              347 Philosophical Foundations of Racism

          Psychology

              405 Psychology of Gender (same as WMST 405)

          Social Work

              486 Perspectives on Human Diversity

          Sociology

              304 Race and Ethnic Relations

              308 Women, Gender and Society (same as WMST 308)

              335 Urban Sociology

          Speech Communication

              103 Interpersonal Communication Skills

              210 Interracial Communication

              331 Gender and Communication (same as WMST 331)

         Women's Studies

             200 Issues in Feminism

             308 Women, Gender and Society (same as SOC 308)

             313 Women in Cross-Cultural Perspectives (same as ANTH 313)

             331 Gender and Communications (same as SPC 331)

             341 African-American Women in African-American Literature (same as ENG 341)

             346 Feminist Theory (same as PHIL 346)

             350 Women in Social Institutions (same as IS 350)

             351 Women in Mass Communications

             405 Psychology of Gender (same as PSYC 405)

             440 Women in American Social History (same as HIST 440)

             450 Science, Gender and Race (same as BIOL 450)

             451 Gender in Education

             478 Studies in Women, Language and Literature (same as ENG 478)

 

International Issues

        Anthropology

             333 Origins of New World Civilization

             350 Anthropology in Contemporary Life

             411 Urban Anthropology

             452 Political Anthropology

       Biology

             365 Ecology

       Economics

             361 Introduction to International Economics

             450 International Finance

             461 International Trade Theory and Policy

             463 Introduction to Economic Development and Growth

        Finance

             450 International Finance

        Geography

             205 Human Geography

             300 Geography of World Population

             301 Economic Geography

             401 Geography of Development

       History

            111b - History of Western Civilization

            112b World History

             314 History of Feminist Thought

             318b History of Russia

             352b History of Africa

             354b History of the Arab World

             356b History of China

             358 History of Japan

             360b History of Latin America

             408c History of England

             413 History of Modern France

             415 History of Modern Germany

            420b European Social, Cultural, and Intellectual History

            422c Late Modern Europe

            424 Topics of European History

            426 Topics in Russian and Soviet History

            428 Topics in European Women's History (same as WMST 428)

            454 History of Arab-Israeli Conflict

            460 History of Mexico

       Humanities

            310a Esperanto

            310b Esperanto

       Interdisciplinary Studies

            326 Modern Latin America

            336 Global Problems and Human Survival

            340 The Problems of War and Peace

            363 Living Ecologically

            364 The Atomic Era: European Refugees, American Science and the Bomb

       Management

            461 Managing in the Global Economy/International Management

       Marketing

           476 International Marketing

       Mass Communications

           453 Transnational Media

       Philosophy

           344 Socialism and Social Democracy

       Political Science

           111 Introduction to Political Science

            350 Political Systems of Western Europe

            351 Eastern European Political Systems in Transition

            355 Political Systems in Latin America

            356 Political Systems in Asia

            370 Introduction to International Relations

            459 Topics in Comparative Politics

            472 International Organizations

            473 United States Foreign Policy

            479 Topics in International Relations

     Sociology

           481 Population Dynamics

    Women's Studies

           314 History of Feminist Thought

           428 Topics in European Women's History

 

International Culture

     Anthropology

         111 Introduction to Anthropology

         301 Language and Culture

         302 World Music

         306 People and Culture of Asia

         307 People and Culture of Latin America and the Caribbean

         310 People and Culture of Africa

         331 World Pre-History

         332 Origins of Old World Civilization

         334 Origins of Agriculture

         340 Cultural Ecology

         400 Cultural Anthropology

         402 Language and Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective

         404 Anthropology and the Arts

         410 Anthropology of Religion

         426 Family and Kinship in Cross-Cultural Perspective (same as WMST 426)

    Art

         225a,b History of World Art

         424a,b Baroque and Rococo Art

         447a,b Ancient Art

         448a,b Early Christian and Medieval Art

         449a,b Renaissance Art

         468a Pre-Columbian Art

         468b North American Indian Art

         469a, b Primitive Art: African and Oceania

         473a,b Women in Art (same as WMST 473a,b)

    Chinese

         102 Elementary Chinese

    English

         304 Literary Masterpieces

         340 Literature of the Third World

         462 Modern British and Continental Drama

    Foreign Language

         111a Introduction to Foreign Studies: French

         111b Introduction to Foreign Studies: German

         111c Introduction to Foreign Studies: Spanish

         230 Foundations of Celtic Culture

         330 The Celtic Heroic Age

         345 Literature in Translation

         350 Celtic Culture: Mythology and Religion

         491 Cultural and Language Workshop

    French

        102 Elementary French

        104 Elementary French

         311 Contemporary French

         351 Survey of French Literature

         352 Survey of French Literature

         353 Survey of the French Novel

         451 Studies in French Literature

         452 Studies in French Literature

         453 Studies in French Literature

         456 Seminar on Women Writers (same as WMST 456)

         457 African and Caribbean Literature of French Expression

    Geography

         111 Introduction to Geography

         201 World Regions

         330 Geography of Europe

         331 Geography of the Commonwealth of Independent States

         332 Geography of Africa

         333 Geography of Asia

         334 Geography of Latin America

    German

         102 Elementary German

         104 Elementary German

         311 German Culture

         351 Survey of German Literature

         352 Survey of German Literature

         353 a-c Survey of German Literature

         411 German Civilization

         452 Faust

         453 Seminar in German Literature

    Greek

         102 Introduction to Greek

    History

         111a Introduction to the History of Western Civilization

         112a World History

         113 Civilizations of the Ancient World

         114 Survey of Medieval History

         302 Ancient Egypt

         303 History of Ancient Near East

         304 History of Greece

         306a,b History of Rome

         308a,b Medieval History

         315 History of Religion in Europe

         318a History of Russia

         322 History of Italy

         352a History of Africa

         354a History of the Arab World

         356a History of China

         360a History of Latin America

         404a,b Social and Intellectual History of the Middle Ages

         412 The French Revolution

         420a European Social, Cultural, and Intellectual History

         422a,b Late Modern Europe

    Interdisciplinary Studies

        324 People and Culture of the East

        353 Representing Women's Bodies 0300-1500

        364 The Atomic Era: European Refugees, American Science and the Bomb

        377 The Arts and the French Revolution

        400 History, Culture and Language of China

    Italian

        102 Elementary Italian

        104 Elementary Italian

    Latin

        102 Introduction to Latin

    Nursing

        315 Nursing V: Teaching and Learning Across the Life Span

    Philosophy

       233 Philosophies and Diverse Cultures

       300 Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy

       301 Medieval Western Philosophy

       302 Classical Modern Western Philosophy

       303 Nineteenth Century Western Philosophy

       308 Twentieth Century European Philosophy

       334 World Religions

       440 Classical Philosophy Theory (same as POLS 484)

       441 Modern Political Theory (same as POLS 485)

    Political Science

       484 Classical Political Theory (same as PHIL 440)

       485 Modern Political Theory (same as PHIL 441)

    Russian

        102 Elementary Russian

        104 Elementary Russian

    Spanish

        102 Elementary Spanish

        104 Elementary Spanish

        311 Contemporary Spain

        312 Contemporary Spanish America

        351 Survey of Spanish Literature

        352 Survey of Spanish-American Literature

        451 Studies in Spanish Literature

        452 Studies in Literature in the Spanish Language

        453 Seminar in Hispanic Literature

        457 Don Quixote

        471 Spanish-American Literature

    Theater

         310 Performance Studio II: International and Experimental Styles

    Women's Studies

         353 Representing Women's Bodies 0300-1500

         402 Language and Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspectives

         426 Family and Kinship in Cross-Cultural Perspectives

         456 Seminar on Women Writers

         473 a,b Women in Art

 

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Appendix B

Description of Sample Integrated Course

 

 

CI433j: Teaching as Performance

Teaching as Performance has been developed for the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in SIUE's School of Education. This course is based on the integration of theories of performance and philosophical
approaches to teaching.  The course draws on the interdisciplinary knowledge of faculty from two departments-Curriculum and Instruction, School of Education , and Theatre and Dance, College of Arts and Sciences and will be  co-taught by a faculty member in each department.


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References

 

Darling-Hammond, L. (1994). Reframing the school reform agenda: Developing capacity for school transformation. In L Hammond, A. Lieberman, D. Wood, & B Fal k , (Eds.), Transforming School Reform: Policies and Practices for Democratic Schools (pp.3-18), National Center for Restructuring Education, Schools and Teaching.

 

Goodlad, J. I. (1996). Democracy, education and community. In R. Soder (Ed.),  Democracy, Education , and the Schools (pp. 87-124). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

 

Goodman, J. (1992). Elementary Schooling for Critical Democracy. Albany: State University of New York Press.

 

Gutmann, A. (1987). Democratic Education. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

 

Parker, W. (1996b). Curriculum for democracy. In R. Soder (Ed.), Democracy, Education and the Schools (pp. 182-210). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

 

Pryor, C.R. & Pryor, B.W. (2005, March 01). Preservice Teachers' Attitudes and Beliefs About Democratic Classroom Practice: Influences on Intentions for Pedagogical Integration. Current Issues in Education [On-line], 8 (6). Available:  http://cie.asu.edu/volume8/number6/index.html

 

Ravitch, D. (1983). The Troubled Crusade: American Education 1945-1980. New York: Harper & Row.

 

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Student Leadership Development Program. Available: http://www.siue.edu/KIMMEL/SLDP/volunteer_service.html

 

Spring, J. (1999). Wheels in the Head. New York: McGraw-Hill.

 

University of California – Berkeley. Service Learning and Research Development Center. Available: http://gse.berkeley.edu/research/slc/

 

University of Michigan, Edward Ginsberg Center for Community Service and Learning. Available: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/

 

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BRIDGE Proposal Overview - Self-Assessment

1. How does your proposal support the values of SIUE (citizenship, excellence, integrity, openness and wisdom)?

This proposal connects citizenship to the general education curriculum by integrating experiences in which students work individually and in teams on projects, which demonstrate their commitment to the community and the body politic. Another component of citizenship is environmental stewardship, or the recognition of the fact that global resources are limited and should be used wisely. Excellence is supported through student command of content knowledge and its application, both practical and theoretical, through various projects involving personal and community responsibility. Integrity is supported as students learn to be reflective and responsible for their ethical and moral behavior, to think of alternative strategies that will allow them to interact effectively with a variety of individuals and circumstances. Students will be encouraged to express ideas and thoughts in an environment of openness that promotes diversity and a student centered curriculum developed by faculty trained to elicit these responses. This proposed curriculum promotes reflection and critical thinking and encourages the connectivity of content areas that fosters the development of wisdom.

2. How does your proposal support the stated objectives of the baccalaureate degree (oral/written communication skills, analytic/problem-solving skills, value of diversity, scientific literacy, ethics, foundation in the liberal arts and sciences, preparation in/for a discipline)?

The rigorous foundation that provides connections across the curriculum enables students to begin to think critically about the world. Integrating the courses, requiring all students to write across the curriculum, and requiring community participation through service learning, will enhance the oral and written communication skills of the students. This proposal also provides a foundation that allows students to develop a basic understanding of each of the content areas in order to function well in society. This service learning model promotes the value of diversity as it allows students the opportunity to develop an awareness of the needs of citizens on local and global levels. This curriculum provides a strong foundation in technology and the sciences, which are invaluable in educating undergraduate students as they prepare for their roles in society. A sense of trust and respect for other citizens must exist in order for the community to function in a just manner. Service learning provides opportunities for collaborating, community building, and developing trust among students and the community. The comprehensive undergraduate programs will graduate students who are not only well versed in their disciplines, but have also developed an appreciation for diversity and a desire to continue the ideals of service learning.

3. Does the proposal support the diverse range of needs of SIUE's student body and the special needs of the various professional and academic programs at SIUE?

The proposal supports the diverse range of needs of the student body by being student centered, as well as helping students see the connectivity of the content across the curriculum. Integrating across the curriculum allows students to begin to understand how our world is interconnected. The special needs of the programs are met through a better understanding of the way in which the content areas fit into the world and through academic rigor and consistency.

4. Does the proposal respond to and address the ‘emerging concerns' of the faculty for general education to be relevant it must address (integration, information, communication, application)?

All four criteria are met through this proposal. Integration of content areas, as well as service learning into the content areas, is a very strong component of this plan. Oral and written communication is promoted throughout the curriculum, especially in critical thinking activities. Application of knowledge and service is emphasized through service learning and the integration of courses.

 

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